Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Levon Aronian’

 

Sinquefield cup 2018

chess sinquefield cup 2018

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018

It’s time for the Sinquefield Cup and I’ve looked at some twitter news! I usually like to follow this tournament, but not sure if there will be time blogging about it. These are some favourite tweets.

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=4

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=5

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=1

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=3

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=6

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=2

Chess Sinquefieldcup 2018=7

chess magnus carlsen

Photos: Grand Chess Tour 2018 – What is Magnus thinking?

chess magnus carlsen 1

Shahriyar Mamedyarov resigns on behalf of his team.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

image-www.hbf.lv
LCC_

LCC_3

LCC_

LCC_presscon2012

Images: Official site of London Classic/Ray Morris-Hill

Players left  to r: Luke McShane, Hikaru Nakamura, Mickey Adams, Vladimir Kramnik, Viswanathan Anand, Malcolm Pein Tournament Director, Magnus Carlsen, Judit Polgar, Levon Aronian and Gawain Jones

LCC_1

LCC-121201-080

LCC_2

Jason Kouchak – during the Opening Ceremony of the London Classic 2012

Jason Kouchak is a widely-acclaimed concert pianist who plays popular music and jazz as well as classical music. Jason was born in France and studied piano at the Royal College of Music in London, and at Edinburgh University. He has performed in major concert halls in London, Paris, St Petersburg and other venues in Europe and Asia. He has recorded five albums, including his own compositions, and appeared on BBC TV and the Japanese NHK channel. He has made regular guest appearances with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and recorded and performed with Julian Lloyd-Webber. Jason’s tastes and talents underline the long-established link between chess and music. He is a committed and enthusiastic competition chess player, and played in the 2011 London Classic Open and 2009 Gibraltar tournaments as well as in other domestic chess competitions. Visit his site: Jasonkouchak.com 

http://www.londonchessclassic.com/special_events.htm

LCC_Anand

Anand Images: raymorris-hill.smugmug

It’s the London Chess Classic – again! It started today and I hope to attend it next Saturday, as my favourite – Anand is playing. The link of the official site is on the side bar – with the logo of the London Classic. Today’s games started with a small opening ceremony. There were a couple of musicians to entertain the group of spectators in the auditorium. Chess is free at the classics for children! On this  LINK you can read my entry about the classics in 2009. You can see my photos of the 2009 event. For the 2011 classics I had tickets, but unfortunately fell ill and couldn’t go. How sad.

This is a ‘cento‘ which I wrote a little while ago, by using Shakespeare lines.  A ‘cento’ is a poem written by using lines or passages of other authors in a new form or order. I used different plays of Shakespeare where he quoted something about the game of chess.

A Game of Chess
Sweet lord, you play me false
For a score of kingdoms you should wrangle
and I would call it fair play
How fares the king?
His hour is almost past

A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!
And I have horse – will follow where the game makes way.
I have his horse!
Give me another horse!
So, the good horse is mine.
My day’s delight is past, my horse is gone.
The rascal hath removed my horse.

Are the knights ready to begin their triumph?
A wandering knight?
I am undone! The knight is here!
Great shouts within all cry ‘the mean knight!’
Great is the humour of this dreadful knight.

I dare thereupon pawn
My life I never held but as a pawn
I have not pawn’d to you my majesty?
I pawn’d thee none!
I’ll send some bishop to entreat
The bishop will be overborne by thee
Wat says my bully rook?

There stands my castle!
His queen, it was his queen!
Queen of queens, how far dost thou excel?
Come hither, come! Come, come, and take a queen
Sir your queen must overboard!
Will take your queen
Farewell sweet queen!

I’ll move the king.
The skipping king, he ambles up and down
This may gall him for some check
No mates for you!
We’ll draw!
My lord, your son drew my master
Where’s the master? Play the men!
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown 

Enjoy a some classical music – Haydn’s symphony nr 101 in D – the clock part 3- one of many favourites and Villar Rides.  Unfortunately, not the whole track, but at least 3/4 of the track.

Another to enjoy

Villa Rides

chessphoto_

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

Images: Official  site on this link.

I’m glad about one thing: Aronian didn’t win. I was hoping that Kramnik would win, but a draw is good enough, for now.

