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Posts Tagged ‘South African Poets’

Photo: Mrs Otto Krantz 

One of the women who received the Government’s sanction to join a commando was Mrs. Otto Krantz, the wife of a professional hunter. Mrs. Krantz accompanied her husband to Natal at the commencement of hostilities, and remained in the field during almost the entire campaign in that colony. In the battle of Elandslaagte, where some of the hardest hand-to-hand fighting of the war occurred, this Amazon was by the side of her husband in the thick of the engagement, but escaped unscathed. Later she took part in the battles along the Tugela, and when affairs in the Free State appeared to be threatening she was one of the first to go to the scene of action in that part of the country.

Read on this link more about the women and the boer war.

A people are what its women are. The woman is the conscience of her nation as well as the measure of its values. The moral life of a nation is controlled by the women and by the women can we measure the moral condition of the people. – Postma

I have a very famous poem of a very famous South African poet to celebrate Women’s Day in South Africa. “Die Vrou” – in English “The Woman”. She translated some of her works in English/German/Italian/French and Hebrew and won many prizes in South Africa and in the Netherlands. She was born in 1915 and died in 2007  in Amsterdam. Sarah Raal [picture] was one of those strong women during the South African/British War [Boer War] and she fought alongside the Boer Soldiers. You can read this book written by her:

Die vrou

Somer en herfs en winter trek in wye
onafgebroke wisseling deur die land,
maar sy bly draer van die lente want
liefde het haar verhef bo die getye.

Haat en verwoesting plant hul lamfervlae
in honderd stede en oral sink die nag;
vir háár op wie ook bloed en worsteling wag
klink nog die lied van vrede en welbehae.

Die uitgeteerde ruiter neig sy sens
en aarselend voor die klaarheid van haar blik
erken selfs hy sy heerskappy se grens:

in haar wat die onsterflikheid bewaak
ontkiem die toekoms in die flou getik
van lewe wat voorwêreldlik ontwaak.

Elisabeth Eybers

Tomorrow,  9th August, South Africa celebrate’s Women’s Day. I’ve decided to create a special entry on Women. I have for you photos from family – both sides – dated back just before the 1800’s.

I agree with the above quote from Postma. Women are  the anchor of a nation and if women are not taking the lead when it comes to morals and values, well, then its tjaila-time [like we say in South Africa] for a nation. We as women need to conduct ourselves in a way that our children can look upon us, be proud and so be proud adults too. I’ve come across a very interesting piece of writing and copied part of the article here. The complete article can be read on the given link at the bottom of this entry. 

Mrs G Botha

Mrs General Botha

Mrs G Meyer

Mrs General Meyer

British colonization and its positive, beneficial effects dominated nineteenth-century South African historiography written in English. Dutch settlement, as well as the Great Trek and the founding of the Boer republics, was regarded as peripheral to the saga of British settlement and government at the Cape. Works by Noble (1877) and Wilmot and Chase (1869) remained the standard source material on South African history until G. M. Theal began to publish research based more closely on archival material, during the latter part of the century. The writings of Noble and of Wilmot and Chase portrayed Boers settlers outside the Cape Colony as ignorant, illiterate and cruel, as ‘living on the margin of civilisation’, their ‘moral condition … scarcely higher than the Hottentots or slaves who were household companions’.

During the last quarter of the century, especially after the mineral discoveries and the Boer victories during the Transvaal War of Independence (1880-1), such criticism began to be countered by an apologist approach to the Boers in both English and Dutch historical writings (the latter emanating from the Netherlands as well as the Boer republics). Historians such as Klok, Van der Loo, and Du Plessis took great pains to paint a positive picture of Boer society, drawing close parallels between the Boers and their exemplary European heritage.

In the new historiography Boer women received greater attention. They were described as extremely courageous  and, owing to their sufferings in the past, were considered by some writers to be ‘the greatest patriots’. ‘Taking all the sufferings a mothers and daughters during the early days into account, it is indeed no wonder that it is amongst the female sex, especially amongst the older generation, that the greatest patriots are found’. These authors painted a detailed picture of the simple and unassuming Boer lifestyle, which was presented as an overt sign of a classless and egalitarian society. At the same time, their ordered and structured society was emphasised, by way of countering the negative images mentioned above. Van der Loo, in his work De Geschiedenis der Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek aan het Volk, lavished praise on Boer women. Despite their contact with ‘wild barbarians’ and their isolation from civilisation, they remained true to their traditions of ‘virtue, moral sensibility’ political independence and free institutions’. An added dimension was their purported racial superiority and purity. Symbol of her racial purity, the white complexion of the Boer woman – despite exposure to the African wilderness – was highlighted by Lion Cachet, who maintained ‘a Transvaal woman is, for Africa white’ . This feature was likewise stress Klok in his description of Boer women. He also paid attention to their lips, implicitly contrasting them with Negroid features: ‘thin lips, a round chin and a white neck…. Seldom does one see ugly, that is, really ugly women’.

In the projects of these men there is a clear convergence between the development of the ideal of the volksmoeder and the rise of Afrikaner nationalism. In 1918 Postma (then retired because of ill-health) was requested by two Afrikaner organizations, the Nasionale Helpmekaar4 and the Kultuurvereniging of Reddersburg, to write a book entitled Die Boervrouw, Moeder van Haar Volk (The Boer Woman, the Mother of her Nation). The timing of this publication was important. It followed on the unveiling of the Vrouemonument, the Rebellion of 1914 and the termination of the First World War. The war was a significant event in the history of Afrikaner nationalism, for it was during this time that secondary industry, in particular labour intensive industries utilising mainly cheap female labour, began to flourish in South Africa. At the same time, a population explosion in the Afrikaner community, coinciding with the impoverishment of the rural areas, resulted in a massive influx of young, mostly unskilled Afrikaner men and women to this labour market in the urban areas. The presence of these unsupervised and unattached young men and women in the cities gave rise to grave concern for their moral safety in state, church and welfare organisations. In this social context, the characteristics of the Boervrouw as enumerated by Postma gained particular relevance for reformers, cultural entrepreneurs and concerned Afrikaners in general. His book was both an articulation of the already established image of the volksmoeder and a glorification of Afrikaner women, aimed at the instruction of Afrikaner youth and young girls in particular. In his writing the volksmoeder ideal was propagated as a role model for a new generation of women. This involved the emulation of characteristics such as a sense of religion, bravery, a love of freedom, the spirit of sacrifice, self-reliance, housewifeliness (huismoederlikheid), nurturance of talents, integrity, virtue and the setting of an exam others. Of particular significance is that Postma extended the prevailing notion of ideal womanhood to include their nurturing of the volk as well. For the first time the Boer woman’s role as mother and central focus of her family was expanded to include the concept of Boer women as mothers of the nation: The motherhood of the Boer woman extends itself to her volk just as it does to her child’ (Postma, 1918 164; translated). To substantiate his argument he cited the demonstration of Afrikaner women at the Union Buildings in 1915, when a delegation marched to Pretoria to protest against the capture imprisonment of General Christiaan de Wet as a rebel. The idea of demonstration had originated with women suitably connected prominent men and thus well qualified to be regarded as mothers of the nation’ – Mrs. Joubert, wife of the famous Boer general, and Elsie Eloff, the daughter of the late President Kruger. Yet the way in which Postman saw the demonstration taking form portrays a revealing disregard for the women’s initiative: ‘In true womanly fashion the call was complied with, without delay, not taking account of expense or trouble. Love called, love obeyed’ . The limitations of Postma’s perception of the women’s action are evident in these words: women did not argue, they did not stop to consider the consequences and they did not calculate the cost or the trouble of their actions. They were motivated irrationally, solely by love. But having disregarded any political significance in the women’s action, Postma weeded to link the moral strength of the Afrikaner people to that its women: ‘A people are what its women are. The woman is the conscience of her nation as well as the measure of its values. The moral life of a nation is controlled by the women, and by the women can we measure the moral condition of the people’ .

