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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Hofmeyr’

This entry is more about a new Afrikaans song by Steve Hofmeyr – he sings in English too, and if you like the voice of Neil Diamond, then you will surely like his music too. Anyway, this new Afrikaans song is a protest song and I was reading on the link, in this post, about protest songs. Afrikaans is a young language and since the start Afrikaans struggled to survive. The British settled in South Africa in 1820 and then after the South African-British War – Boer War – Afrikaans was also ‘banned’. In primary schools, if you dared to speak your mother tongue [Afrikaans], you got a board around your neck stated ‘Donkey’ on it. At the moment, Afrikaners [not Africans] again, have to fight to survive. Not just to survive as a human race, but also the language as such. Farmers get murdered on a weekly basis [don’t forget the murders in the towns and cities too.] The world is IGNORANT!
Goethe said, “There is nothing more frightening than active ignorance.”
I’ve found the lyrics to the song and also some English words to it [to part of it], but you will get the ‘message’. ‘Apartheid’ was nothing comparing to what happens now in our beautiful country. And if you really think you know everything about Apartheid, then I think you know just a tiny drop in the ocean of what it really was. Being in the UK now for long enough to know what they ‘know’ about ‘Apartheid’, is enough to tell me that they believed anything that was dished up to them as ‘Apartheid’. We all know what the ANC tried to achieve with their ‘campaigns’ and with a world full of narrow-minded people, they achieved what they wanted  including the toi-toi on Trafalgar Square in the 1980’s and their sad sing-songs in America.  Also, I think some of us know WHY things happened as it happened – like the Zimbabwean-ordeal – and it is just a matter of ‘time’ and South Africa will be there  too – then those ‘waiting’ will ‘close in’.[and I’m not referring here to ‘those’ as the Afrikaners]. During the Boer War the British found it hard to win the war… we are a nation made up from different nations. We will fight and stand up again. Ex Unitate Vires= Unity is Strength

Read more about us here:

THE BOER NATIONS

Take a community of Dutchmen of the type of those who defended
themselves for fifty years against all the power of Spain at a time
when Spain was the greatest power in the world. Intermix with them a
strain of those inflexible French Huguenots who gave up home and
fortune and left their country for ever at the time of the revocation
of the Edict of Nantes. The product must obviously be one of the most
rugged, virile, unconquerable races ever seen upon earth.  Take this
formidable people and train them for seven generations in constant
warfare against savage men and ferocious beasts, in circumstances
under which no weakling could survive, place them so that they acquire
exceptional skill with weapons and in horsemanship, give them a
country which is eminently suited to the tactics of the huntsman, the
marksman, and the rider.  Then, finally, put a finer temper upon their
military qualities by a dour fatalistic Old Testament religion and an
ardent and consuming patriotism.  Combine all these qualities and all
these impulses in one individual, and you have the modern Boer — the
most formidable antagonist who ever crossed the path of Imperial
Britain.  Our military history has largely consisted in our conflicts
with France, but Napoleon and all his veterans have never treated us
so roughly as these hard-bitten farmers with their ancient theology
and their inconveniently modern rifles. —Arthur Conan Doyle

Click THIS link to read the entire article by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), Scottish author and creator of the oft-quoted detective-hero Sherlock Holmes wrote The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1891)

On THIS LINK link, – on my blog – I said in 2007 that I hope we as a nation will – again – rise and stand together one day. Eventhough we are scattered all over the planet at the moment, I do look forward to that day when things will ‘come together’ for all of us.

What is protest music? In April 1966, Bob Dylan arrived in Stockholm as part of his controversial “electric” world tour, and a local interviewer asked him why he was no longer writing and performing protest songs. Dylan, irritated and more than a little out of it, objected to the question’s premise and called one of his new rock ’n’ roll compositions the very height of protest music: “Very, very protesty. And, uh, one of the protestiest of all things I ever protested against in my protest years.”

Please click HERE to read the entire article.

Ons Sal Dit Orleef

Ons sal dit oorleef – Steve Hofmeyr
“Daar’s ‘n land en ‘n volk in een taal gedoop
Met gebede en buskruit en bloed gekoop
Wat weer en weer van sy knie af moet streef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Uit die kake van oormag deur die vuur op ons werf
Staan die engele by ons vroue en die kinders wat sterf
Elke grafsteen een standbeeld vir die wat bly leef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

My hart klop toktokkie waar hy breek vir my volk
Voor die kakie kanon of die k****r se dolk
Dit maak nie meer saak nie waar ons ons begeef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Ek lig my oë tot die berge op
Waar sal my hulp tog vandaan kan kom
Ag my God jou woorde lê deur my geweef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Ek staan vandag op jou plaas ou vriend
Daar hang stof oor die stilte sovêr ek kan sien
Maar die geeste van gister sal more herleef
Ons sal dit oorleef

Some of the words in English.

My heart beats toktokkie where it breaks for my people
against the English (Khaki) canons or the Kaffir’s dagger
It matters none where we now are heading
We will survive this ordeal …

I raise my eyes to the mountains
ask where will my help arrive from?
Oh my Lord your words are woven within me…
We will survive this ordeal…
English lyrics: whatishappeninginsouthafrica.blogspot

Conversation between Theodore A… and Steve on Twitter [you might want to click the image for a clear view]

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moon_1

It was National Poetry Day today in the ukay and I want to share this song by Steve Hofmeyr to celebrate poetry, not just in the ukay, but everywhere. Do listen to the words of this song – beautiful!  Poetry, love and music…touching the strings of my heart.[and of course…chess!]
If you like this song, click
here to listen to more songs from a variety of artists and to read a few love poems in English as well as in Afrikaans.

[Sorry, I’ve removed the song due to another site getting people to download it from my site..that is illegal]
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_tablemountain

Table Mountain, Cape Town, South Africa

I was tagged by Skoor  to post an entry about my favourite music. Well, I’ve done so many entries about music before, especially classical music that I’ve decided to blog a few tracks from my other favourites. I think all the music files in this entry refer to love  which is quite important in our lives! Many of my chess-player-friends on Chessworld know that I have a passion for my country/language and therefore the first song is an Afrikaans song. Steve sings it and he’s one of my favourite singers. In this entry you can also listen to a few love songs which I blogged with a couple of love-poems and you can listen to Steve singing in English! As a poetry-lover, I have also a poem for you to enjoy; music, poetry and love…hmm…you can’t separate it…and I have a movie for you, about SA of course, with some beautiful music…this time, classical music!

This first Afrikaans song is a love song and the title says in English ..”Far away from here”…and that’s what I am…far from South Africa…my beloved country!

steve

Steve Hofmeyr – Ver hier vandaan

dan-fogelberg

I was introduced to this song by one of my friends when I was a student and I still like this song.

Dan Fogelberg – Leader of the band


I was asked by
a blogreader to translate the following poem – which is originally an Afrikaans poem –  into English. It’s a poem that will “touch” you. On the link you can read the Afrikaans poem, actually, I don’t think Afrikaans speaking readers will read it as we all know this poem very well!  I had to know it by heart when I was at primary. It’s part of our history and I even believe that many other culture groups in South Africa also know the poem. This is a poem written by one of our National Poets, A G Visser and it’s based on the truth. I have a link for you in this post where you can read the history behind the poem.