I’ve been looking at the openings of the games played by Kramnik and Aronian, as I missed their games and could only follow game 6 on Saturday. It was interesting to see that both players did what I like to do – to capture my opponent’s Knight, as soon as I can. Well, maybe it was just them in these games, I can’t really say that’s how they always play. I love to keep my Knights for their unusual moves and that can come in very handy, especially with forks. Maybe in game 6 Kramnik decided with his Knight-move [move 7] that Aronian shouldn’t have his Knight – this time. When I played through their games, I found Game 3 quite a weird game! Some weird moves for Chess Grandmasters! [hehe] Maybe they were having fun. You can click on the images for a larger view. On this link HERE you can play through their games.

Kramink vs Aronian: Game 1

Aronian vs Kramnik: Game 2

Kramnik vs Aronian: Game 3

Aronian vs Kramnik: Game 4

Kramnik vs Aronian: Game 5

Aronian vs Kramnik Game 6

Rapid Game

This is the rapid game. Is it just ‘me’? Is this really a ‘great’ move? Aronian brought his Rook down to e1. He captures white’s Rook on a1. White moves his Bishop to d4. This is my question. Why did Aronian not see that move a few moves ahead. The King is pinned …with his Queen. – Is there a very good reason why he moved like he [Aronian] did. Why did he leave his King pinned?  Why did Aronian not capture the Pawn on g6? Do I miss something?

Read Full Post »


Please click the image to go to the official site. The link will open in a new window.

Just saying: I hope Kramnik beats Aronian up, because Aronian thinks women can’t play chess! [lol…I know Aronian has improved his chess over the past few years, but still…Kramnik, you go!]

Schedule
Date Saturday 21 April – Saturday 28 April 2012
Venue Hotel Savoy Baur en Ville, Festsaal
Rounds 6 (classical chess)

Rate of play – 40 moves in 120 minutes
– 20 moves in 60 minutes
– Rest of game in 15 minutes with an increment of 30 seconds per move
starting after move 61

If a game ends within 3 hours in a draw, an additional Rapid Game will be played (which does not count for the overall result)
Schedule

Fri. April 20: 19:00 Briefing
Sat. April 21: 15:00 Round 1
Sun. April 22: 15:00 Round 2
Mon. April 23: Rest Day
Tue. April 24: 15:00 Round 3
Wed. April 25: 15:00 Round 4
Thu. April 26: Rest Day
Fri. April 27: 15:00 Round 5

Meantime…some codes for you to figure out.

Read Full Post »

 


Please click HERE to play through the games of round 9. The games will open in a new separate window as all other links in this post too.

All images and info: from the Official site where you can also follow the games live!
On this link you can follow the the results of all the rounds.
On THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 1 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 2…and click here for round 3 all rounds’ games on chess.com’s site.

Topalov…winner of the Final Chess Masters

Final score…Click on the image for a larger view…source: Chessbase

Round 10…the final round

Pairings and results round 10 Saturday 13th September 2008–the final!

TOPALOV Veselin vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1-0  
CARLSEN Magnus vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2 
ARONIAN Levon vs RADJABOV Teimour–0-1

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 11

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 22

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 final position

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 11

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 21

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 32

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 42..move 43: Re6 end position

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 11

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 22

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 33

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 42

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 final position

Standings after round 9

round 9

Pairings and results: round 9 Friday 12th September 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2
RADJABOV Teimour vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
ANAND Viswanathan vs TOPALOV Veselin–1/2

Bilbao round 9 Anand vs Topalov move 10

Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 24

Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 34

Anand vs Topalov round 9 final position

Bilbao round 9 Radjabov vs Carlsen move 7

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 17

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 36

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 49

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 final position

Bilbao round 9 Ivanchuk vs Aronian move 11

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 24

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 42

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 51, please ignore the 1/2

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 final position

 

Standings after round 8 click on image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 8 Wednesday 10th September 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs RADJABOV Teimour–1-0  
ANAND Viswanathan vs ARONIAN Levon –1-0
TOPALOV Veselin vs CARLSEN Magnus–1-0


Round 8..Carlsen left…Topalov

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 11

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 16

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 21

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 26

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 34

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 42

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 end position



Round 8..Radjabov …Ivanchuk

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 6

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 13

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 20

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 44

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 end position

Round 8..Anand left…Aronian

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 13

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 20

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 27

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 39

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 49

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 58

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 66

Anand vs Aronian round 8 end position

Standings as 9 Sept – from the Official site…click on image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 7 Tuesday 9th September 2008

CARLSEN Magnus vs IVANCHUK Vassily –0-1
ARONIAN Levon vs TOPALOV Veselin–1-0  
RADJABOV Teimour vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2

Please click HERE to play through the games of round 7 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 6.