…. In it many of the characteristics already outlined by Postma emerge: Afrikaner women had a purifying and ennobling influence on their menfolk; they would sacrifice much for their families and were loyal housewives and tender nurses, earnest in prayer, sage in advice, with sat love of freedom and steadfastly anti-British. Stockenstrom maintained adamantly that Voortrekker women were ire of their calling as volksmoeders: ‘The women profoundly realised that they were the mothers of the future Afrikaner nation, and were fully conscious of the fact that their children and grand-children could never develop into a virtuous and glorious nation unless they were absolutely independent and free’.

Click HERE to read the complete article on the site of SA History Org za.

Photo: A Teacher and her class – 1913, this image is from the same site as the website where you can read about Elizabeth Russel Cameron [next picture]. She was a remarkable lady and her history is a must read! You can read how she obtained the right to vote in a time in South Africa when women were not allowed to vote, but that was not the reason for what she’s done. 

Image:http://www.mpumalangahappenings.co.za/pilgrimsrest_characters.htm

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chicken

English Readers – enjoy the chicken jokes in this post. This post is mainly Afrikaans. There is an Afrikaans song too – about chickens – sung by a Capetonion. I really enjoy this song and the Afrikaans is typical of the Cape Coloureds. I love their accent and the way they express themselves, it’s very unique and very colourful. I have two Afrikaans poems too. When I was at primary school, we learned many poems by heart and these two are still fresh in my mind as I enjoyed the word-play and the way the poets expressed themselves. You do miss out  if you can’t read Afrikaans,  as Blum’s poem  is rich in humour.

Chicken_Other_Side

So why did the chicken cross the road?

Aristotle:  To actualize its potential.
Julius Caesar:  To come, to see, to conquer.
Rene Descartes:  It had sufficient reason to believe it was dreaming anyway.
Dr. Seuss:   Did the chicken cross the road?
Did he cross it with a toad?
Yes! The chicken crossed the road,
but why it crossed, I’ve not been told!
Bill Gates:   I have just released Chicken XP, which will not only cross roads, but will lay eggs, file your important documents, and balance your check book — and Explorer is an inextricable part of the operating system.
Plato: For the greater good.
Karl Marx:   It was a historical inevitability.
Nietzsche:   Because if you gaze too long across the Road, the Road gazes also across you.
Carl Jung:   The confluence of events in the cultural gestalt necessitated that individual chickens cross roads at this historical juncture, and therefore synchronicitously brought such occurrences into being.
Albert Einstein:  Whether the chicken crossed the road or the road crossed the chicken depends upon your frame of reference.
David Hume:   Out of custom and habit.
Mark Twain:   The news of its crossing has been greatly exaggerated.
William Shakespeare: I don’t know why, but methinks without much ado. William Wordsworth:  To have something to recollect in tranquility.

Jokes and cartoon: Randyshomestead

Peter Emil Julius Blum was born on 4 May 1925 in Trieste, Italy. Blum arrived in South Africa as a child. At this time, he was already able to speak several languages, among others German and Italian. After his studies in Cape Town and Stellenbosch, he took up a position as a librarian in Cape Town.

Blum got married in 1955 to Henrietta Cecilia Smit, who was an art teacher.He wrote and published several articles and poems, which were not always uncontroversial. His success as a poet was first affirmed in 1956 when he won the Reina Prinsen Geerligs Prize for his volume Steenbok tot poolsee (the title being a reference to the Tropic of Capricorn and the southern Antarctic Ocean, relating to the geographical location of South and Southern Africa). Source: Wikipedia

Peter Blum – Image: Stellenboschwriters

Chicken Joke

chicken cross road

Chicken Life Cycle - Input Output and Kaput

Horror Movie - chicken in microwave

Die miljenêr se kombuis

‘n Pellie van my, wa da’ wêk as kok,
het my vandag laat inloer innie huis
vannie ou miljenêr,sy baas. Kombuis?
Jy sou gasê het dis die Duncan-dok!

Tsaaina en messegoed tot anie nok,
Fridzidêrs volgaprop met piekfyn vleis,
Eiers,vrugta en groentes van ‘n soort bok!

Toe sê hy, “Ennie kjeller’s die ena kroeg –
Whisky en brannewyn ,dzien en muskedil.”
Toe sê ek , Wragtie , diè baas is gaseën!

Ga’ hy nou patie skop? Daa’s oorganoeg
Om twintag ouens ‘n week lank te laat smul.
“Nei” , sê hy ,”die baas eet altyd alleen.”

Peter Blum

DIE DUNCAN VAN DIE DUNCAN-DOK

Sir Patrick Duncan het in April 1937 goewerneur-generaal geword. Hy is benoem deur die toenmalige eerste minister, J.B.M. Hertzog.

Hoewel hy in Engeland gebore is, het Duncan die grootste gedeelte van sy volwasse lewe in Suid-Afrika deurgebring, waar hy onder meer as minister van binnelandse sake, onderwys en openbare werke en later minister van mynwese gedien het.

Na afloop van die Anglo-Boereoorlog, waar hy onder lord Alfred Milner ge­dien het, het hy ’n tyd lank as prokureur in Johannesburg gewerk.
Duncan is op 17 Julie 1943 oorlede.
Sy graf is by die Portnet-gebou in die Kaapse hawe en kan deur die publiek besoek word.
http://jv.dieburger.com//Stories/News/19.0.1563301634.aspx
Bronne: http://www.lib.uct.ac.za; http://www.sahistory.org.za.

Dankie aan Skoor en Sigeuner vir al die moeite met die vind van hierdie gedig deur Peter Blum. Op hierdie link van Skoor se blog kan julle die gesprekke gaan opvolg…natuurlik was my brein bietjie verroes ook en het ek hierdie twee gedigte op ‘n stadium gemeng! [hehe] Spesiale dankie aan Skoor vir die pragtige Afrikaanse musiek wat sy aangestuur het en vir Sigeuner se massiewe soektog – haar FBI-agente inkluis! – na die gedig. Talle e-posse het tussen my en Sigeneur heen-en-weer gevlieg en tussen haar besige, dolle, gejaagde  lewe – met kinders en huiswerk tussen-in, het sy nogtans tyd gemaak om ook Sherlok Houms  en haar ondergrondse Mafia agente nader te trek in hierdie soektog![hehe] Dankie Sigeuner! Ek geniet die taal van die Kaapse Kleurlinge en hoe hulle hulself uitdruk – vol humor en ek kan my verluister aan hulle. Geniet die Hoender song van die CD wat Skoor my gestuur het.

Chicken dance

Kaalvoet Klonkie – ID du Plessis 

Verflenterde kaalvoet klonkie
Wat groente verkoop in die reën,
Met jou lelike skurwe tone
En jou lendelam hoepelbeen,
Jy kom met jou venterliedjie
Deur die mistige Kaapse straat
En helder sing jy die woorde
Op jou eie koddige maat:

Lekka, lekka ywe,
Laat die ghantang nadderskywe!
Tamaties en ywe vars van die Strand
En baie kiri slam by die huis se kant!

Jy kom uit die deel van die Kanaldorp
Waar die dieners gewapend moet gaan
En die weerlig van `n skeermeslem
In `n donker hoek neer mag slaan.
Miskien kon jy :Bismillah” sê
Vanmôre, omdat in die kas
Wat dae lank so leeg moet bly,
Daar weer `n broodjie was?
Of dink jy al aan Nuwejaar
As die troepe deur Waalstraat stroom
Van die Bo-Kaap na die Onder-Kaap
Langs die stomp van die slaweboom?
Is dit wat jou so laat bokspring
En dans op jou hoepelbeen,
Verflenterde kaalvoet klonkie,
As jy groente verkoop in die reën?
Ek hou van jou vrolike klanke
Waarmee jy die winter tart.
Sing jy hierdie ligte deuntjie
Bo `n somberte in jou hart?
En as jy op na die Boereplein
Met jou boepens-mandjie gaan,
Dan trek jou parmantige liedjie
Deur die strate agter jou aan:

Lekka, lekka ywe,
Laat die ghantang nadderskywe!
Tamaties en ywe vars van die Strand
En baie kiri slam by die huis se kant!

lekka lekka ywe

Lekka Lekka ywe!