Amakeia

A G VISSER- poem translated

In the shadow of the mountains
bush-sheltered on all sides
stands alone the wattle-and-daub hut
on the boarder of Kaffircountry.

Softly Amakeia hums
on the banks of the River Kei
till he sleeps, the tender baby
of the white pioneer:

“Hush now, hush now, hush Little One
see how the evening star twinkles
No one will hurt you, Little One
hush now, even if Mummy isn’t near.”

Amakeia had promised
when her madam was dying
to look after her vulnerable baby
till he’s a grown-up boy.

Lovingly she cares
for the white child
till the light of day beams
from Amakeia’s friendly-loyal black face.

She sees the ominous
signs of war:
Quick the invasion, home and haven
Slaughtered and burnt down

Selflessly, death defying
with the white child on her back
to the Amakeia mountains
she’d hastily fled

“Hush now, hush now, Pikanini
over the mountains the moon rises
No one will see us here
Tomorrow we’ll go home.”

Oh, that the eyes of the scouts
had to discover their hiding place!
“Save him, he’s so little!” she begs
with hands stretched out.

Ragingly snarled the wild gang:
“Die or give the white child here!”
“Over my lifeless body,”
replied Amakeia vivaciously.

“My promise to my madam,
the best I could asked for:
Where he goes, Amakeia goes,
to care for him.”

“Unite in death
If in life you can’t be parted.
Quick death with her, Maxosas,
Let the glinting spears rain down!”

In the Amatola valleys
Howls only the winter wind
through the reeds in the moonlight:
“Tula-tula – sleep my child.”

Translated:
(c) Nikita 9:30 14/2/2009

Please click here to read  about the history behind the poem. The link will open in a new window.

A few years ago, when I taught 11 year old kiddies in SA, I used this next  song in a listening skills exercise. About 2 years ago, when I walked the streets of London, this song came to my mind – of course also the lesson I taught! – and I thought by myself…what Roger sings  is so true.  I’ve never thought that I would one day walk the streets of London and experience what he sings in this song!
lady-in-london
Image: geographyofgrace.com

Roger Whittaker – Streets of London

streets-of-london
Image: flickr.com: 2350/2261847707_ce11506ce7

I do like Katie’s music…she’s a lovely artist….do enjoy this song!


Katie Melua – The closest thing to crazy

crazy-love1

Image: designbydani.com

Dennis East is a South African artist. Enjoy his song…I think this is a ’80’s song. Listen closely to the words! and Queen will always be on my music menu! The last song…For a kiss…is a cute song! Listen and enjoy!

Dennis East – A Rose has to die
dying-rose
Image: farm3.static.flickr.com/2117/2268046339_6ec9b65f42


Queen – Somebody to love

kiss06


Venice – For a kiss

Amatola mountains
The Amatola mountains in South Africa

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The Afrikaans Language Monument, Paarl, Cape Province, South Africa

The Afrikaans Language Monument…from a different angle

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Africa/South_Africa/photo600228.htm

The original idea behind the Afrikaans Language Museum in the 1970’s was to honour the members and work of the society – GRA – founded in 1875 in Paarl. Their aims were to establish Afrikaans as a written language, to standardise the language and to start publishing in Afrikaans. Gideon Malherbe was one of the founders.

This post will be mainly in Afrikaans…You can enjoy the images with the captions in English. As 14th Aug is an important day for Afrikaans, the language, -the most beautiful language in the whole wide world! -I would like to dedicate this post to Afrikaans, the language of my mother tongue, the language I love and the language I cherish! I do write many posts in English, as I have chess players on Chess World that come here often to read and the whole idea of my blog in the start was to blog about South Africa- the country I love – and to introduce them all to the most beautiful country in the world!  On this link – on my blog – you can see magazine covers in Afrikaans and also read some bits from the family magazine – “Huisgenoot” dated 1916 – Advertisements in English.https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2007/09/28/huisgenoot1916/
Here’s an extract of Steve Hofmeyr’s song…”Gatvol”

Net een ding irriteer  my meer as ‘n Engelssprekende Suid Afrikaner   wat aanmatigend oor sy taal is. Daardie een ding wat my so grensloos irriteer en wat ek selfs verafsku, is Afrikaners wat probeer Engels wees. Sulke spontane kulturele selfverkragting is tipies van ‘n sekere tipe agterlike Afrikaner. Ja, diegene ly blykbaar aan’n intense minderwaardigheidsgevoel oor hul herkoms…http://www.praag.org/mambo/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=40&Itemid=37

Die  inligting wat nou volg,  het ek van Roosmaryn se blog gekry. Ek geniet haar blog geweldig en kuier gereeld daar. Jy sal haar blognaam kry in my verwysings. Hierdie inligting is alles wat in my soektog op haar blog opgekom het toe ek na inligting oor die GRA gesoek het. Sommige van julle sal weet dat 14 Aug altyd as “Afrikaanse dag”  – “herdenk” is. Dit is die dag waarop die GRA (Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners) gestig is ..14 Aug 1875. Lees hierdie brokkies van Roosmaryn, dis werklik interessant. Aan die einde van hierdie pos is daar twee gedigte…jy kan op die bladsy “my poetry-gedigte” nog meer Afrikaanse gedigte ook vind.
FAK se Taalkomitee gestig
2 Junie 1967

Die Hoofbestuur van die FAK het sy Taalkomitee gestig om hom te adviseer oor die wyse waarop die FAK sy taak ten opsigte van die handhawing en bevordering van Afrikaans kan uitvoer. Die komitee het van meet af aan doelgerig aandag geskenk aan die bevordering van Afrikaans onder meer in die sakewêreld, die hotelbedryf, die staatsdiens, die vervoerwese, op alle onderwys vlakke en die naamgewing van strate en dorpsgebiede. Dit is gedoen by wyse van gereelde briefwisseling en persoonlike onderhoude. Boek uitstallings, soos die omvangryke boeke fees in die Taalfeesjaar in die Paarl in 1975, is ‘n gereelde projek van die komitee om die lees van die Afrikaanse boek te bevorder. Die Langenhoven fees is in 1973 gereël, die gevierde skryfster M.E.R. is met haar honderdste verjaardag vereer, en huldigingsfeeste vir Totius (1977) en A.G. Visser -1978- is gehou. Die publikasies Afrikaans ons Pêrel van Groot Waarde en GRA Herdenk is op inisiatief van die komitee in 1974 en 1975 uitgegee. Afrikaans was by verskeie Algemene Vergaderings die kongres tema, en gereelde artikels oor al die aspekte van taalbevordering word vir Handhaaf gelewer. FAK–365Spore.blogspot.com