Standings…after 6 games…from the Official site..click for larger view

Pairings and results: round 6 Monday 8th September

IVANCHUK Vassily vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
TOPALOV Veselin vs RADJABOV Teimour –1/2
CARLSEN Magnus vs ARONIAN Levon–1-0


Round 6

Pairings and results: round 5: 6th Sept 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs TOPALOV Veselin –1/2
ANAND Viswanathan vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
RADJABOV Teimour vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2

Standings after round 4
Please click HERE to play through the games of round 4.

Results: round 4 – 5th Sept 2008

ARONIAN Levon IVANCHUK Vassily –1-0
CARLSEN Magnus RADJABOV Teimour–1-0
TOPALOV Veselin ANAND Viswanathan–1-0

Image: chess.com
The organisers are certainly making original efforts to make chess more accessible to spectators by placing the players in an “Aquarium” i.e. a giant, soundproofed glass box. This innovation was first seen earlier this year at the M-Tel Tournament, but in Bilbao the “Aquarium” will be situated outside in The Plaza Nueva in Bilbao.


Round 1

Round 3…Carlsen vs Topalov..image:chess.com

Round 5 …6th Sept

Bilbao will receive from September 2 to September 13, the strongest tournament of the History of the Chess. A tournament of the category XXII with Elo’s average of the participants of 2775,63. Further more, for the first time ever an event of such characteristics will take place in the street, in the Plaza Nueva, right in the centre of Bilbao’s Old Town.
The six players participating are currently among the world’s top ten chess players headed by world’s champion and number one Viswanathan Anand. Along with him, Magnus Carlsen (number two), Vasili Ivanchuk (number three), Véselin Topálov (number six), Teimur Radyábov (number seven) and Levon Aronián (world’s number ten currently) will compete in Bilbao. No tournament had managed so far to gather such a high Elo’s average level (scoring system to order players’ ranking).

For the first time in a world’s elite tournament and surrounded by a strong international controversy, the Final Masters is going to apply the football scoring system, earning three points per game won and one point per draw, though players will not be allowed to agree a draw being the competition’s referee who will determine it.

The Final Masters has the official recognition of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and it will be played in a double round league during ten days (plus a two-day break). The total prize money amounts to €400,000, sum only exceeded by World Chess Championships: €150,000 for the first classified, €70,000 for the second one, €60,000 for the third one, €50,000 for the fourth one, €40,000 for the fifth one and €30,000 for the sixth one.

Another great novelty in this tournament will be the playing place: the street, allowing a lot of people to follow the games live and directly. A huge soundproofed and air-conditioned glazed case is under construction to this purpose and it will be placed in the Plaza Nueva in Bilbao under a marquee which will also accommodate The Agora for analysis and comments, a space located by the glass case where the audience will also be able to enjoy comments from Chess Grandmasters among whom we can name Boris Spassky and Susan Polgar.

Pleae click HERE for the Official site.

Standings after round 3..click on the image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 3 — 4th Sept 2008
RADJABOV Teimour vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1/2
ARONIAN Levon vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
CARLSEN Magnus vs TOPALOV Veselin–0-1

Rounds 3-10…Pairings…source:chessbase

Anand
I couldn’t care less about my mental power or whatever it is said about me in the chess encyclopaedias in a hundred years time”. Viswanathan Anand is no doubt one of the greatest genius in chess history in the last fifteen centuries. But his easy-going character makes him the complete opposite of Fischer, Kárpov and Kaspárov. World champion and number one at the age of 38, he lives in Collado Mediano (Madrid), the rapid of Madras wants to polish even more his record in Bilbao at a month from the struggle for the crown with Russian Vladímir Krámnik.

“Although it is my second world title, this one is more valuable because in 2000 chess was suffering from a schism and there were two champions. Now I am the only one. The dream has come true” he explained in Mexico City on 1st October 2007, before calling his parents who live in Chennai (former Madras) and his “Spanish father”, Mauricio Perea.