Chicken Art by Alexis Bester

Chicken art – by Alexis Bester

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bloedrivier

Image: geni.com
The Laager…of the Trekkers…at the Ncome river. Read on the Wiki-link more about this battle. All links in this post will open in a new window.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Blood_River

Today, 16th December, is an important day in the history of South Africa. In 1838 a battle was fought on the banks of the River Ncome. The battle was won by a small number of Trekkers vs thousands of Zulus. Previously, this day was called the Day of the Covenant, now it’s called Reconciliation Day. This day will always remind us of our forefathers that sought a better life.  History is one thing you can’t change. Governments can change, people can change, but not history.

Day of the Vow.
Read on this
WIKI-link more about the 16th December, the Day of the Vow. On this next link you can read about the Boer War on my blog.

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2007/09/23/boer-war-art-poetry-and-history/

On 16 December 1838 where a meagre force of 470 Voortrekkers defeated an army of ten thousand Zulus under the command of Dingane. Only three Voortrekkers were wounded, and some 3,000 Zulu warriors were killed.
After suffering heavy losses at the hands of the warriors of Zulu King Dingane (c. 1795-1840), a Voortrekker commando advanced against the former in December 1838. As it was evident that they would be faced by superior enemy numbers, the Voortrekkers were induced by A.W.J. Pretorius (1798-1853) and S.A. Cilliers (1801-1871), to enter into a covenant with God. Its exact words were not recorded, but eyewitnesses’ later versions concurred that God had been requested to assist them in vanquishing the Zulu Army. Should they be victorious, the Voortrekkers undertook that they and their descendants would annually dedicate the day of the conquest to the glory of God alone. The Battle of Blood River took place on 16 December 1838, marking the Voortrekkers’ desired victory. On the same day, the Covenant was fulfilled for the first time on the very battlefield. Thus the oldest Afrikaner national celebration, later known as Dingaan’s Day or Day of the Covenant, came about.
Initially the Covenant was commemorated in a small way by families and religious associates. In 1864 the General Synod of the Afrikaners’ Natal Churches agreed that 16 December would henceforth be celebrated as ecclesiastical day of thanksgiving by all its congregations. This was the result of the efforts of two Dutch clergymen and supporters of Revival Theology, namely Revs. D.P.M. Huet (1827-1895) and F.L. Cachet (1835-1899). In 1865 the Executive Counsel of the South African Republic declared 16 December to be a public holiday in this Boer Republic. During the Anglo Transvaal (1880-1881) and Anglo Boer Wars (1899-1902), the commemoration of the Covenant inspired Afrikaners. The celebrations acquired a deeply nationalistic significance. A growing number of Covenant ceremonies were annually being organised throughout the Boer Republics and northern Natal. In 1894 the Government of the Free State also declared 16 December to be a public holiday. English-speaking compatriots and members of other races in general attached little importance to the Covenant, normally utilising 16 December for recreational purposes only. In 1910 an act was passed by Parliament according to which 16 December would be celebrated as a national holiday (Dingaan’s Day) throughout the Union of South Africa, as of 1911.

The celebration of the Covenant of 1838 has had an inestimable influence on Afrikaner and even South African cultural history. It played an important religious, national, social and educational role in everyday life, stimulating and shaping the Afrikaner’s creativity, historical consciousness, ethics and intercultural relations. In 1952 the name of the day was changed from Dingaan’s Day to Day of the Covenant. After 1994, in post-apartheid South Africa, it has still remained a public holiday, even though it is now known as Day of Reconciliation. The fact that it has been retained as a holiday is regarded as a significant gesture of goodwill towards Afrikaners.

On this next link you can read a Master’s Dissertation..in Afrikaans about the Vow and the meaning.
http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-07242003-161607/


Image: Wikimedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_of_the_Vow

On this image the Vow can be read…in Dutch.

English: Here we stand before the holy God of heaven and earth, to make a vow to Him that, if He will protect us and give our enemy into our hand, we shall keep this day and date every year as a day of thanksgiving like a sabbath, and that we shall erect a house to His honour wherever it should please Him, and that we also will tell our children that they should share in that with us in memory for future generations. For the honour of His name will be glorified by giving Him the fame and honour for the victory.

Blood River - painting

Blood River – painting

 Image: southafrica-travel.net
On
this link you can read more about King Dingane, the Zulu king and Piet Retief,  battles that were fought, also about the Battle of Weenen in South Africa’s history.

Voortrekker Monument Pretoria

Blood River: Voortrekker Monument Pretoria

Image:http://picasaweb.google.com/Korostrand/VoortrekkerMonument

Blood River painting

Blood River painting

Image: debruinfamily.com/DieGrootTrek/

‘Outa Flink’

Oktober 2010:  Hierdie foto van ‘Outa Flink’ is deur die Voortrekker/Msunduzi Museum, Pietermaritzburg aan my verskaf en ek wil graag vir Elrica Olivier daar bedank! Volgens inligting is ‘Outa Flink’ tydens die Slag van Bloedrivier gevange geneem en het hy vir Schalk Burger gewerk en is hy op die plaas Goedgedacht begrawe! [Goedgedacht is waar ek groot geword het!] Ons is tans besig om meer inligting oor ‘Outa Flink’ te bekom as ook die Gelofte Kerkie. 

Update oor Outa Flink

Hy het op die plaas vir Schalk Burger gewerk. Hy is dood as gevolg van ouderdom en het daar bly woon na die ABO omdat sy familie nie opgespoor kon word nie. Schalk Burger het hom oor hom ontferm en basies vir hom ‘gesorg’.

‘Bloedrivier’

In 1838 is God se hulp gevra om die boere in hul nood te steun, te behoed en te bewaar
‘n Monument sal hulle bou en die dag sal heilig bly,
Hul grootste wapen – hul geloof – met die Here aan hul sy …

Die nag was kul en donker, die impi’s staan en wag,
die lampies op die ossewaens soos Mahlozi’s in die nag
‘n Strandwolf sluip daar tussendeur, hy’s onheilspellend daar
Die mis sak toe, die vyand druis, hul wag op die bevel.

In die geslote walaer, in ‘n see van heidendom
is daar ‘n lig wat helder skyn – die lig van Christendom.
Die stemme van ‘n mannekoor weerklink deur digte mis
Psalm agt-en-dertig, stel almal weer gerus.

KOOR
Maar dieselfde God van Bloedrivier is steeds ons God vandag
Hy verstaan ons grootste vrese, Hy staan by ons deur die nag
Kom ons almal vat weer hande, erken sy grote Mag
Want dieselfde God van Bloedrivier is steeds met ons vandag

Twee skote van ‘n dubbel-loop, die stryd het pas begin
Die isilongo kondig aan Dingaan – ons sal oorwin
Maar God ons Vader is met ons, die vyand word verslaan
Die veld drink bloed, soos op Golgota – dit moet ons verstaan

KOOR
Maar dieselfde God van Bloedrivier is steeds ons God vandag
Hy verstaan ons grootste vrese, Hy staan by ons deur die nag
Kom ons almal vat weer hande, erken sy grote Mag
Want dieselfde God van Bloedrivier is steeds met ons vandag

The Battle Of Blood River
A word of thousands of Zulus on their way,
Made the boere’s wives ready to pray,
The question: to meet them or to wait?
That was Cilliers and Andries’ debate.

464 Boere waited quietly and shiver,
Next to a donga and the Ncome river.
That evening around the laager the mist lay,
But ghostly lamps kept the zulus at bay.

As dawn finally broke on a Sunday,
All of Zululand sat there that day.
10 000 Zulu warriors ready for blood,
Running to fight through the river’s mud!

Andries Pretorius was the boer leader,
The Zulus attacked without a breather.
Assagai and the long throwing spear,
Had the single shot boer Muskets in fear.

Dambuza and Ndlela’s thousands of zulu men,
Made Pretorius feel they’re in the lion’s den.
Zulus shot running through the river’s mud,
Made the river’s water turn to human blood.

The boere prayed and asked the Lord in fear,
To deliver them from the zulu spear.
Vowed to build a church and always remember
To Sabbath the date of 16 December.

