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Ever heard of a chess pie? No, neither me…but here it is!…and there’s a love cake with a chess sponge to order…!

On a cold, dreary day, Tangerine Chess Pie offers sweet sunshine by the slice. All of your favorite citrus fruits are in great supply right now. Mounds of ruby red grapefruit, juicy oranges, sweet tangerines, and tart lemons and limes dominate the produce section. Give them a squeeze, and turn the refreshing essence into this terrific dessert. When you need a shortcut, you can use cartons of fresh-squeezed juice. Some markets even carry fresh-squeezed tangerine juice. If tangerines aren’t your favorite citrus fruit, then try a lemon-lime, orange, or grapefruit pie.

Prep: 12 minutes
Bake: 53 minutes
Yield: 1 (9-inch) pie

1 (15-ounce) package refrigerated piecrusts

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon yellow cornmeal

1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted

1/4 cup milk

2 teaspoons grated tangerine rind

1/3 cup fresh tangerine juice

1 tablespoon lemon juice

4 large eggs, lightly beaten

Garnishes: sweetened whipped cream, tangerine slices

Unfold piecrusts; stack piecrusts on a lightly floured surface. Roll into 1 (12-inch) circle.

Fit piecrust into a 9-inch pie plate according to package directions; fold edges under, and crimp.

Bake piecrust at 450 degrees for 8 minutes; cool on a wire rack.

Whisk together sugar and next 9 ingredients until blended. Pour into piecrust.

Bake at 350 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes or until center is set, shielding edges of crust with aluminum foil after 20 minutes to prevent excessive browning. Cool on a wire rack. Garnish with whipped cream and tangerine slices, if desired.

Grapefruit Chess Pie:
Substitute fresh grapefruit juice and rind for tangerine juice and rind. Garnish with sweetened whipped cream and grapefruit rind or lime rind and lime slices, if desired.

Lemon-Lime Chess Pie:
Substitute fresh lime juice for tangerine juice and 1 teaspoon grated lime rind and 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind for tangerine rind. Garnish pie with sweetened whipped cream, lime and lemon wedges, and grated lime and lemon rind, if desired.

Orange Chess Pie:
Substitute fresh orange juice and rind for tangerine juice and rind. Garnish with sweetened whipped cream, orange slices, and orange rind, if desired.

Source of RECIPE here.


To order this love cake with a chess sponge…click HERE …..

Yummy!
Picture: celebratecakes.com/mysite/grooms_cakes.htm

I copied the following recipe/post as it is from The Kenilworthchessclub … enjoy!

The Kenilworthian’s Apple Chess Tarts

Ingredients:
  • 12 ready made mini pie shells (I used two packages of Keebler® Ready Crust® Mini Graham Cracker Pie Crust)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 stick butter, softened
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups peeled and grated Granny Smith apples (about 3-4 regular sized apples)
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

Directions:

  • Cream butter and sugar using a hand-mixer.
  • Add eggs and flour and mix until well-blended, but do not over-mix.
  • Grate apples using a standard cheese grater, trying to avoid getting too much apple juice into the mix. You want nice shreds of apple, loosely measured at about 2 cups. I recommend Granny Smith apples, but any relatively firm and tart apple will do.
  • Mix in lemon juice (for added tartness) and cinnamon. Both are optional. Some people prefer the taste of the apple to come through. I like most of all to accentuate the tartness of the apples. The cinnamon just makes it seem more like good old apple pie.
  • Fold grated apple mixture into the batter. Don’t worry if it gets a little runny with the lemon and apple liquid.
  • Divide mixture equally among 12 mini pie shells.
  • Bake on a cookie sheet (or foil) for 8 min. at 400 degrees, then 35-40 minutes at 325 degrees or until lightly browned on top.

I made these for our Annual Holiday Party on Thursday and they were a big hit. I adapted the recipe from one for chess pie that I have seen posted several places on the internet. There actually is no connection between “chess pie” and the game of chess, by the way: likely the name derives from a corruption of the word “cheese,” either because cheese was often added to the recipe (it was popular among Southern farmers) or because the solids tend to “cheese up” at the surface of the pie, no one really knows. Even if the name has no real connection to the game, though, it is fun to make for a chess-related function.

I’ve been playing around with apple “chess” recipes of late (see here and here, here and here). I decided to go with apple chess tarts over chess pie because the pie gets rather gooey and is not easy to slice up without making a mess. I definitely do not recommend the pie version if you are going to share it at a social function. But the tarts or mini-pies are really perfect for parties. The only tricky part is figuring out how best to eat them…. Likely I should have removed them from the foil before serving, since people ended up either using a spoon on them (not the best solution) or plopping them out onto a plate (hardly very elegant).

Here’s a recipe for “chess cake” that I’ve been meaning to try.

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