22 April 1923
D.F. (Oom Lokomotief) du Toit oorlede

Daniel Francois du Toit, D.P. seun, in later jare alombekend as Oom Lokomotief, is op 15 Januarie 1846 op die plaas Kleinbos, Daljosafat, gebore en is in Bloemfontein oorlede. Hy was ‘n stigterslid van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners. In 1878 word hy redakteur van die Afrikaanse Patriot, en hy oefen op die wyse geweldig baie invloed uit op die Taalbeweging. Van Die Patriot het hy ‘n gevestigde koerant met invloed gemaak. Hy het so eie met die lesers gesels dat hulle vertroue in sy koerant gehad het. Alle moontlike vrae word daarin beantwoord; daar word raad gegee, moed ingepraat en koers aangedui. Daar ontstaan ‘n onverbreekbare band tussen leser en redakteur. Met die veranderde politieke houding van sy ouer broer, ds. S.J. du Toit, leier van die GRA, kon hy nie saamgaan nie, en hy verlaat saam met C.P. Hoogenhout in 1891 Die Patriot. In 1892 verhuis hy na die Vrystaat, waar hy later in Bloemfontein argivaris was. Aka fak P.J.N–365Spore.blogspot.com

1874
W. Postma gebore

Willem (dr. O’kulis) Postma was ‘n Gereformeerde predikant, baanbreker skrywer en streng Calvinis. In Bloemfontein beywer hy hom vir die erkenning van Afrikaans as taal en voorspel dat Afrikaans een van die amptelike tale van Suid-Afrika sal word. Hy het as CNO-man die Engelse Onderwysstelsel in die OVS heftig teëgestaan. Gevolglik stig hy die eerste CNO-skool in 1905 in die voorportaal van die Gereformeerde Kerk, Bloemfontein. In 1916 word hy voorsitter van die provinsiale onderwyskommissie in die OVS. Op die eerste vergadering van die Bybelvertalings kommissie (22November 1916) verteenwoordig hy die Gereformeerde Kerk en in dieselfde jaar verskyn uit sy pen ‘n vertaling in Afrikaans van die Nuwe Testamentiese boek Titus. In 1914 word hy die regterhand van genl. J.B.M. Hertzog tydens die stigting van die Nasionale Party. In 1909 verskyn sy werk, Die esels kakebeen. Hy is op 13 Desember 1920 op Reddersburg oorlede. Aka fak D.E


1876
Eerste Beginsels van die Afrikaanse Taal gepubliseer

Die voorstanders van Afrikaans het dadelik besef dat ‘n Afrikaanse spraakkuns onontbeerlik is. Nog voor die stigting van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners skryf Een Ware Afrikaander (ds. S.J. du Toit) op 30 Januarie 1875 aan Klaas Waarzegger jr. (C.P. Hoogenhout) oor die Eerste Beginsels van die Afrikaanse Taal onder meer die Eerste Beginsels van die Afrikaanse Taal onder meer Die eerste vraag sal wees …wat is die Afrikaanse taal? Die eerste boekies is geskryf en gedruk ooreenkomstig ‘n bepalingin die statute van die GRA. Die naam van die vroegste werkie is Eerste Beginsels van die Afrikaanse Taal (1876), wat veral die hand van ds. S.J. du Toit verraai, maar waaraan ook eerw.. J.W. van der Rijst en C.P. Hoogenhout meegewerk het. Dit was maar dun en het slegs 29 bladsye leesstof bevat. Ses jaar later is dit herdruk en in 1897 deur ds. Du Toit enigsins omgewerk, toe 6 000 eksemplare van die Fergelykende Taalkunde fan Afrikaans en Engels, soos dit nou heet, gedruk is. In 1902 was ‘n herdruk al nodig. Die GRA is op hulle vergaderings gereeld op die hoogte gehou van die vordering wat gemaak is met die skryf en publikasie van Eerste Beginsels. Aka fak P.J.N

1859
E.J. du Toit gebore

Erns Johannes du Toit, oorlede op 12 Januarie 1924, was hoof van die drukkers firma D.F. du Toit en Co. en later lid van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners. Hy het verskeie van die eerste Afrikaanse boeke uitgegee en ook die laaste jaargange van die koerante Die Afrikaanse Patriot en die tydskrif Ons Klyntji.
Aka fak prof. dr. P.J. Nienaber

1876
Die Afrikaanse Patriot verskyn vir die eerste keer

Met die stigting van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners op 14 Augustus 1875 in die Paarl is ‘n tydvak van georganiseerde stryd om die Afrikaanse taal ingelui. In artikel IX van die Genootskap se bepalings word beoog om ‘n Afrikaanse maandblad uit te gee. Op hierdie dag in 1876 verskyn die eerste uitgawe van die maandblad Die Afrikaanse Patriot, wat die orgaan van die GRA sou wees. C.P. Hoogenhout was die eerste redakteur onder die skuilnaam Oom Lokomotief, wat deur die redakteurs na hom oorgeneem is. In Die Patriot dek die GRA die terreine van hul doelstelling, naamlik die van land, volk en taal. Daarin is leiding gegee ten opsigte van landsake, die Afrikaanse taal, geskiedenis en belangrike nuus. ‘n Rubriek van vrae en antwoorde is ontwerp om weetgierigheid op te wek en te bevredig. Afrikaners is aangemoedig om bydraes te stuur, sodat hulle kon leer om hulle taal ook te skryf. Die redaksie het lesers aangespoor om gedigte hou foutief ook al, in te stuur. Deur taal bespreking wou die GRA liefde, eerbied en belangstelling opwek vir die Afrikaanse taal. In eenvoudige spreektaal sou die lesers ingelig word oor die vernaamste nuus. So kon plattelandse Afrikaners bereik en opgevoed word vir wie die Hollandse en Engelse taal moeilik leesbaar was. Die Patriot het sterk teenkanting ontvang sowel van Hollandse as van Engelse kant. Medewerkers het onder skuilname geskryf en moes dikwels onder growwe spot deurloop. Die sterkste teenkanting het van die voorstanders van Hollands gekom, wat Nederlands as die volkstaal gesien het en Afrikaans as ‘n “patois”, ‘n Hotnotstaaltjie beskou het. Ten spyte van teenkanting het die redaksie soms met groot opoffering voorgegaan, en teen 1880 was Die Patriot die mees gelese blad in Suid-Afrika. Dit was veral te danke aan die politieke houding wat die blad aangeneem het, gebaseer op Christelike beginsels en die strewe om die Afrikaanse volksaak te bevorder. In 1904 is die blad gestaak na kwynende belangstelling, veral as gevolg van die veranderde politieke beleid van S.J. du Toit, wat sy steun aan Rhodes toegesê het. Die redaksie van Die Patriot het insig in die behoeftes van die volk gehad en was daarop ingestel om by die eenvoudige Afrikaners die behoefte aan geestesvoedsel op te wek en dan daarin te voorsien. Die blad het leiding gegee in landsake en die Afrikaner laat belang stel in die politiek. Die Patriot het baie bygedra tot die ontwaking van ‘n Afrikanernasionalisme deur die Afrikaner bewus te maak van die skoonheid van sy taal, sy eie grootse geskiedenis en sy unieke geestesbesit. Dit het die Afrikaner leer lees en skryf en hom laat besef dat sy spreektaal nie vir Hollands as skryftaal hoef terug te staan nie. As die eerste Afrikaanse koerant, het Die Patriot ‘n onberekenbare bydrae gelewer tot die opheffing van Afrikaans tot skryf- en volkstaal. Aka fak prof. dr. P.G. Nel