Two hours later and 4 waves of spears,
Pretorius’ men let go of their fears.
Chased after the zulus as they scattered.
Truly that day the warriors got battered.

Dead bodies in the field that day was rife,
But 464 of God’s children was alive.
Although three was injured and lying in bed.
More than 3000 zulus was counted as dead.
Written by Louis van Niekerk on 05 October 2009
http://sites.google.com/site/louispvanniekerk/Home/poetry/english/the-battle-of-blood-river

Die volgende inligting kom van die Bloedrivier.org website.

Wie was daar met die slag van Bloedrivier?
Soek gerus jou famielie naam op, hul bloed vloei nog daagliks deur jou are !

Met erkenning aan Johann Janse van Rensburg en byvoegings deur Gerhard Swart. (bloedrivier.org)

Hier volg ‘n lys van 351 persone van die totale getal van 464 (verwys #) blanke krygers en die 59 kleurlinge wat aan die slag van Bloedrivier op 16 Desember 1838 deelgeneem het.

Waar moontlik word die persoon se genealogiese nommer ook verskaf. (BRON (verwys ##): Die Bloedrivierse Eeufeesgedenkboek opgestel deur A.C. du Toit en Dr. Louis Steenkamp, die lys is verder bygewerk deur die Genealogiese Genootskap van Suid-Afrika – N-Tvl Tak.)

Hoofkommandant:
1. Pretorius Andries Wilhelmus Jacobus (verwys nota 1) (b3c1d5e11)

Assistent-HoofKmdt:
2. Landman Karel Pieter (b2c10)

Kommandante:
3. Jacobsz Pieter Daniel(a15b5c3d8e1)
4. de Lange Johan Hendrik (Hans Dons)(b10c2)
5. Potgieter Jacobus (Koos)
6. Erasmus Stephanus Petrus
7. Uys Jacobus Johannes(b1c5d2e4)
8. Meyer Lucas Johannes

Laerkommandante:
9. Pretorius Albertus (ook kannonnier)
10. Erasmus Lourens
11. Moolman Piet (Rooi Piet)
12. Fronemann Christoffel Cornelis (b7)

Veldkornette:
13. Steyn Johannes C
14. Viljoen Gert
15. Pretorius Hercules Albertus (Bart)(b3c1d5e14) Broer van AWJ Pretorius (kanonier)
16. van Staden Gert (verwys nota 2)
17. Lombard Hermanus Stephanus
18. Scheepers Jan
19. Fourie Hermanus
20. Cowie William (a1)
21. Labuschagne Casper
22. Joubert Jan (ook kanonnier)

Godsdiensleiers:
23. Cilliers Sarel Arnoldus(b2c1d7e4)
24. du Plessis Johannes (Jan) (ook ‘n Veldkornet)
25. Joubert Pieter Jacobus (b10c6d9 moontlik)

Kanonniers:
26. Rudolph Petrus Johannes (b1c1d2)
27. Pretorius Gerhardus

Manskappe:
28. Aucamp Piet

29. Badenhorst Hendrik
30. Badenhorst P
31. Bantjes Jan Gerritze (b1c3d3)
32. Bantjies I
33. Beneke Johannes
34. Bester Barend Jacobus (b4c3d4e3) (sneuwel by slag van Umfolozi)
35. Bester Lourens ERasmus (b4c3d4e2)
36. Bester Paul Ma(i)chiel (b4c3d4e1)
37. Bezuidenhout Daniel Pieter
38. Biddulph Thomas Jervis (a1)
39. Bierman Isak
40. Biggar Alexander Harvey (a1) (sneuwel by slag van Umfolozi)
41. Bodes Barend Hendrik
42. Bornman Johannes Jurgens (b1c3)
43. Boshoff Jakobus (Jan)
44. Botha Ernst Adriaan Lodewyk (b1c7d1e15)
45. Botha Hendrik
46. Botha J C
47. Botha Jan
48. Botha L
49. Botha P J
50. Botha P R
51. Botha T F
52. Botha Theunis
53. Bothma Carel A
54. Bothma Daniel
55. Breytenbach Chris
56. Breytenbach Izaak Johannes (b4c1d4)
57. Breytenbach Jacob Coenraad
58. Breytenbach Johan Hendrik
59. Breytenbach Johannes Jacobus
60. Bronkhorst Johannes Jacobus (b6c6)
61. Bronkhorst Johannes Jacobus (b6c6d4)
62. Bronkhorst Samuel Johannes (b6c6d9)
63. Bruwer Eduard Christiaan Daniel (b7c4d12)
64. Bruwer Hans
65. Bruyn Piet
66. Buitendagh Carel Hendrik
67. Burger Jacobus Johannes
68. Burger Schalk Willem
69. Buys Piet

70. Claassens Christiaan Cornelis
71. Coetzee Cornelis (P-zn)
72. Coetzer Johannes Jacobus
73. Coetzer Philippus Jeremias
74. Coetzer Thys
75. Combrinck Gerhardus Hermanus Jacobus
76. Cronje Abraham Martinus
77. Cronje Piet

78. Davel Henning
79. Davel Jan
80. Dannhauser Thomas Richard (b6)
81. de Beer Christiaan Marthinus (Snr)
82. de Beer Abraham Samuel Jacobus
83. de Beer Christiaan Marthinus (Jnr)
84. de Beer Johannes (Jan) Christiaan
85. de Beer Johannes Adam
86. de Beer Stephanus A (Snr)
87. de Beer Zacharias Jacobus
88. de Bruyn Petrus Frederik
89. de Clercq Abraham Johannes
90. de Clercq Barend Jacobus
91. de Clercq Cornelis
92. de Clercq Jacob (b6c3d5)
93 de Clercg Johannes Wilhelmus
94. de Jager Frederick Johannes
95. de Jager Izak J
96. de Jager Johannes Wilhelmus (b1c11d5e5)
97. de Jager Lodewyk
98. de Lange Adriaan (Jnr)
99. de Lange Adriaan Jacobus (Snr, Hans Dons se broer)
100. de Lange Robertus Burnet (Broer van Hans Dons)
101. de Wet Kootjie
102. de Wet Pieter
103. de Winnaar Carel Stephanus
104. Dreyer Christiaan Lourens Sr.
105. Dreyer F
106. Dreyer I
107. du Plessis Francois
108. du Plessis Johannes (Jan)
109. du Plessis Pieter
110. du Plooy Hendrik
111. du Plooy Cornelis Willem
112. du Plooy Dirk Wouter
113. du Preez Pieter Daniel Andreas Salomon
114. Deysel F

115. Engelbregt Adriaan Stephanus
116. Engelbregt E
117. Engelbregt Gerhardus Johannes
118. Engelbregt H (jong)
119. Engelbregt H H (Snr)
120. Engelbregt Johannes Hendrik
121. Enslin Johannes Jacobus
122. Erasmus Antonie Philippus
123. Erasmus Barend Christoffel
124. Erasmus Cornelis Johannes
125. Erasmus Daniel Elardus
126. Erasmus Hans
127. Erasmus Jacobus
128. Erasmus Pieter ERasmus
129. Erasmus Stephanus E
130. Esterhuizen Jan Christoffel

131. Ferreira Marthinus Stephanus
132. Fick Hendrik (JC?)
133. Fisher Jan
134. Fourie Christiaan Erns
135. Fourie Dirk S
136. Fourie Hermanus
137. Fourie Philip Jacobus (Gewond tydens slag van Bloedrivier)
138. Fourie MVA

139. Garden Kapt. (Engels)
140. Geers Carel Frederik Christoffel (of Geer)
141. Geere Johannes (Jan) Coenraad Jonas
142. Giezing Fredrich (a1)
143. Goosen Marthinus2
144. Gouws Daniel
145. Gouws Jacob I
146. Gouws Jacob Marthinus
147. Gouws Pieter Marthinus
148. Greyling Jan Cristoffel (b11c2d3)
149. Greyling Pieter Jacobus (b11c2d2)
150. Grobbelaar Nicolaas (b9c11)
151. Grobbelaar Pieter Schalk (b9c11d2)
152. Grobler J
153. Grove Hermanus Gerhardus (b3c9d5)