Carlsen

The ‘Mozart of Chess’

His second places at the Wijk aan Zee Corus (Holland) 2008 and at the Ciudad de Linares 2008, where he repeated his 2007 achievement, are a sign that this 17 years old Norwegian is already mature for even greater achievements. Magnus Carlsen recommends parents of child prodigies: “to give them support but without putting pressure on them. My father taught me to play chess when I was 5, but I wasn’t interested at the time and he left me alone”. At the age of 2 he already solved difficult jigsaws; at 5 he remembered the capitals, flags, areas and inhabitants of every country.

At 8, Magnus felt jealous one of his sisters played chess and that is where a career only comparable in precociousness with the ones of the sacred manes began. At 13 Carlsen became the youngest chess grandmaster in the world; and today, at the age of 17, he is among the world’s top five players in the rankings. He sleeps up to eleven hours, is a passionate fan of the Real Madrid and Spain is the country he knows best. When he is not travelling he attends a special school for sports talents. He has his particular opinion about money: “I don’t really know what to do with it”. I spend much less than I earn”.


Ivanchuk
An adorable absent-minded wise man

His sensational victory in the Mtel Masters, Sofia 2008 gave him the right to be in the Bilbao Final Masters. But even without this feat, Vassili Ivanchuk deserves a place among the top-class chess players: at almost 40, he is the oldest luminary though he is nevertheless at the peak of his career. Chess lover to the core, tireless worker of encyclopaedic knowledge he is a genius absent-minded wise man of whom everybody – even his most bitter rivals- speaks very fondly.

“My secret is I don’t know how I managed to win those five first games one after the other. I certainly did have a little bit of what it is called the luck of the champions. But the key is I wasn’t aware of what I was achieving; otherwise I would have never managed to do it. I believe I am at the best of my career. I don’t feel a bit old to stay in the elite; particularly if I compare myself to Víktor Korchnói, who is at his 77 years old still in the front line!”. So modestly explained Ivanchuk his win in Sofia –undefeated, with eight of ten possible points-, one of the best results in chess history.


Topalov
An exemplary fighter on his way up

He defeated Kasparov in what was to be his last game (Linares 2005) and he is a clear symbol of the differences between the current chess elite and the times of the Ogre of Baku.Natural, modest and very friendly, a fighter and well disciplined about his everyday training, and tries to keep a good image. That’s Veselin Topalov, the 33 year-old Bulgarian from Salamanca world chess champion in 2005 and currently number four in the chess rankings, with the clear aim to take up again the crown in 2009.

“I will never forget what happened to me when I was 8 years old in Ruse, my native city. After defeating me, one of the best players of the area gave me a row, he pulled my ears and almost hit me because I had played too fast, without thinking. A year later I played with him again in the same tournament, and I won, he remembers about his childhood in Bulgaria.

Topalov admits that it is impossible to be among the world’s top ten chess players without innate talents: “If we put it into round numbers, 60% of my success is due to the effort and 40% to the talent”.

Radjabov
The kid that knocked out Kasparov

Even though chess is along with music and mathematics the activity that more child prodigies produces, very few have impressed so much as Teimur Radyabov. At 12, when he became European Champion U-18, he already showed a strategic depth and good manners not expected from someone of his age. At 14 he became grandmaster. At 15 he defeated Kasparov with the black pieces in Linares. Today he is 21 and has settled among the elite, though everything shows that he’s still got a long way to go, as he will most probably demonstrate in Bilbao.

One has to go back as far as the legendary Bobby Fischer in the 60’s to find feats as resounding as when Radyabov defeated Kasparov in 2003. Also born in Baku, he had never lost with white pieces to a human rival in the classical game since May 1996. Bearing in mind that both of them were born in Baku and were Guéidar Alíyev’s protégées (President of the Azerbaijan KGB when Kasparov was young and of the Azerbaijani Government when Radyábov was a child) one can better understand Kaspárov’s angry outburst that night: he did not shake hands with the winner and had a very late dinner, thumping his fist on the table while having chicken.