1865
Jan F.E. Celliers gebore

Johannes Francois Elias Celliers was ‘n bekende Afrikaanse skrywer, digter en dramaturg. Hy lê sy Landmeters eksamen in Nederland af, maar word later ‘n amptenaar in die onderwysdepartement van die ZAR en in 1894 staatsbibliotekaris in Pretoria. Met die uitbreek van die Engelse Oorlog, sluit hy hom by die kommando’s aan, en in 1902 vertrek hy na Europa, waar hy sy beroemde gedig: Die Vlakte skryf. In 1907 keer hy na Suid-Afrika terug en werk by die Departement van Binnelandse Sake in Transvaal. In 1919 word hy ‘n buitengewone professoraat aan die Universiteit van Stellenbosch aangebied. Baie van sy verse weerspieël sy huislikheid en liefde vir kinders. Behalwe sy digterlike arbeid, werk hy ook mee tot die stigting van Die Brandwag. Hy was ‘n volksdigter, “een wat in woorde vaslê wat in die hart van die nasie omgaan” (Preller). Sy prosawerk is van weinig literêre waarde, maar as digter beklee hy ‘n besondere plek in die Afrikaanse letterkunde. Hy vestig hom na sy aftrede aanvanklik in Kaapstad maar later op Harrismith, waar hyop 1 Junie 1940 oorlede is. aka fak prof. dr. P.G. Nel


Vryheidslied

Vrome vad’re fier en groot!
Deur vervolging, ramp en nood,
was hul leuse, tot die dood:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Erfnis van hul moed en trou
is die grond waar ons op bou.
Juigend tot die hemelblou:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Ere wie die dood mag lei
om te rus aan hulle sy,
met die sterwenswoord te skei:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Op dan, broers en druk hul spoor,
voorwaarts, broers, die vaandel voor,
laat die veld ons krygsroep hoor:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Woes geweld mag hoogty hou,
kettings mag ons lede knou,
maar die leuse bly ons trou:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Jukke mag vir slawe wees,
manneharte ken geen vrees,
duld geen boei vir lyf of gees:
Vryheid! Vryheid!

Woorde: JaN F.E. Celliers
Musiek: Emiel Hullebroeck


Die vlakte

Ek slaap in die rus van die eeue gesus,
ongesien, ongehoord,
en dof en loom in my sonnedroom,
ongewek, ongestoord.
Tot die yl-bloue bande van die ver-verre rande
skuif my breedte uit,
wyd-kringend aan die puur al-omwelwend asuur
wat my swyend omsluit.

Jong aarde se stoot het my boesem ontbloot
bo die diep van die meer;
en volswanger van lewe ‘t oor die waat’re geswewe
die gees van die Heer.
Uit die woelende nag van haar jeugdige krag
brag die aarde voort
Lewiatansgeslagte, geweldig van kragte –
storm-ontruk aan haar skoot.
Diep in my gesteente berg ek hul gebeente –
die geheim van hul lewe en lot;
maar gewek uit die sode herleef uit die dode,
na die ewig hernuwingsgebod,
die van d’ verlede in vorme van d’ hede,
in eindeloos komme en gaan;
wat die dood my vertrou ‘t, ek bewaar dit as goud,
en geen grein sal ‘k verlore laat gaan.

As die son oor my vloer in die more kom loer,
en die dou van my lippe kom kus,
dan kyk ek net stom met ‘n glimlag om
en ek le maar weer stil in my rus.
Hog bowe die kim op sy troon geklim,
is hy heer van lewe en dood;
na wil of luim gee hy, skraal of ruim,
verderf of lewensbrood.

Uit die gloeiende sfeer brand hy wreed op my neer,
tot my naaktheid kraak en skroei,
en my koorsige asem in bewende wasem
al hygend my bors ontvloei.
In sy skadetjie rond om sy stam op die grond
staat ‘n eensame doringboom,
soos die Stilte op haar troon, met dorings gekroon,
wat roerloos die eeue verdroom.
Geen drop vir die dors aan my stofdroe bors:
my kinders* versmag en beswyk,
en die stowwe staan soos hul trek en gaan
om my skrale dis te ontwyk.

Soos ‘n vlokkie skuim uit die sfere se ruim
kom ‘n wolkie aangesweef,
maar hy groei in die blou tot ‘n stapelbou
van marmer wat krul en leef –
kolossaal monument op sy swart fondament,
waar die bliksem in brul en beef.
En o, met my is die windjies bly:
hul spring uit die stof orent
en wals en draai in dwarrelswaai
oor my vloer, van ent tot ent:
die gras skud hul wakker om same te jakker,
tot hy opspring uit sy kooi
en soos mane en sterte van jaende perde
sy stingels golf en gooi.

Met dof-sware plof, soos koeels in die stof,
kom die eerste drupples neer,
tot dit ruis alom soos deur die gebrom
en gekraak van die donderweer.
Met kloue vooruit om te gryp en te buit
jaag ‘n haelwolk langs verby,
soos ‘n perde-kommande wat dreun oor die lande
vertrap en gesel hy-
en sy lyke-kleed sien ek ver en breed
in die awendson gesprei.

Stil in die duister le ‘k so en luister
hoe die spruite gesels en lag;
maar bowe die pak van my wolkedak
het die maan al lank gewag:
nou breek en skeur hy ‘n baan daardeur
om te deel in my vreug benede;
hy sprei die waas van sy romig-blou gaas-
en ek lag so stil-tevrede.
Plek op plek, soos die wolke trek,
sweef die skaduwees onder mee,
soos eilande wyd oor die waat’re verspreid
op die boesem van die grote see.
Met ‘n afskeidskus gaan die maan ook ter rus,
en ek wag op die daeraad-
so skoon en so mooi soos ‘n fris jong nooi
wat lag in haar bruidsgewaad.

Oor die bukte se rug slaat die gloed in die lug
van die brande wat ver-weg kwyn,
en doringbome fluister in rooi skemerduister
van gevare wat kom of verdwyn.
Uit slote en plas, uit die geurende gras,
styg ‘n danklied op ten hemel;
en dis net of ek hoor hoe die kriekies se koor
weergalm uit die sterre gewemel,
waar wêrelde gaan op hul stille baan
tot die einde van ruimte en tyd.
So, groots en klaar, staat Gods tempel daar,
wyd – in sy majesteit.