154. Hammes Pieter Johannes (b1c2)
155. Hattingh Christiaan
156. Hattingh Francois (b8c7d4e1)
157. Hattingh Johannes Dewald
158. Hattingh Johannes Hendrik (Hans) (b11c1d2e1)
159. Herbst Marthinus Johannes Hendrik
160. Heydenreich Cornelis Frederik (b6c2d2)
161. Human Petrus Gerhardus

162. Jacobs Gabriel Gerhardus Nicholaas Nic (a15b5c3d8e1f7) (Kmdt. Jacobz se seun)
163. Jacobs Pieter Daniel (a15b5c3d8e1f2)
164. Jacobsz Jan (Kmdt. Jacobz se seun)
165. Janse van Rensburg Lukas Marthinus
166. Janse van Rensburg Nicolaas Marthinus (C-zn)
167. Janse van Rensburg Willem Cornelis
168. Janse van Vuren Luckas (of Lucas) Gerhardus
169. Janszen Willem
170. Jordaan Willem
171. Joubert Abraham Benjamin
172. Joubert Gideon
173. Joubert Jan (Jacs-zn)
174. Joubert Jan (jnr.)
175. Joyce Robert (a3)

176. Kemp Gerhardus Philippus
177. Kemp Jacobus Frederik
178. Kemp Petrus Johannes
179. Kilian Justus Daniel (Nageslag boer steeds op Vryheid)
180. Klaassen P
181. Klopper Hendrik Balthazar
182. Klopper Jacobus Marthinus
183. Klopper Johan Christiaan
184. Koekemoer C
185. Koekemoer Marthinus
186. Kritzinger Lewis
187. Kritziinger Matthys S B
188. Kruger Jan
189. Kruger Pieter Ernst
190. Kruger Tobias Johannes

191. Laas Cornelius Johannes
192. Laas C Mathys
193. Laas JAM
194. Labuschagne J P
195. Labuschagne Jan Harm (Jan Groen)
196. Labuschagne Willem Adriaan
197. Landman Jan A Karel Pieter (Snr)
198. Landman Jan (Doringberg)
199. le Roux D
200. le Roux Nicolaas (verwys nota 2)
201. Leech
202. Liebenberg Christiaan Jacobus (b2bc2d2e2)
203. Liebenberg Christiaan Jacobus (b2c2d6)
204. Lindeque Gerrit Johannes (Snr)
205. Lindeque Petrus
206. Lombard Hans
207. Lombard Hermanus Antonie
208. Lombard S
209. Lotter Johannes (Lotter Jacob?)
210. Ludick M J

211. Malan Daniel Jacob Johannes
212. Malan David Daniel
213. Malan Jacob Jacobus
214. Malan Stephanus Marcus F
215. Marais Coenraad
216. Marais Johannes L
217. Marais Stephanus Abraham
218. Marais F
219. Marcus F
220. Mare Wynand Wilhelmus (b9c7d7)
221. Maritz Pieter
222. Maritz Salomon Gerhardus (b1c8d1e2)
223. Maritz Salomon Stephanus (b1c8d2e1)
224. Martens Hendrik Jacobus (a5b1c7)
225. Martens Jan Thomas (snr) (a5b1c6)
226. Martens Jan Thomas (jnr)
227. Marx Frans Engelbertus (b3c6d4)
228. Meintjes Albertus Jacobus
229. Meinties Jacobus William
230. Meintjes Schalk Willem
231. Mey Christiaan Lodewyk
232. Meyer Adriaan Willem Petrus
233. Meyer Jacob
234. Meyer Jan
235. Meyer Lukas (L-zn)
236. Meyer Theodorus
237. Mienie Frederik Christiaan
238. Mienie Johannes
240. Moolman I
241. Moolman Adriaan Izak
242. Moolman Jacobus Philippus
243. Muller Johannes Christiaan (moontlik a1b5c7d4)
244. Muller Jan (moontlik a11b2)

245. Naude Jacob
246. Naude Philip Jacobus
247. Naude Francois Paulus
248. Neethling Hendrik Ludolf
249. Neethling Schalk Willem
250. Neethling Willem Hendrik
251. Nel Louis Jacobus
252. Nell Theunis Jacobus
253. Nell Willem Gabriel
254. Nortje Joachim

Oberholzer Jan Albert
Olivier (Lang) Gert
Olivier Ockert
Oosthuizen A
Oosthuizen Jan (J-zn) (verwys nota 2)
Oosthuizen J J (Snr)
Oosthuizen Marthinus Jacobus (b1c4d7e2)
Opperman C
Opperman D
Parker Edward
Pieters Coenraad
Pieterse Frederik
Pieterse H J
Pieterse Nicolaas
Potgieter Cornelis
Potgieter Evert F
Potgieter Hendrik
Potgieter Jurgen
Potgieter Matthys
Potgieter Petrus Hendrik Theunis
Potgieter Theodorus
Pretorius A P
Pretorius Barend
Pretorius Dewald Johannes (b3c1d2e4f4)
Pretorius Gideon
Pretorius Henning Petrus Nicolaas (b3c1d5e12)
Pretorius Marthinus Wessel (b3c1d5e11f1)
Pretorius Nicolaas
Pretorius Petrus Gerhardus (b3c9d7)
Pretorius Petrus Gerhardus (b3c9d7e2)
Pretorius Samuel
Pretorius Willem H
Pretorius Willem Jacobus
Prinsloo Jochemus Johannes Petr (b2c3d6e1f3)
Prinsloo N J
Prinsloo Willem P
Raads D
Raath Philip
Raath Pieter
Raath Roelof
Raatz Gerrit1
Ranger Simon
Reineke Adam
Retief Jacobus
Robbertse I
Robbertse Jan
Robbertse Matthys
Roets Hendrik
Rood
Roos Cornelis J
Roos Gysbert
Roscher P
Roux Dirk
Rudolph Jacobus Andreas (b1c3)
Rudolph Johann(es)Bernard (b1c1)
Rudolph Gerhardus Jacobus (b1c2)
Scheepers Coenraad F(swaer v. Erasmus Smit)
Scheepers Gert
Scheepers H
Scheepers J A
Scheepers Jacobus Johannes
Scheepers Stephanus Johannes
Scheepers M (G-zn)
Scheepers Marthinus
Schoeman Gert

Schoeman Johannes
Schutte Jan Harm Thomas
Slabbert G
Smit Andries Adriaan
Smit Chr. (C-zn)
Smith F
Snyman Coenraad F W (b7c4d9e7)
Snyman J H
Steenkamp Hermanus
Steenkamp Jan Harm (b7c2d3e2)
Steenkamp Piet L
Steenkamp Thomas Ignatius
Steyn Hermanus
Steyn Johannes Christoffel
Steyn Pieter
Strydom D J
Strydom Hendrik
Strydom J
Strydom Pieter Gerhardus
Swanepoel Willem
Swart Marius
Swart Pieter Johannes
Uys Dirk Cornelis (b1c5d2e12)
Uys Jacobus Johannes (b1c5d2e4f3)
Uys Jan C
Uys Petrus Lafras (Piet Hlobane)(b1c5d2e3f4)
van den Berg Hendrik (b1c10d6)
van den Berg Hendrik Stephanus (b1c10d6e3)
van der Berg Isak
van der Merwe Andries
van der Merwe C
van der Merwe Christiaan Pieter (verwys nota 3)
van der Merwe Frederik J
van der Merwe Jan
van der Merwe Josias
van der Merwe L P
van der Merwe Lukas J
van der Merwe M
van der Merwe Willem
van der Schyff D
van der Schyff J D
van Deventer Jan (a1b5c10d6)
van Dyk Joseph
van Dyk Sybrand
van Gass Ferdinand Paul George (b1)
van Gass J F
van Jaarsveld A
van Loggerenberg Hendrik
van Niekerk Izak Andries (b3c7d4e4)
van Niekerk J A P
van Niekerk Pieter Johannes
van Rooyen Cornelis J
van Rooyen Dirk
van Rooyen G T
van Rooyen Gert F
van Rooyen Gert Reinier
van Rooyen I
van Rooyen Lukas
van Rooyen Stephanus
van Schalkwyk Christiaan
van Schalkwyk Gert
van Staden Cornelis
van Staden V C
van Straten Jacob
van Venen D
van Vuuren P
van Zyl Jacobus
Venter Albert
Venter C I
Venter P A
Venter Willem Daniel
Vermaak Cornelis
Vermaak J
Viljoen Christoffel
Viljoen Gideon
Viljoen Johan H
Viljoen M
Viljoen Sarel
Visagie Jan
Visser

Notas:
1. Gewond gedurende die slag van Bloedrivier.
2. Dood gedurende die opvolg operasie om Dingaan te probeer vang op 27 Desember 1838.
3. Slegs lig gewond gedurende die slag van Bloedrivier.