Aronian

An easy-going winner

He could be the boy from the shop around the corner, jet he is a great chess luminary: he is only 25 years old but has already won the World Cup and the Linares and Wijk aan Zee (twice) tournaments. That naturalness, his universal style and belonging to a country where chess is the national passion, as well as a balanced nervous system configure the 25 year-old Armenian Levon Aronian as a very solid value.

“I’m not prepared to compete with the big ones. The only advantage I have over those beasts is my total ignorance and fresh thinking”, Aronian said at Christmas 2005, a few days after having won the World Cup in Siberia and some days just before his debut in the Wijk aan Zee Corus Tournament (Holland), where he shared the 7th place of 14 participantespants. Just a month later he triumphed in Linares, the chess Wimbledon, so surprisingly as convincingly.

Images from different rounds from the Official site.

About.com…classic chess…64 great chess games ever played…follow this link

http://chess.about.com/library/pal4/zbstches/blzbstix.htm

LIVE ratings!

http://chess.liverating.org/



Round 6

Image: zeenews.com
Fifth draw for Anand in Chess Grand Slam
Bilbao, Sept 09: India’s Viswanathan Anand continued to search for his first win of the Chess Grand Slam Final being staged here, as he played yet another draw in the sixth round.

The world champion, who is back by Tech giant NIIT, Monday drew with Vassily Ivanchuk in 32 moves and took his total to 2.5 points on the traditional points system.

But here in Bilbao with draws fetching one point and wins three, Anand has five, while the leader is young Magnus Carlsen with 11 points from three wins and two draws and one loss.

The Ivanchuk-Anand game was a staid draw coming out from a Slav Defence, with Ivanchuk making a token effort to gain advantage and Anand thwarting this effectively for a 32-move draw.

Anand’s game has been somewhat subdued leading to the feeling that the world champion is not revealing any of his major preparations that he may have made for the world title match against Vladimir Kramnik next month.

Veselin Topalov, who beat Anand in the fifth round, and has 10 points with two wins and four draws, follows Carlsen. Lev Aronian, the only player with two losses, is third with six points, and Anand, Teimour Radjabov and Ivanchuk have five points each.

The tournament is a six-player double round robin event, one of the strongest in the history of the game.

The scoring system in this tournament is different and experimental. Players get three points for a win, one point for a draw and zero points for losing a game. For rating purposes the traditional 1-½-0 system will be used.

The prize fund for the event is 400,000 Euros, with the winner receiving 150,000 Euros, the second place 70,000 Euros, and so on, with the sixth player getting 30,000 Euros. The sums are unprecedented for an event like this. Only world championships have exceeded the amount.

The Topalov-Radjabov clash was more volatile, with the Bulgarian GM looking set to chalk up another victory in Bilbao. But after massive trade-offs after the time control Black had solved all his problems and in fact undertook some tentative attempts to play for a win. The draw came with a repetition at move 73.

Carlsen continued his great run with a solid win over Aronian. He sacrificed a pawn, which was part of theory, but then young Carlsen played a novelty which involves a second sacrifice on move 15. It loosely resembled the Gelfand-Kramnik game in Mexico City 2007, but that ended in a draw.

The novelty led to Carlsen forcing Aronian’s king to be stuck in the middle. Carlsen got one pawn back and then launched a blistering attack. He wrapped up the game in 32 moves.

In the seventh round, Anand will have black pieces against Radjabov, while Carlsen clashes with Ivanchuk and Aronian meets Topalov.

Scores after six rounds: Carlsen (11 points); 2. Topalov (10 points); Aronian (6 points); Anand, Radjabov and Ivanchuk (5 points each).

IANS
Source: http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=467774&sid=SPO&ssid=93


AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

Congratulations Levon Aronian, Winner of the Asrian Memorial, 2008.

1st place: Levon Aronian 8.5 points
2nd place: Peter Leko 8 points
3rd place: Alexander Morozevich 7.5 points
4th place: Boris Gelfand 7.5 points

Live games link HERE
For the results on the tournament, follow the link to the official site or on the second link where you can play through their games too.

Chess Giants Yerevan 2008″ rapid chess tournament which will be held in Yerevan, Armenia from June 8-15, 2008. Eight giants of the chess world will pair off and play two games a day in what promises to be a week of fighting chess. You can follow the games every day at 18:00 PM local time (GMT+4) from Yerevan’s picturesque Opera House. Please click HERE for the Official site of Chess Giants.
On THIS LINK you can play through their games as the tournament goes…enjoy!