* “kinders” is wildsbokke
Uit “Die Vlakte” -1908-

1847
Ds. S.J. du Toit Gebore
Stephanus Jacobus du Toit is op Dal Josafat by die Paarl gebore. Hy het sy skool-en teologiese opleiding respektiewelik aan die Paarlse Gimnasium en die Kweekskool op Stellenbosch ontvang. S.J. du Toit was onder die invloed van Arnoldus Pannevis ‘n vurige voorvegter vir Afrikaansas selfstandige taal. Sy politiek-nasionale doelstelling- “om te staan vir ons taal, ons nasie en ons land” – het hy deur die stigting van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners (GRA) op 14 Augustus 1875, met as spreekbuis Die Afrikaanse Patriot, die Afrikanerbond in 1879 en sy aandeel in die opstel van die Afrikaanse Volkslied, bevorder. Hy kan daarom as die eerste Afrikaanse Nasionalisbeskou word. In 1882 het hy Superintendent van Onderwys in Transvaal geword. Sy onderwyswet het die onderwys in die Republiek bevorder. Sy eersug en betrokkenheid by Transvaalse politieke aangeleenthede, soos die Wesgrens-kwessie, die Pretoria-Konvensie, aandelespekulasies in die Goudstad, leerstellige aangeleenthede en sy teenkanting teen die regering se konsessiebeleid, het hom in regeringskringe ongewild gemaak. In 1888 het hy as Superintendent van Onderwys bedank en hom weer in die Paarl gaan vestig, waar hy hom met die vertaling van die Bybel in Afrikaans, ‘n taak deur die GRA in 1885 aan hom oorgedra, besig gehou het. Hy was dus ook ‘n baanbreker op die gebied van die Afrikaanse Bybelvertaling. Na sy terugkeer in die Paarl het hy die beleidsrigting van Die Patriot gewysig. Sy kritiek op die Krugerbewind en pleidooie vir konsiliasie tussen Brits- en Afrikaanssprekendes het hom verder van sy mede-Afrikaners vervreem. Die gevolg was dat die Eerste Taalbeweging, waarvan hy die vader was, teen 1900 doodgeloop het. In sy tweede Paarlse tydperk het ds. S.J. du Toit egter verbasend veel ter bevordering van die Afrikaanse taal en letterkunde sowel as oor algemene en godsdienstige onderwerpe gepubliseer. Hy het verskeie Afrikaanse boeke geskryf, soos Die Koningin van Skeba (1898), die eerste Afrikaanse gepubliseerde drame. Hy het ook gedigte geskryf, maar hulle is nooit gebundel nie. Hy is algemeen beskou as die “Vader van die Afrikaanse taal; stigter van die Afrikanerbond en stryder van die Calvinisme”. (Die inskripsie op sy graf). In sy lewe was hy predikant van die NG Kerk, Calvinistiese teoloog, Bybelvertaler, leier van die Eerste Afrikaanse Taalbeweging, skrywer, Superintendent van Onderwys in Transvaal, en koerant- en tydskrifredakteur. Op ‘n besoek aan Calvinia in Augustus 1910 het sy perdekar omgeval. Die ernstige beserings wat hy in die ongeluk opgedoen het, het uiteindelik gelei tot sy sterwe op 28 Mei 1911 op Kleinbosch, Dal Josafat. Dankie aan Roosmaryn! 365Spore.blogspot.com

The National Afrikaans Literature Museum in Bloemfontein

Charlize Theron…Afrikaans speaking..and proud to admit it!

This T-shirt says…”my dad is bigger than your dad!”…you all know that one for sure!

As jy ‘n DelaRey t-shirt het…sal jy die woorde ken!

This t-shirt says: Daddy’s little sperm!! hehe

This card says…”I love you” in Afrikaans.

Afrikaans on T-shirts…image found on google

Jou afwesigheid
Die son se stilte sprei oor die more-dou
en maak jou afwesigheid soveel moeiliker
Tyd kan nie uitvee die herinneringe
En moeiliker die misverstande
Nog die gebroke siel heel
Maar die soete verlede van lank gele’
Steek vas en onderhou my geheue
Verblydend is jou bestaan
Wat my wêreld  verkleur!

–©Nikita–

 

birds_flying

Afrikaans
Die taal wat ek liefhet
Afrikaans
Die taal wat ek praat
Afrikaans
Die taal waarin ek dink
Afrikaans
Die taal waarin ek droom
Afrikaans
Die taal van my hart
Afrikaans
Die taal wat ek koester
Vir nou en altyd
Afrikaans
Jy is myne
Afrikaans
Jy is nou
Afrikaans
Jy is besonders
Afrikaans
Jy is uniek
Afrikaans
Jy is getrou
Afrikaans:
My denke
My wese
My lewe!
©Nikita 2008
Nadat ek die kort gediggie geskryf het, het ek dit op verskeie webbladsye gelees – en ek is bly julle almal geniet dit! Maak asseblief net seker dat jy krediet gee aan wie dit verskuldig is.
Afrikaanse stories op hierdie link op my blog:
Dankie weereens aan Roosmaryn: 365Spore.blogspot.com

O, BOEREPLAAS

Woorde: C.F. VISSER
Musiek: JOHANNES JOUBERT; verwerk: ARTHUR ELLIS

O boereplaas, geboortegrond!
Jou het ek lief bo alles.
Al dwaal ek heel die wêreld rond,
waar so gelukkig, so gesond?
O boereplaas, geboortegrond!
Jou het ek lief bo alles.

O moederhuis, waar ooit so tuis?
Jou het ek lief bo alles.
Die wêreld, rykdom, prag en praal
kan jou verlies my nooit betaal.
O moederhuis, waar ooit so tuis?
Jou het ek lief bo alles.

O moedertaal, o soetste taal!
Jou het ek lief bo alles.
Van al die tale wat ek hoor,
niks wat my siel ooit so bekoor.
O moedertaal, o soetste taal!
Jou het ek lief bo alles.

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This is Steve Hofmeyr’s version:

Update: 22/04/2012
Listen to Bruce’s version:

Update October 2011

If you are interested in emailing/contacting Bruce Millar – see his message in the comments box. Here is also an email that was left by ‘Natasha Millar’ – assume it is his wife? – or relative – see the comments box. millar@vanilla.co.za

This song is one of my favourites on a Steve Hofmeyr CD…this song was sung by Bruce Millar first before Steve recorded it too. Bruce is a great artist and was born in Zimbabwe…you can read more about Bruce on this link. He’s now a radio presenter in South Africa. What I didn’t know and only discovered recently, was that his song is a translation of this Italian song, Inno, sung by Mia Martini. I could find the Italian song on youtube and you can follow the words in English. I’ve got the words in Italian too and if you understand Italian, you might want to tell me – when comparing the words to the English song – if it’s a true translation… thanks!

English words:
I won’t give up

I won’t give up my dream
There’s a love for me
Somewhere in this world of loneliness
Someone who’s cup is filled with tears
And waiting like me
To share that sweet embrace
And chase away the saddened face
Of yesterday’s fears.

I won’t give up the search
‘Till I find the one
Who’s kisses will awake my heart
And make it fly
I won’t give up
I’m gonna take my stand
Because I know
There’s someone in this world
That won’t give up
‘Till she’s holding my hand
Repeat song twice

Song in Italian!