Ander brokkies inligting:
Johann Bernhard Rudolph was van die begin van die trek betrokke met die administrasie en is in 1839 as die eerste Weesheer aangewys en in 1842 as Landros van Pietermaritzburg.
Lucas Johannes Meyer aangestel as die eerste Ontvanger van Inkomste.
William Cowie is die persoon na wie Cowie’s Hill naby Pinetown vernoem is.
Thomas Jervis Biddulph was ‘n 1820 Settelaar.
Coenraad Snyman was ‘n fotograaf. Hy was ook baie groot, so groot dat hy nie perd kon ry nie. ‘n Broek van hom is in bewaring by die Gelofte Kerk Museum in PMB.
Hendrik Jacobus Martens is aangestel as die eerste bode van die hof.

# Daar is ook bronne wat verwys na 407 blankes. J.G. Bantjes verwys egter na sowat 464 blanke manskappe uitsluitend die kommandante. Daar is ook bronne wat verwys na sowat 200 swartes wat saam met A.Biggar, E.Parker en R.Joyce aan die geveg kom deelneem het.
## Ander bronne: P.S. de Jongh, Sarel Cilliers; E Smit, Dagboek van Erasmus Smit; J.A. Heese & R.T.J.Lombard, SA Gegeslagsregisters; De Villiers & Pama, Geslagsregisters van ou Kaapse Families; B. Cilliers, Genealogieë van die Afrikaner Families in Natal; SABW 1-5; A. Walker, The Great Trek.

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Image:Brittanica.com

English readers…I’ve translated the first Afrikaans poem for you…then you can slide down to read more in English…

 In die Hoëveld

1. In die Hoëveld, waar dit oop is en die hemel wyd daarbo,
Waar kuddes waaigras huppel oor die veld,
Waar ’n mens nog vry kan asemhaal en aan ’n God kan glo,
Staan my huisie, wat ek moes verlaat vir geld.
En as ek in die gange van die myn hier sit en droom
Van die winde op die Hoëveld, ruim en vry,
Dan hoor ek die geklinkel van my spore, saal en toom,
Sawens as ek bees of skaap toe ry.

On the High-veld

1. In the High-veld where it’s open and heaven’s wide up there
Where herds of tall grass frisk about the veld
Where you can breath freely and believe in God
Stands my little house which I’ve left for money
And If I sit here in the tunnels of the mine, dreaming
About the High-veld wind, wide and free
Then I hear the sound of my tracks, saddle and bridle
At dusk when riding to the livestock.

image:mooikrans.co.za

2.Op die Hoëveld, waar dit wyd is, waar jy baie ver kan sien,
(Die ylblou bring ’n knop dan in jou keel)
Staan my huisie nog en wag vir my, wag al ’n jaar of tien,
Waar die bokkies op die leigrafstene speel.
Maar as die tering kwaai word en ek hoor die laaste fluit,
Dan sweef ek na die Hoëveld op die wind
Ek soek dan in die maanlig al die mooiste plekkies uit
Waar ek kleiosse gemaak het as ’n kind.
Toon van den Heever (1894-1956)

2.On the High-veld, where it’s spacious, where you can see far off
(The wispy blue brings a lump to your throat)
Stands my little house, waiting for me about a year or ten
Where the little deer play on the slate tombstones
But if the tuberculosis gets worse and I hear the last wheeze
I then wander to the High-veld wind
And in the moonlight I seek all the most beautiful places
Where I made clay oxen as a child.
—©Nikita —

Image: kaapland.voortrekkers.org.za/kommandos/stellenbosch

Highveld Sky…image: Eb-art.com Artist: Estelle Botha

Al die gedigte wat nou volg, is NP van Wyk-Louw gedigte!

My venster is ’n blanke vlak

My venster is ’n blanke vlak
in skaduwee en skemering,
waar ek my nagte waak en wag
op magiese deursuiwering:

dat hierdie siel deursigtig word
in vreemde voorgevoelde lig,
tot kring bo kring opglans en straal
in eindelose vergesig;

dat wat ek nog verlore waan,
o my verlore dae in my,
in hierdie stille skemering
hul vorming en gestalte kry,

tot ek my eensaamheid besit,
volmaak, as kosbare gewin,
van duister wense en van smart
die uiterste deurstraalde sin.
N P van Wyk-Louw

VROEGHERFS

Die jaar word ryp in goue akker blare
in wingerd wat verbruin, en witter lug
wat daglank van die nuwe wind en klare
son deurspoel word; elke blom word vrug,
tot self die traagstes; en die eerste blare val
so stilweg in die rook-vaal bos en laan
dat die takke van die lang popliere al
teen elke ligte môre witter staan.
O Heer, laat hierdie dae heilig word:
laat alles val wat pronk en sieraad was
Of enkel jeug en vér was van die pyn;
Laat ryp word Heer, laat U wind waai, laat stort
my waan, tot al die hoogheid eindelik vas
en nakend uit my teerder jeug verskyn.

Osterley Park

Nagreën

Die reën skuifel deur die straat,
verby my venster, mensverlaat …
Soos ’n trossie narsings wat verkwyn,
flikker die druppels teen my vensterruit
waar die geel straatlig daardeur skyn;
en voel die wind
met bleek vingers, soos ’n kind,
aan die swaar gordyn, wat plooi
in die lamplig, teer en droef papawerrooi.

Image: wvs.topleftpixel.com

Grense

My naakte siel wil sonder skrome
in alle eenvoud tot jou gaan,
soos uit diepe slaap ons drome,
soos teen skemerlug die bome
opreik na die bloue maan;

gaan met al sy donker wense,
en die heilige, nooit-gehoorde
dinge sê, waarvoor die mense
huiwer, en wat om die grense
flikker van my duister woorde.

Image: astroden.com/images.htm

Voël

’n Voël vlieg voor my venster verby,
’n naalddun lyn wat daaroor gly
en die glas in twee vlakke sny;

die wêrelde val apart en bly
elk in sy enkelheid geskei –
ek hierbinne, en daarbuite hy.

Die liefde in my

Dis altyd jy, net altyd jy,
die een gedagte bly my by
soos skadu’s onder bome bly,
net altyd jy, net altyd jy.

Langs baie weë gaan my smart,
blind is my oë en verward,
is alle dinge in my hart.

Maar dit sal een en enkeld bly,
en aards en diep sy laafnis kry,
al staan dit winter, kaal in my,
die liefde in my, die liefde in my.


Nog eenmaal

Nog eenmaal wil ek in die skemeraand
weer op ons dorp en by ons dorpsdam staan,
weer met my rek op in die donker skiet,
en luister, en al word ek seer en dof,
hoe die klein klippie ver weg in die riet
uit donker in die donker water plof.
Uit Nuwe verse (1954)

Image:http://www.naboom2germany.co.za/Naboomspruit.htm

Voorspel 1950

Miskien sal ek die wingerd prys
en nooit meer van hom drink
en net in ’n verbeelde glas
die koel gedagte skink:

dié wat in jare donkerte
sy wynsteen kon laat sak
en niks wat somers is meer het
nie pit nie dop of rank:

miskien nog van Gods weë weet:
– Sy paaie en Sy pyn:
maar ingewikkeld alles ken
en mens wil wees én rein.
Uit Tristia (1962)

Afskeid

Jy’t weggegaan en jy bewoon
‘n silwer herberg in die sneeu
jou venster kyk nog elke nag
met drie blink oë na die plein
die plein is boom en wind en boom
en wind en wind
en wintermiddag voer daar iemand
die meeue krummels teen die wind

Uit: Tristia (1962)

English readers:This is my 1000th entry and I want to celebrate it with some beautiful poetry…in Afrikaans…but, there’s some links for you to follow…English/French and other languages…poems to enjoy. There’s a brilliant bird-site for you to enjoy…South African birds…do take a look, it’s worth visiting this site! The poems in this entry are mainly from two wonderful South African well-known poets…and poems I really love. The first poem is about the Highveld and I was 11 years of age and had to know about 4-6 poems every week… to recite on a weekly basis and some were really long…as a child you don’t always understand why you have to learn certain things in life, but now I do appreciate my Afrikaans Language teacher from Primary after all these years, of course we had to learn English poems too…but let’s leave that for later, Afrikaans is a much more beautiful language, especially when it comes to poetry!

On this link here you can read more fantastic poems in different languages…the link will open in a new window.

To see more fantastic bird pictures….please click here and the link will open in a new window. There is an English page as well as an Afrikaans page…the link will open in the English page. If you want the Afrikaans page, you will have to click on “front page”.

This was my 1000th entry…!

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Quite recently I’ve translated a poem written by Wayne Visser into Afrikaans. The poem can be found here with Wayne’s comments:

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/05/21/ek-weet-van-n-plek-in-afrika/

A couple of days ago, he asked me to translate this poem: “I am an African” into Afrikaans and I felt it was an honour to be asked by him to do it. I’ve tried my best, as all my Afrikaans-bloggers know I’m no expert in translations, but I do try to convey the “message” of the poem, but sometimes, specially when not asked to do a translation, I might want to change the poem slightly to what I like, although I will keep the overall “message”, like the poem written by Wordsworth…”I wandered lonely like a cloud.”  Wayne also understands Afrikaans. He liked my interpretation of Wordsworth’s poem and I felt happy that a professional poet could also view his opinion, as you would agree that you sometimes don’t know really if you do any poem justice by translating it. I’ve done some translations from Afrikaans to English too and if you want to read some poems of some of South Africa’s best poets…you can click on the page that says…”my poems-gedigte” and read a few there. You will find Eugene Marais’s poem…”The dance of the rain” and Totius’s poem…”oh the painful thought..” and some others too. I do like to write my own too, which you will find on that page too. I want to stress it out …that I’m no professional, so enjoy whatever you find here and there’s always poetry sites where you can find poems written by professionals! Today, Sunday 7th Sept 2008,  I had two people putting in “Is Wayne Visser an Afrikaans writer” in  a search and were directed to my blog…as far as I could see, he doesn’t write in Afrikaans, I couldn’t find any of his poems or works in Afrikaans, but he does understand the Language…he speaks Afrikaans too. I do hope this helps, you can contact him via his website address…link at the bottom of this post – and email him!

Image: DK-images…Langebaan, Cape Town

Ek is van Afrika

Ek is van Afrika
Nie omdat ek daar gebore is
Maar omdat my hart met Afrika klop
Ek is van Afrika
Nie omdat my gelaat donker is
Maar omdat Afrika my gedagtes omgrens
Ek is van Afrika
Nie omdat ek van haar leef
Maar omdat my siel tuis is – in Afrika

Wanneer Afrika oor haar kinders ween
Is my wange deur traandruppels deurweek
Wanneer Afrika haar voorvaders eer
Buig my hoof in respek daarheen
Wanneer Afrika oor haar slagoffers rou
Is my hande in gebed gevou
Wanneer Afrika haar oorwinnings vier
Dans ek op die maat van die oorwinningslied

Ek is van Afrika
Met haar asemrowende ylblou lugruimtes
Laat sy die toekoms skitterend skyn
Ek is van Afrika
Waar ek gegroet word asof familie
En ek ervaar die gevoel van meervoudig
Ek is van Afrika
Want haar wildheid bring vertroosting vir my siel
En bring my nader na die bron van Lewe

Wanneer Afrika-musiek in die wind weerklink
Volg my polsslag die ritmiese klop
En word ek een met die klank
Wanneer die Afrika-kleure in die son glinster
Verdrink my sintuie in haar reënboog
En is ek die natuur se pallet
Wanneer die Afrika-verhale om die vure op-klink
Volg my voete hul tydlose ‘wink
En is ek die spore van die verle’

Ek is van Afrika
Want sy’s die krip van geboorte
En troetel die oer-oue wysheid
Ek is van Afrika
Want sy leef in die skadu van die wêreld
En brand met ‘n gloeiende inspirasie
Ek is van Afrika
Want sy is die land van môre
En ek eer haar tydlose geskenke

©Nikita — 2nd September 2008

The English version:
I Am An African

I am an African
Not because I was born there
But because my heart beats with Africa’s
I am an African
Not because my skin is black
But because my mind is engaged by Africa
I am an African
Not because I live on its soil
But because my soul is at home in Africa

When Africa weeps for her children
My cheeks are stained with tears
When Africa honours her elders
My head is bowed in respect
When Africa mourns for her victims
My hands are joined in prayer
When Africa celebrates her triumphs
My feet are alive with dancing

I am an African
For her blue skies take my breath away
And my hope for the future is bright
I am an African
For her people greet me as family
And teach me the meaning of community
I am an African
For her wildness quenches my spirit
And brings me closer to the source of life

When the music of Africa beats in the wind
My blood pulses to its rhythm
And I become the essence of sound
When the colours of Africa dazzle in the sun
My senses drink in its rainbow
And I become the palette of nature
When the stories of Africa echo round the fire
My feet walk in its pathways
And I become the footprints of history

I am an African
Because she is the cradle of our birth
And nurtures an ancient wisdom
I am an African
Because she lives in the world’s shadow
And bursts with a radiant luminosity
I am an African
Because she is the land of tomorrow
And I recognise her gifts as sacred

Copywright: Wayne Visser – 2005

Read more of his poetry at: www.waynevisser.com

Images: hotelsbible.com/travellog 19

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English readers: you can find my translation of this first poem on “My Poems-gedigte” page on top of my blog. I hope you will enjoy it.

EENSAAMHEID – JAN F.E. CELLIERS
My vuurtjie en ek is op wag –
my vuurtjie en ek alleen;
die awend-ster
wink al van ver,
en die velde slaap omheen.

En stadigies sterwe die dag,
soos een in sy armoed verlaat,
ongesien, ongeag,
sonder suggie of lag,
waar niemand van weet of van praat.

Nou bly die lug alom
in stil aanbidding staan –
geen tampende bel
wat die ure tel:
net die sterre wat kom en gaan.

Die osse, met koppe gebuie,
herkoue nog stil in die nag,
tot één vir één buk
en gaan lê by sy juk,
met `n sug, ná die trek van die dag.

My vuurtjie is al wat nog leef
in die eindeloos ruim met my,
en sy stemmetjie dwaal
soos `n deuntjie wat draal
om dae lank verby,

om jonkheids blye môre
en laggies lank verlewe.
Dan voel ek `n traan
in my oë staan
en ek fluister: “Heer, vergewe!”

Die slapende velde lê wyd,
en wyer die donker see,
wat my vuurtjie en my
vanawend skei
van die wêreld se vreug en wee;

ek weet daar`s fees vanaand
in menig verligte saal,
maar geeneen wat my mis
by die dans en die dis –
`n balling vergeet en verdwaal.

Maar al is ek, ver van die skaar,
in eensaamheids wonings getrede,
ek voel my soos een
met die Heer alleen –
`n kind aan Sy boesem tevrede.

image: digitalcameraclub.co.za

I’ve read something this morning on Zee’s blog that reminded me about this poem : “Eensaamheid” by Jan F E Celliers I also came accross this poem on a  website and it also reminded me about this very same poem! “Eensaamheid” means…”loneliness…or…solitude…”

Ver op hoë berge
Pagina: 431/431

Ver op hoë berge, o-o-o…
Sit ek eensaam in die nag,
by my vuurtjie stil op wag,
ver op hoë berge.