Standings after 10 rounds

1. Leko, Peter HUN 2741 6½
2. Aronian, Levon ARM 2763 6
3. Sargissian, Gabriel ARM 2643 5½
4-5. Bu Xiangzhi CHN 2708 5
4-5. Gelfand, Boris ISR 2723 5
6. Morozevich, Alexander RUS 2774 4½
7. Adams, Michael ENG 2729 4
8. Akopian, Vladimir ARM 2673 3½

Aronian and Morozevich

 

Morozevich and Adams

Alexander Morozevich – RUS 2774

Levon Aronian – ARM 2763

Peter Leko – HUN 2741

 

Michael Adams – ENG 2729

 

Boris Gelfand – ISR 2723

 

Gabriel Sargissian – ARM 2643

Vladimir Akopian – ARM 2673

Bu Xiangzhi – CHN 2708

 Round 1
1 Sargissian 1/2 Adams
2 Morozevich 1-0 Gelfand
3 Bu 1/2 Leko
4 Aronian 1/2 Akopian

Round 2
1 Adams 1/2 Sargissian
2 Gelfand 1/2 Morozevich
3 Leko 1-0 Bu
4 Akopian 1/2 Aronian

Note that due to the tragic news of GM Karen Asrian’s passing, the games scheduled for June 10 and June 11 have been postponed. The Chess Giants tournament will resume on June 12. Click HERE  to read about his death.

According to the decision of the Armenian Chess Federation, the Chess Giants Yerevan 2008 tournament has been renamed the Karen Asrian Memorial and will be held traditionally in honor of our cherished champion.

In addition, the rapid open scheduled to have been played in parallel to the main tournament from June 12-15, has been cancelled.

 It is with great sadness and difficulty we report to you that today, June 9, Armenian Grandmaster Karen Asrian passed away. He was 28 years old. Details will be forthcoming. Round 1 games started late after a moment of silence in GM Asrian’s memory.

Yerevan, Armenia, the Opera House is the round building on the left…and this is where this tournament takes place. Image: Britanica

 

Image: http://www.ecml.at/html/armenian/images/yerevan

In the valley of Biblical Mount Ararat lies the beautiful ancient city of Yerevan, the 12th capital of Armenia. Yerevan was built around the city-fortress of Erebuni established by the King Argishti the First the king of Urartu in the year 782 BC.The ruins of Erebuni still stand in the southeastern part of the city.

A large part of the Erebuni fortification had been reconstructed by 1968 when the city celebrated the 2750th anniversary of its foundation. The well-preserved walls permitted the complete reproduction of the layout of Erebuni.

Yerevan is situated in the north-eastern part of the Ararat Valley. Mounts Aragats, Azhdaak, and Ararat can be seen from the city. With its rugged terrain, Yerevan displays a 400m disparity between its lowest and highest points. The city is divided by Hrazdan River that flows in a picturesque canyon.

The climate in Yerevan is dry and sharply varied with temperatures in summer peaking over 35 C and falling below -15 C in winter.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

 

Ivanchuk…the winner!

Ivanchuk’s last game…played in round 10…against Cheparinov…as by Kingscrusher of Chess World.

Image:chessdom



Image: discover-bulgaria.com…the building where the tournament is being held.

Ivanchuk the winner of Mtel…Final results…

Ivanchuk…image:chessdom

Ivanchuk Vassily 2740 UKR 8
Topalov Veselin 2767 BUL 6,5
Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5,5
Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 4
Bu Xiangzhi 2708 CHN 3
Aronian Levon 2763 ARM 3
 


Please click HERE to play through the games of round 10 — the final round.

Results  round 10…the final round…
Topalov, V vs Radjabov, T….1/2
Cheparinov, I vs Ivanchuk, V….0-1
Aronian, L vs Xiangzhi, Bu….1/2

Please click this link: to access the MTel 2008 games on site of Chessgames.