Cantero’ – se vuoi – ma non credermi
Stelle nelle tasche piu’ non ho
E tu – non sai – volare piu’ – piu’ – piu’ in alto
Nel viso della sera che nasce
Sulla spiaggia coi falo’

Cantero’ – per noi – che non siamo piu’
piu’ forti – di quel po’ – di gioventu’
Che sta – bruciando dentro e poi – finira’
Nel viso della sera che nasce
Sulla spiaggia coi falo’

Dimmi che vuoi – che puoi – darmi felicita’
E sotto – la mia pelle nascera’
Per te un dolce fiume che – cantera’
La mia speranza d’esser donna
E la tua bocca poi lo berra’

Dimmi che il posto mio non sto per perderlo
Dentro la mia fiaccola tu sei
Ma se – non sai bruciare piu’ – resta ancora
Insieme canteremo e legnia
Porteremo al nostro falo’

Dimmi che vuoi – che puoi – darmi felicita’
Apri le tue braccia e se ne andra’
La mia tristezza finalmente sara’ un esplosione
Di stelle cadenti sopra i fuochi gia’ spenti dei falo’
Sole no! Non puoi – piu’ mandarci via
Rosso stai salendo sempre piu’
Lui sta dormendo il mare sa’ – quanto amore
Mi ha dato e mi dara’ rubando il viso di una sera

At last! Bruce on Youtube too!

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Love Poems



All links in this post will open in a new window.
I will always like the music of Queen..this song is called..Las Palabras de Amor. Enjoy!

“I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you straightfowardingly, without complexeties or pride. So I love you because i know no other way than this…” Pablo Neruda

“A kiss is something you cannot give without taking and cannot take without giving.”

“Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man’s son doth know”. William Shakespeare in Twelfth Night (II, iii, 44-45)
“Love is but the discovery of ourselves in others, and the delight in the recognition.” Alexander Smith

Enjoy this song by South African singer…Steve Hofmeyr…”You got me”…


And this South African Golden Oldie! Ge Korsten with “Liefling” and liefling means..”darling”…


Enjoy this song…”Fields of Gold” by Eva Cassidy

Enjoy this song by Ilse de Lange: “What does your heart say now?”


Slide down for the article…”Romance in Chess”…


Listen to the poem on this audio file too…by Robert Burns….source: http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/redredrose.html
Notes: According to “Scottish Songs Illustrated,” this song is a Robert Burns rewrite of an older street ballad, which is said to have been written by a Lieutenant Henches, as a farewell to his betrothed.

0, my love is like a red, red rose,
that’s newly sprung in June.
0, my love is like a melody,
that’s sweetly play’d in tune.

As fair thou art, my bonnie lass,
so deep in love am I,
And I will love thee still, my dear,
till a’ the seas gang dry.

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
and the rocks melt wi’ the sun!
And I will love thee still, my dear,
while the sands of life shall run.

And fare the weel, my only love!
And fare the well awhile!
And I will come again, my love.
Tho it were ten thousand mile!


Read on THIS LINK too the poem by Elizabeth Barret Browning…”How do I love thee”…enjoy! One of my favourites!

”How do I love thee? Let me count the ways…”
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861)

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

Today I’m in a mood to blog about love… What is love? What is your view, we discussed this at work….and we all agreed to the following conclusions…..Is it a sensation..a shared feeling between two people… ..based on physical and emotional attraction..  spontaneously generates when the right person appears. And of course also, it can spontaneously degenerate when the magic “just isn’t there” anymore. You fall in love, and you can fall out of it.
Love is the attachment that results from deeply appreciating another’s goodness. What we value most in ourselves, we must value most in others. God created us to see ourselves as good ….hence our need to either rationalize or regret our wrongdoings….In the Bible He said…after creating us humans… “and that was good”… So, too, we seek goodness in others. Nice looks, an engaging personality, intelligence, and talent may attract you, but goodness is what moves you to love.LOVE IS A CHOICE. Love is active. You can create it. Just focus on the good in another person …..and everyone has some!! If you can do this easily, you’ll love easily.
Love is care, demontrating active concern for the recipient’s life. Love is responsibility. Love is respect, the ability to see a person as he/she is, to be aware of his/her unique individuality. A big part of love is putting another person’s happiness ahead of your own. If you have to “prove” your love to someone, I don’t believe that he/she loves you the way you might think he/she does.When you love another person you don’t ask them to sacrifice a part of themselves in the name of that love. Love is not about jealousy. It is not about conflict. It is not about testing. Love is not about spitefulness. How do you show love to other people? Nobody expect you to “love” all people the way you love your husband/wife, but it is expected from us to “love your neighbour as you love yourself”.
Enjoy the poem: Love Song by T S Eliot
Communication, Communication, and Communication……..on THIS LINK you can read how important communication in a relationship between a married couple is.The link will open in a new window.

 

T S Eliot

On THIS LINK you can read his extract “The Game of Chess”.
Click HEREto read more love poems on my blog.

And…on THIS LINK on my blog….you can read the poem of E A Poe…Annabel Lee…a beautiful love poem.
Ben Jonson

T H E F O R E S T .
IX. — SONG. — TO CELIA.

Drink to me, only with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine ;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup,
And I’ll not look for wine.
The thirst, that from the soul doth rise,
Doth ask a drink divine :
But might I of Jove’s nectar sup,
I would not change for thine.

I sent thee late a rosy wreath,
Not so much honoring thee,
As giving it a hope, that there
It could not wither’d be.
But thou thereon didst only breathe,
And sent’st it back to me :
Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,
Not of itself, but thee.

Love Song

I lie here thinking of you:
the stain of love
is upon the world!
Yellow, yellow, yellow
it eats into the leaves,
smears with saffron
horned branched the lean
heavily
against a smooth purple sky!
There is no light
only a honey-thick stain
that drips from leaf to leaf
and limb to limb
spoiling the colors
of the whole world-
you far off there under
the wine-red selvage of the west!

~~~William Carlos Williams

 

 

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

LET us go then, you and I,
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherised upon a table;
Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats 5
Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question …
Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”
Let us go and make our visit

In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo

The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes,
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes
Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening,
Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains,
Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys,
Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap,
And seeing that it was a soft October night,
Curled once about the house, and fell asleep.

And indeed there will be time
For the yellow smoke that slides along the street,
Rubbing its back upon the window-panes;
There will be time, there will be time
To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet;
There will be time to murder and create,
And time for all the works and days of hands
That lift and drop a question on your plate;
Time for you and time for me,
And time yet for a hundred indecisions,
And for a hundred visions and revisions,
Before the taking of a toast and tea.

In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo

And indeed there will be time
To wonder, “Do I dare?” and, “Do I dare?”
Time to turn back and descend the stair,
With a bald spot in the middle of my hair—
[They will say: “How his hair is growing thin!”]
My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin,
My necktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pin—
[They will say: “But how his arms and legs are thin!”]
Do I dare
Disturb the universe?
In a minute there is time
For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.

For I have known them all already, known them all:—
Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons,
I have measured out my life with coffee spoons;
I know the voices dying with a dying fall
Beneath the music from a farther room.
So how should I presume?

And I have known the eyes already, known them all—
The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase,
And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin,
When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall,
Then how should I begin
To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways?
And how should I presume?

And I have known the arms already, known them all—
Arms that are braceleted and white and bare
[But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair!]
It is perfume from a dress
That makes me so digress?
Arms that lie along a table, or wrap about a shawl.
And should I then presume?
And how should I begin?
. . . . .
Shall I say, I have gone at dusk through narrow streets
And watched the smoke that rises from the pipes
Of lonely men in shirt-sleeves, leaning out of windows?

I should have been a pair of ragged claws
Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.
. . . . .
And the afternoon, the evening, sleeps so peacefully!
Smoothed by long fingers,
Asleep … tired … or it malingers,
Stretched on the floor, here beside you and me.
Should I, after tea and cakes and ices,
Have the strength to force the moment to its crisis?
But though I have wept and fasted, wept and prayed,
Though I have seen my head [grown slightly bald] brought in upon a platter,
I am no prophet—and here’s no great matter;
I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker,
And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker,
And in short, I was afraid.

And would it have been worth it, after all,
After the cups, the marmalade, the tea,
Among the porcelain, among some talk of you and me,
Would it have been worth while,
To have bitten off the matter with a smile,
To have squeezed the universe into a ball
To roll it toward some overwhelming question,
To say: “I am Lazarus, come from the dead,
Come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all”—
If one, settling a pillow by her head,
Should say: “That is not what I meant at all.
That is not it, at all.”

And would it have been worth it, after all,
Would it have been worth while,
After the sunsets and the dooryards and the sprinkled streets,
After the novels, after the teacups, after the skirts that trail along the floor—
And this, and so much more?—
It is impossible to say just what I mean!
But as if a magic lantern threw the nerves in patterns on a screen:
Would it have been worth while
If one, settling a pillow or throwing off a shawl,
And turning toward the window, should say:
“That is not it at all,
That is not what I meant, at all.”
. . . . .
No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;
Am an attendant lord, one that will do
To swell a progress, start a scene or two,
Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool,
Deferential, glad to be of use,
Politic, cautious, and meticulous;
Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse;
At times, indeed, almost ridiculous—
Almost, at times, the Fool.

I grow old … I grow old …
I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled.

Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?
I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach.
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.

I do not think that they will sing to me.

I have seen them riding seaward on the waves
Combing the white hair of the waves blown back
When the wind blows the water white and black.

We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown
Till human voices wake us, and we drown.

Song to Celia
by Ben Jonson

Drinke to me, onely, with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kisse but in the cup,
And Ile not looke for wine.
The thirst, that from the soule doth rise,
Doth aske a drinke divine:
But might I of Jove’s Nectar sup,
I would not change for thine.
I sent thee, late, a rosie wreath,
Not so much honoring thee,
As giving it a hope, that there
It could not withered bee.
But thou thereon did’st onely breath,
And sent’st it back to mee:
Since when it growes, and smells, I sweare,
Not of it selfe, but thee.

Read about Ben Jonson HERE

Robert Browning
A Woman’s Last Word
Let’s contend no more, Love,
Strive nor weep:
All be as before, Love,
—Only sleep!
What so wild as words are?
I and thou
In debate, as birds are,
Hawk on bough!

See the creature stalking
While we speak!
Hush and hide the talking,
Cheek on cheek!

What so false as truth is,
False to thee?
Where the serpent’s tooth is
Shun the tree—

Where the apple reddens
Never pry—
Lest we lose our Edens,
Eve and I.

Be a god and hold me
With a charm!
Be a man and fold me
With thine arm!

Teach me, only teach, Love
As I ought
I will speak thy speech, Love,
Think thy thought—

Meet, if thou require it,
Both demands,
Laying flesh and spirit
In thy hands.

That shall be to-morrow
Not to-night:
I must bury sorrow
Out of sight:

Must a little weep, Love,
(Foolish me!)
And so fall asleep, Love,
Loved by thee.

–Robert Browning

Next I have a National Poet of South Africa…A G Visser. He’s written some beautiful love poems in Afrikaans!
A.G. Visser en Lettie Conradie.
Hy trou in 1913 met Lettie, oorlede in 1920,
en in 1927 met Marie de Villiers.
Read more about
A G Visser here on this link.

Liefdes gedigte: A G Visser
Misère
(Triolet)
The light that lies
In women’s eyes
Just… lies and lies!

In die eerste instansie,
wie sou nou kon dink,
Dat die liefde iets is
so beroerd ongestadig?
Dat die hand wat uit gulde
bokale laat drink,
In die eerste instansie,
wie sou nou kon dink
Dat dit eendag nog edik
en gal weer sal skink,
Ongevoelig meedoënloos,
wreed, ongenadig?
In die eerste instansie,
wie sou nou kon dink
Dat die liefde iets is
So beroerd ongestandig!

http://www.gedichtenbundel.be/testliefdefoto1Eheu fugaces…

Si jeunesse savait.
Si vitesse avait.
Onthou jy nog, Anita lief,
Die aand daar by die strand,
My hart vir jou ’n ope brief,
Jou handjie in my hand?
Die maanlig het die see gesoen,
Die see … die strand, nog heet –
En ons … wat kon ons anders doen?
Kan ons dit ooit vergeet?
Cherie Yvonne, het jy vergeet
Die les in Afrikaans?
Die beste taal het ons geweet,
Die tyd in ou la France.
En aan my hemel onbewolk
Was jy die goue son;
“Toujours l’Amour” was onse tolk;
Onthou jy nog, Yvonne?
Mooi Gretchen, kan jy nog onthou
Ons tyd van soete min?
Die Neckar met sy waters blou,
Jou ogies blou daarin?
Die donkergroene dennewoud
Was liefdes-heiligdom –
Alt Heidelberg, die jeug van goud,
En jy – sal nooit weer kom!
En, bonnie Jean, onthou jy nog
Die eiland van die Swaan?
Ben Lomond en die donker loch
By heldere somermaan?
Aan rosebanke trek ons twee
(Was dit ’n droom – wie weet?)
Wit swane oor die lewensee –
Kan ek dit ooit vergeet?
Maar eenmaal in die lewe kom
Die liefde weergaloos;
En eenmaal in die gaarde blom
Volmaak ’n wonderroos.
Verwelk, helaas, my tuin se prag –
Weg met die donker stroom –
Die wind deurwaai my hof by nag
En vind my met my droom.
O lippe wat nog lag en lonk!
O harte wat nog klop!
Steeds doem gestaltes ewig-jonk
Uit die verlede op.
“Eheu fugaces anni …” sing
Gedagtes wat nou skroei;
Op velde van herinnering
Pers amarante bloei!

Ballade van die roos

’n Ou Spaanse gesegde noem die volgende
drie stadieë in die lewe van ‘n roos:
In die more: rosa pallida.
In die middag: rosa perfecta.
In die aand: rosa incarnada

Waarheen ook my oë mag staar
En waar ook my voete mag gaan,
Geduriglik droom ek van haar;
Haar beeltenis lief lag my aan,
Ek sien – as die sterrelig taan –
’n Roosknop wat stadig ontvou: –
– My noointjie van ver-hier-vandaan –
O „Pallida Rosa”, vir jou!

O blomkelk, met skoonheid belaan,
Ek smag op die middag-uur lou
My noointjie van ver-hier-vandaan
O „Rosa Perfecta”, na jou!

Ek ken jou nog nie – dit is waar –
Maar êrens moet jy tog bestaan;
Die aandson gloei rooi op die blaar
En ’k voel jy’s g’n ydele waan,
Want rooi sprei die liefde haar vaan!
En donker die oë getrou
– My noointjie van ver-hier-vandaan –
O Roos „Incarnada” – van jou!

red_roses1

Andries Gerhardus Visser (1878 – 1929)

visser_lettie

Image:  http://users.telenet.be/

This first video is the song “Words” by F R David

Princesse Lointaine

Was jy ’n rosebloesem
En ek die roos se geur,
Hoe heerlik deur die lewe
Steeds rondom jou te swewe.
Beswymend aan jou boesem,
Betower deur jou kleur.
Was jy ’n rosebloesem
En ek die roos se geur.

Was jy ’n lied se woorde
En ek die melodie.
Hoe sou die dag verheerlik
Jou skoonheid so begeerlik;
Die nag tril van akkoorde
En soetste harmonie.
Was jy ’n lied se woorde,
En ek die melodie.

Was jy die hoogste kranse,
En ek die sonnegloed.
Jou wange sou dan verwe
En op jou lippe sterwe
My eerste moreglanse
En laaste awend-groet;
Was jy die hoogste kranse
En ek die sonnegloed

Maar jy ’s Prinses van Verre
En ek… ’n troebadoer;
Al gloei ook my gesange
Van liefde en verlange,
– Die vuurvlieg vir die sterre –
Wat my ten hemel voer;
Jy bly Prinses van Verre
En ek… ’n troebadoer.

prinses.jpg

Stille Rivierstroom….Nick Taylor

Die middagson helder en klaar
Sien neer van sy blou hemelbaan;
Die roos sal haar hart openbaar
Aan wie haar geheime verstaan.
Jou huis is waar jou hart is
My hart is leeg geween
Vandat sy verdwyn het
wandel ek oral alleen

Sing oor somer briese
Jou weemoed sleep weer oor
Saammet die lowerstruike
sing my ‘n hemelse koor

Chorus:
Liefde, Liefde’s ‘n stille rivierstroom
wat vloei deur ons woestynland
Droog die rivier weg
dan sal al die klein vissies sterf

Ek stap deur lee strate
Die echo’s maak my seer
My hart is soos my hande
soekend maar bly altyd leeg

Woestyne kan my nie keer nie
Ek baan deur storms my weg
Ek sal die rivier weer terugvind
voor hierdie klein vissie sterf

Chorus

ROMANCE IN CHESS?
Romance in chess? ‘What could possibly be less romantic than chess?’ you might be asking. After all, chess is a game of war based on logic, isn’t it? There is nothing romantic about war or logic.

Many players are familiar with the famous quote by Dr. Siegbert Tarrasch from the preface to his classic manual The Game of Chess : ‘Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy’ (which politically correct writers of more recent times change to ‘the power to make people happy’). Less familiar is Tarrasch’s preceding sentence, ‘I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love.’

Chess once served a social function of allowing young men and women to meet above the board. Echecs et Féodalité : Raoul de Cambrai (Chess and feudalism; from Culture et curiosités, see the link box in the upper right corner of this article) tells of a poem by Bertolai, a 10th century poet from Laon, France. The poem, about a war of succession in Northern France, references chess twice. In the second reference chess is used as an excuse by the daughter of the new overlord Guerri to woo the hero Bernier to her chambers. Her chamberlain, assigned the task of arranging the meeting, says to Bernier, ‘My young lord, you can be proud of yourself, since the daughter of Guerri, the most noble woman from here to the south of France, asks that you join her in her apartments, to play chess. You should comply, but don’t play chess.’

The significance of this might be lost in our age of instant gratification, but as recently as 100 years ago, chess still occasionally served as a means to a more romantic end.


This popular illustration by Clarence Frederick Underwood (American, 1871-1929), is often listed under various titles. Our favorite is Knight takes Queen. This theme is not as unique as you might think. One web site has a collection of more than 50 drawings and photos, all with the theme ‘Couples playing chess’ (see the link box again). The images invariably have titles like ‘The right move’, ‘The greatest game in the world’, or variations on the word mate : ‘Impending Mate’, ‘Check and mate’, etc. The word ‘checkmate’ even figured in at least one early valentine.

‘My little love do you remember,
Ere we grew so sadly wise,
When you and I played chess together,
Checkmated by each others eyes?’
Source: http://chess.about.com/library/weekly/aa05b12.htm

love all night

Wow, one chess player on the chess site tells me he’s busy reading this book! E..er…

love rose

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afrikaans-monument1.jpg
The Afrikaans Language Monument and Museum, Paarl, Cape Town

 

 

  

I love you….in Afrikaans…”Ek is lief vir jou”..
Read on Wikipedia about this monument and on THIS link there’s more info about it. Why Afrikaans is not an African language and I agree 100% with the writer of this article.
Read on
Wikipedia more about Afrikaans.

Afrikaans

Die taal wat ek liefhet

Afrikaans

Die taal wat ek praat

Afrikaans

Die taal waarin ek dink

Afrikaans

Die taal waarin ek droom

Afrikaans

Die taal van my hart

Afrikaans

Die taal wat ek koester

Vir nou en altyd

Afrikaans

Jy is myne

Afrkaans

Jy is nou

Afrikaans

Jy is besonders

Afrikaans

Jy is uniek

Afrikaans

Jy is getrou

Afrikaans:

My denke
My wese
My lewe!

~~Nikita~~

lily

Dat alle liefde
Dat alle liefde moet verlore gaan
en wegwaai in die wye lug,
waar hierdie dooie ster sy norse vlug
neem deur die stiltes van sy baan –

dit is die vrees, dit is die eensaamheid
wat my, geboe, met die hande krom
rondom die kersie van ons liefde, stom
laat skuil in kleinlike verlatenheid.

(deur: N.P. van Wyk Louw)

 WAGHONDJIES (Jan F. Celliers)

Ek is hier, en Ma is hier,
Ons twee lê op Baas se baadjie.
Wie is jy?
Kom, loop verby,
Anders word ons knor ‘n daadjie –
Kry jou bene dalk ‘n hap.
Kry jou broekspyp dalk ‘n gaatjie.
Mooipraat? Nee, ons ken jou nie.
Weg jou hand en raak ons nie!
“Oppas,” het die baas gesê,
“Tot ek weer kom, hier bly lê.”
Op ons pootjies lê ons kop,
Maar ons hou jou darem dop.
Toe-oog slaap ons op die baadjie,
Maar ons loer nog deur ‘n gaatjie –
Een oor plat, en een oor op,
PAS-OP!!

Amanda Strydom, South African artist is having a conversation in Afrikaans with a Dutch TV/Radio presenter. Both of them understand one another!

Coenie de Villiers and Steve Hofmeyr singing Afrikaans

nikita.jpg

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