‘k Denk nou kom my liefste, o-o-o…
k’ Sie van verre kom die wa,
die my liefste skat daar dra,
ver op hoë berge.

Droom is weer voorbij nou, o-o-o…
‘k Sit weer eensaam in die nag,
by my vuurtjie stil op wag,
ver op hoë berge.
http://www.carpegeel.be/lied.aspx?id=857

Read on WIKIPEDIA more about him.
Kliek 
HIER vir meer gedigte deur Celliers…
Enjoy the music of Sweet People …terwyl jy  “Eensaamheid” lees

On THIS LINK on my blog- you can read two poems of Jan FE Celliers.

Afrikaanse kindergedig!
Digter? Wie kan help?  Titel?
Daar stap ‘n klein mannetjie
In die rigting van die klotsende waterstroompie
Hy het ‘n emmer in sy handjie
En jy hoor net:die suisende windjie!

Hy stap, voete slepend
Hy stap, tande knersend
Hy draf, voete knarsend
Hy draf, hande swaaiend

Oppad hoor hy ‘n kwetterende voëltjie
Hy val skielik: kaplaks!
Daar lê hy onderstebo op die bruggie
“Ai”, sê hy, “dis seer”, vervlaks!

Nou loop ons klein ou mannetjie
Baie stadig, hy sien hy ‘n bobbejaan
Wat al blaffend en al strompelend
KADOEF! en PARDOEF!
Teen ‘n boomstomp kom gejaa’n

Die kabbellende rivierstroompie
Stroom al jubelend oor die klippies
Daarnaas is ‘n verdwaalde lam
Hy blêr! Ai tog! Dis ‘n ram!

Oppad terug stap die mannetjie
Met sy kleine, swaaiende kannetjie
Geluidloos deur die woud heen en weer
Wat het geword van die brullende
En krakende donderweer?

Ek weet! Die sissende slange
En kwakende padda
Het almal op skrik gejaag
KABOEM! Daar blits hy
SJADOEF! Daar flits hy

~~~~~~

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English readers… I translated an English poem wich I posted 2 days ago…”I know a place”…by Wayne Visser…in Afrikaans…you can read the poem at the bottom of this post in English. One Afrikaans-blogger has asked me for a translation as he’s thought that this poem would be fantastic  in Afrikaans  too….and I would like to agree with him, although Wayne’s poem is already a very good poem to describe your feelings/places about Africa and I believe only a person who knows Africa can describe it the way Wayne has done. I’ve sent him an email to respond on the translation I’ve done and he has responded…you can read his comments…he also responded in Afrikaans, saying that Afrikaans is a beautiful language for poetry…which I’ve said many times to my chess player friends…I do love English poetry too, but my favourite poems are without doubt the Afrikaans poems….not because it’s my mother tongue, but for the reason that Afrikaans is such a rich language and you can play with words a lot more than the English language.

As a native-speaking English person I know how much Afrikaans people are constantly ripped off by the English. Having a completely mixed up family I am also lucky to be completely bilingual. This all means that i have the best of both worlds, which I would like to share a bit of.

Afrikaans is an extremely expressive and descriptive language with words that can’t even possibly be translated into English…This is what meggwilson says on HER BLOG here…

  Visit Wayne’s website HERE to read his English poems…
 

 Nadat ek Wayne se gedig geplaas het, het Bib my gevra vir ‘n vertaling en gedink dat dit net so mooi gedig in Afrikaans kan wees. Wel, ek het probeer en ek glo ek sal nog oor die volgende paar dae “werk”/skaaf aan wat ek nou hier plaas. Ek het geen idee of Wayne Afrikaans magtig is nie en sal graag wou hê hy moet self ook ‘n vertaling doen, sou hy Afrikaanssprekend ook wees…ek het hom nou gekontak per email en hom gevra vir sy kommentaar …laat ons sien of hy gaan reageer…
nuusberig…nuusberig…nuusberig…Wayne het ‘n boodskap gelos oor die plasing van sy gedig, jy kan dit in die “kommentaar-blok” lees…


Ek weet van ‘n plek in Afrika
 Ek weet van ‘n plek in Afrika
Waar ek die son op my rug voel skyn
En die sand tussen my tone speel
Waar ek die seemeeu op die windjie hoor
En  golwe op  eindlose strande breek

 

Ek weet van ‘n plek in Afrika
Waar die berge die blou lug ontmoet
En valleie die groen wingerde huisves
Waar bome hul pers kleed sprei
En die bosveld sy room kleed dra
Ek weet van ‘n plek in Afrika
Waar die dondergode hul stemme laat hoor
En sien ek hul weerligspiese neerdaal
Waar ek die reuk van reenwolke intrek
En die soet van die stowwerige doudruppels proe
Dis ‘n wildernis, die plek
Van Evolusie en dinosorusse
Waar lewe begin het, hier was die eerste mens
Van lewende fossiele en olifante
Waar leeus brul en springboktroppe spring
Dis die plek van swaarkry
Van woestyne en doringbome
Waar paaie doodloop en jagters jag
Van horisonne en grense
Waar reise begin en sonsondergange bloei
Dis die plek van vryheid
Van ontdekkings en pioniers
Waar donkerte geskuil – en die lig deurgebreek het
Van ware legendes en wonderwerke
Waar dagbreek begin en hoop helder brand

My hart is tuis in Afrika
Waar die tromme se ritme in my klop
En  tydlose liedere in my ore sing
Waar die reenboogmis in my oë skyn
En vriende se glimlagte my welkom heet

My gedagtes ontspan in Afrika
Waar die mense na aan die aarde leef
En seisoene die veranderde gemoed aandui
Waar besige markte handel dryf
En die Skepping sy stadige gang steeds gaan

My siel is gelukkig in Afrika
Haar strome bring lewe in my are
Haar winde bring genesing vir my drome
Wanneer haar verhaal vertel is
Verenig dit ons in ons noodlot.

© Nikita…Mei 2008

Image:digitalekameraklub.co.za

image: digitalekameraklub.co.za

I know a place in Africa…
Inspiring poetry written by Wayne Visser,
a South African currently based in Nottingham, UK.

I know a place in Africa
Where I can feel the sun on my back
And the sand between my barefoot toes
Where I can hear the gulls on the breeze
And the waves crash on the endless shore

I know a place in Africa
Where the mountains touch the skies of blue
And the valleys shelter vines of green
Where the trees spread out a cloth of mauve
And the bushveld wears a coat of beige

I know a place in Africa
Where I can hear the voice of thunder gods
And watch their lightening spears thrown to earth
Where I can breathe the scent of rain clouds
And taste the sweet dew of dusty drops

This is the place of wildness
Of evolution and dinosaurs
Where life began and mankind first stood
Of living fossils and elephants
Where lions roar and springbok herds leap

This is the place of struggle
Of desert plains and thorn trees
Where pathways end and hunters track game
Of horizons and frontiers
Where journeys start and sunsets bleed red

This is the place of freedom
Of exploration and pioneers
Where darkness loomed and light saw us through
Of living legends and miracles
Where daybreak came and hope now shines bright

My heart is at home in Africa
Where the sound of drums beat in my chest
And the songs of time ring in my ears
Where the rainbow mist glows in my eyes
And the smiles of friends make me welcome

My mind is at ease in Africa
Where the people still live close to the soil
And the seasons mark my changing moods
Where the markets hustle with trading
And Creation keeps its own slow time

My soul is at peace in Africa
For her streams bring lifeblood to my veins
And her winds bring healing to my dreams
For when the tale of this land is told
Her destiny and mine are as one

© 2006 Wayne Visser

Hierdie ou het op sy blog die gedig geplaas sonder enige erkenning aan die vertaling wat ek gedoen het of die verwysing na Wayne Visser se gedig! Ten spyte van ‘n boodskap wat ek hom gelaat het, ignoreer hy dit steeds.
http://www.suid-afrikaners.co.za/magazine/read/ek-weet-van-n-plek-in-afrika_14.html

Image: digitalekameraklub.co.za

 

images:digitalekameraklub.co.za

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