Round 10 (final)…Aronian vs Xiangzhi…end position

Round 10 — Cheparinov vs Ivanchuk…end position… 0-1


Round 10 — Topalov vs Radjabov…end position…1/2

Cheparinov…image:Chessdom

Aronian and Xiangzhi

 

Topalov

Standings after round 9:

Ivanchuk Vassily 2740 UKR 7
Topalov Veselin 2767 BUL 6
Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5
Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 4
Bu Xiangzhi 2708 CHN 2,5
Aronian Levon 2763 ARM 2,5

Please click HERE to play through the games of round 9.
Round 9: Results… in blue…with the images… Xiangzhi beats Topalov!!


Round 9 Radjabov vs Cheparinov…after move 11

Round 9: End position – Radjabov vs Cheparinov… 1/2


Round 9: Xiangzhi vs Topalov…after move…13

Round 9: Xiangzhi vs Topalov…move 33

Round 9: End position….Xiangzhi vs Topalov….1-0!


Round 9: Ivanchuk vs Aronian ….. move…11


Round 9: Ivanchuk vs Aronian …end position….1/2
Results round 8

Topalov, V vs Cheparinov, I = 1-0
Aronian, L vs Radjabov, T = 0-1
Xiangzhi, Bu vs Ivanchuk, V = 1/2

Images:Europe-echecs


The amazing Veselin Topalov (artist’s impression pictured!) convincingly won his 8th round game against his countryman and friend, Ivan Cheparinov to close the gap to former runaway leader Vassily Ivanchuk to just half a point. 

Ivanchuk was definitely second best in his game but hung on to draw against Bu Xiangzhi.  Since his 5/5 start, Ivanchuk has now drawn his last three games.

Please click HERE to play through the games played in round 8.

Pairings round 9:

Xiangzhi, Bu vs Topalov, V
Ivanchuk, V vs Aronian, L
Radjabov, T vs Cheparinov, I


Round 7: Xiangzhi vs Radjabov…end position


Round 7: Topalov vs Ivanchuck…end position


Round 7: Aronian vs Cheparinov … end position

***This post will be updated as the tournament goes… so everyday’s results – till round 10 – will be added in this post. Click on images for a larger view.
Please click on THIS LINK to see the results of rounds 1-5…also, to read about Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria where this Master’s tournament is taking place!
On this link
HERE you can play through games played in earlier rounds and see the results of round 6 and see two video annotations about Ivanchuk’s games in rounds 4 and 5.
On
THIS LINK you can follow the video reports after each round….and HERE you will find the games from all the rounds being played. On my blog’s side bar  you will find a LIVE “MTel”- link to the current games of the day they’re busy playing.

Results round 7:

Ivanchuk vs Topalov 1/2
Radjabov vs Xiangzhi 1-0
Cheparinov vs Aronian 1/2

Standings after round 7:

1. Ivanchuk Vassily 2740 UKR 6
2. Topalov Veselin 2767 BUL 5
3. Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 3,5
3. Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 3,5
4. Aronian Levon 2763 ARM 2
5. Bu Xiangzhi 2708 CHN 1


Schedule ….for the rest of the tournament…

Round 8: May 16, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)
Round 9: May 17, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)
Round 10: May 18, 14.00 EEST (11.00 UTC)

Tie breaks: 19.00 EEST (16.00 UTC)
Closing ceremony: 20.00 EEST (17.00 UTC)
Cocktail party: 21.00 EEST (18.00 UTC)

 

Images:MTelmasters.com… the official site

 

 Sofia, 15 May 2008- Author’s copy of the ancient Bulgarian icon “St. Trinity” will be the special prize of the winner in the super chess tournament M-Tel Masters 2008. The author of the icon is the famous Bulgarian painter Katya Bajlekova the size if the icon is 62 x 46 cm and the image is aged by a special technology.

The special prize will be handed to the winner in M-Tel Masters 2008 at the official closing ceremony of the tournament on May 18.

Traditionally, for a fourth year in a row the winner of the Sofia super chess tournament receives as a special prize a copy of an ancient Bulgarian icon. As a three-time winner of M-Tel Masters Veselin Topalov already has in his collection a copy of the icons “Entering Jerusalem”, “St. George the Winner” and “Four Saints – Warriors” by the same painter.
Source: Mtelmasters.com

This video is about the final round…round 10

This video is about round 6….Ivanchuck against Radjabov

This next video is about Topalov playing round 8 against Cheparinov by Chess World.

 
MTel-video about round 8

MTel-video round 9!

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »