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chess_Candidates_2016-

chess_candidates_2016

Who is going to be the winner? 

The World Chess Candidates that takes place  on March 10 – 30, 2016, is a dramatic tournament which determines the challenger for the World Chess Championship. The winner will play a match for the title against reigning World Champion Magnus Carlsen in November in the US.

Candidates Chess 2016 participants
1. Vishwanathan Anand (India) – The player who lost the 2014 World Championship Match
2. Sergey Karjakin (Russia) – as winner of the FIDE World Cup in Baku
3. Peter Svidler (Russia) – as the silver medalist of the FIDE World Cup in Baku
4. Fabiano Caruana (USA/Italy) – from FIDE Grand Prix 2014–15
5. Hikaru Nakamura (USA) – from FIDE Grand Prix 2014–15
6. Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) – By rating
7. Anish Giri (Netherlands) – By rating
8. Levon Aronian (Armenia) – organizers nominee of rating higher than 2725 ELO
Candidates 2016 details
Details of the Tournament:
Dates: March 8 – 29, 2016
Number of players: 8
Format: Double round robin tournament (14 rounds)
Length: 22 days including arrivals, departures, opening and closing ceremonies
Prize fund: EUR 561,000 

Please click here for live cover on chessdom.

ROUND 1 Anand 1 – 0 Topalov Please click HERE to play through the game of GM Anand and GM Topalov.

ROUND 2 – Please click HERE to play through the game of GM Aronian vs GM Anand.
Aronian: 1/2 – 1/2 Anand
Chess_Candidates_2016_Anand

ROUND 6

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Be7 6 Re1 b5 7 Bb3 O-O 8 a4 Bb7 9 d3 Re8 10 Nbd2 Bf8 11 c3 Na5 12 Bc2 c5 13 d4 exd4 14 cxd4 d5 15 e5 Ne4 16 axb5 axb5 17 Nxe4 dxe4 18 Rxe4 Nb3 19 Rxa8 Bxa8 20 Ng5 Nxc1 21 Qh5 h6 22 Qxf7+ Kh8 23 Rg4 Qa5 24 h4
GM Anand 1-0 GM Svidler

ROUND 7
GM Giri 1/2 GM Anand
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 Nc3 Nbd7 5 Qc2 Bb4 6 a3 Bxc3+ 7 Qxc3 O-O 8 Bg5 h6 9 Bh4 c5 10 e3 cxd4 11 Qxd4 Re8 12 Bxf6 Nxf6 13 cxd5 Nxd5 14 Be2 Nf6 15 Qxd8 Rxd8 16 O-O Bd7 17 Rfc1 Rac8 18 Kf1 Kf8 19 Ke1 Ke7 20 Ne5 Rxc1+ 21 Rxc1 Rc8 22 Rxc8 Bxc8 23 f4 Nd7 24 Nxd7 Bxd7 25 Kd2 Kd6 26 Kc3 e5 27 g3 b6 28 Bc4 f6 29 b4 g5 30 h4 gxh4 31 gxh4

Round 9

GM Anand, Viswanathan 1-0  GM Aronian, Levon 

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Bc5 4 O-O d6 5 d3 Nf6 6 c3 a6 7 a4 Ba7 8 Na3 Ne7 9 Nc2 Ng6 10 Be3 O-O 11 Bxa7 Rxa7 12 Ne3 Ng4 13 Qd2 a5 14 d4 Ra8 15 dxe5 N4xe5 16 Nxe5 Nxe5 17 Bb3 Nd7 18 Bc2 Re8 19 f3 b6 20 Rfd1 Nc5 21 b4 Nd7 22 Bb3 Nf6 23 Qd4 Qe7 24 Nd5 Nxd5 25 Bxd5 Ra7 26 b5 Bb7 27 c4 Qe5 28 Rac1 Qxd4+ 29 Rxd4 Kf8 30 Kf2 Ke7 31 f4 f6 32 Rc3 Kd7 33 Rh3 h6 34 Rg3 Re7 35 Rg6 Bxd5 36 cxd5 Ra8 37 Kf3 Rae8 38 Kg4 Rxe4 39 Rxg7+ Kc8 40 Rd2 Kb8 41 Rc2 Rc8 42 Ra2 Rd4 43 Kf5 Rxd5+ 44 Kxf6 Rf8+ 45 Rf7 Rxf7+ 46 Kxf7 Rf5+ 47 Kg6 Rxf4 48 g3 Rc4 49 Kxh6 d5 50 Kh5 d4 51 g4 d3 52 h4 Rd4 53 Rd2 Kc8 54 g5 Kd7 55 Kg6 Rxh4 56 Rxd3+ Ke8 57 Ra3 Rc4 58 Kg7 Kd7 59 g6 c6 60 Kf6 cxb5 61 g7 Rg4 62 axb5 Rg1 63 Rd3+ Ke8 64 Re3+ Kd7 65 Re5 Rxg7 66 Rd5+ 1-0

Round 11 – GM Anand vs GM Sergey 1-0
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 Nf6 4 d3 Bc5 5 c3 O-O 6 O-O d6 7 h3 Ne7 8 d4 Bb6 9 Bd3 d5 10 Nxe5 Nxe4 11 Nd2 Nd6 12 Nb3 c6 13 Nc5 Ng6 14 Qh5 Bxc5 15 dxc5 Ne4 16 Bxe4 dxe4 17 Rd1 Qe7 18 Nxg6 hxg6 19 Qg5 Qxg5 20 Bxg5 f6 21 Be3 g5 22 Rd6 Re8 23 Rad1 Be6 24 b3 Kf7 25 R1d4 Bf5 26 a4 Re7 27 g4 Bh7 28 b4 Bg8 29 b5 Rc8 30 Rd7 Rce8 31 b6 a6 32 Rc7 Kf8 33 c4 Be6 34 Rxe4 Kf7 35 f4 Rxc7 36 bxc7 Rc8 37 f5 Bd7 38 h4 g6 39 Rd4 Rxc7 40 hxg5 fxg5 41 Bxg5 Be8 42 f6 Kf8 43 Bf4 Rh7 44 Kg2 Bd7 45 Bg5 Be6 46 Rd8+ Kf7 47 Rb8 Bxc4 48 Rxb7+ Kg8 49 Rb8+ Kf7 50 Kg3 Ke6 51 Re8+ Kf7 52 Rc8 Bd5 53 Kf4 Ke6 54 Re8+ Kd7 55 Ra8 Ke6 56 Re8+ Kd7 57 Re3 a5 58 Kg3 Rf7 59 Kf4 Rh7 60 Re1 Kc8 61 Kg3 Rf7 62 Re8+ Kd7 63 Ra8 Kc7 64 Kf4 Rd7 65 Bh4 Kb7 66 Re8 Bf7 67 Re4 Bd5 68 Re3 Bf7 69 Kg5 Ka6 70 Re7 1-0

Results: chessbase

Congratulations to GM Sergey Karjakin!

Sergey-Karjakin

Sergey Karjakin is going to the FIDE World Chess Championship Final 2016 in New York after winning the Candidates Chess 2016 tournament with 8,5/14. In the decisive round 14 Karjakin won the final game against Fabiano Caruana and surged a full point ahead in the standings. The Russian player is going to face the defending champion Magnus Carlsen.

Sergey-Karjakin1

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Henry_Kamsky

Henry’s game vs Kamsky. Tromso round 4

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 d6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. a3 O-O 7. Ba2 Nc6 8. d3 Rb8 9. Re1 b5 10. Ne2 a5 11. Ng3 b4 12. c3 Ba6 13. d4 bxc3 14. bxc3 Nd7 15. Bf4 e5 16. Be3 cxd4 17. cxd4 exd4 18. Nxd4 Nxd4 19. Bxd4 Ne5 20. Rb1 g6 21. Rxb8 Qxb8 22. f4 Nd3 23. Nf5 Re8 24. Nh6+ Kf8 25. Qa1 Rc8 26. Bxf7 Bh4 27. Rf1 Rc2 28. f5 Ne5 29. fxg6 Bxf1 30. Qxf1 hxg6 31. Bxg6+ Bf2+ 32. Bxf2 Kg7 33. Bh5 Kxh6 34. Be3+ Kg7 35. h4 Qc8 36. Qd1 Qc6 37. Qe1 Kh7 38. Bg5 Qc5+ 39. Kh2 Qf2 40. Qxf2 Rxf2 41. Be7 Rd2 42. Be8 Rd3 43. g3 Ng6 44. Bd8 Rxa3 45. h5 Ne5 46. Bc7 Re3 47. Bxa5 Rxe4 48. Kh3 Re2 49. Bc7 Rd2 50. g4 Kh6 51. Bb5 Kg5 52. Kg3 Nxg4 53. Bd8+ Nf6 54. h6 Kg6 55. Kf3 Rh2 56. Bc7 Rh3+ 57. Kg2 Rb3 58. Be2 Ne4 59. Bf3 Rb2+ 60. Kg1 Ng5 61. Bg2 Rd2 62. Bb6 Kxh6 63. Be3 Ra2 64. Bf4 Ra6 65. Bf1 Rb6 66. Kf2 Kg6 67. Bd3+ Kf6 68. Ke3 Nf7 69. Bc4 Ne5 70. Bg8 Ra6 71. Ke4 Ra4+ 72. Ke3 Ra8 73. Bh7 Ke6 74. Bc2 Ra3+ 75. Ke2 d5 76. Bh7 d4 77. Be4 Ra2+ 78. Kf1 Nc4 79. Ke1 Ne3 80. Bg3 Rb2 81. Bc7 Nd5 82. Bg3 Nf6 83. Bd3 Kd5 84. Bf4 Nd7 85. Bh7 Ne5 86. Bg3 Nf3+ 87. Kd1 d3 88. Bf4 0-1

kamsky

Round 4: Kamsky Photo-  @Tromso2014 

I was super excited when Gert – also a chess enthusiast, who mainly blogs about great South African Afrikaans writers and poets and writes about movies, musicians, componists, etc.  in general- informed me about the win of Henry Steel vs Gata Kamsky. I have been following this particular group of South African champs for the past few years in the ‘big‘ tournaments like these and they are a strong team of chess players and South Africa can be proud of them. Congratulations to Henry, we hope that your game against Kamsky will inspire the team to do even better. The following images are from Tromso, tweeted out to the twitter community by Susan Polgar.

Tromso_

Tromso_1

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chessMaGNus

@TarjeiJS Tweeted this: ‘Article of the dn.no announcing his new sponsorship deal with Nordic Semiconductor’ 

tromsoview
The view from Tromso, as tweeted by Svensen: ‘The view from my room is acceptable!’ – he is also tweeting about the Tromso Chess World Cup tournament
chessmagnus-

‘Millions flowing in for chess ace’

Magnus and the article as translated by ‘google-translate’ The article can be read in the Norwegian language from the link at the bottom of the entry. To all those little 10 year old boys always saying, ‘ I want to be a footballer’ – what about: ‘I want to be a Magnus Carlsen’ [hehe]

Norwegian sponsors will use the world’s best chess player opener with large customers, writing Todays Market.

On Saturday puts Magnus Carlsen heading to Chennai in India to prepare for the World Cup tournament pending against Viswanathan Anand in November.

On Monday techno now Nordic Semiconductor Carlsen fifth main, next to the law firm Simonsen, brokerage Arctic, newspaper VG house and software company Parallels.

Will he win the World Cup waiting nine million kroner in prize money. In addition, there are about six million in sponsorship revenue and miscellaneous other income.

Thankful
After the DN understand the young chess player will stand to gain a gross turnover of between 15 and 20 million years.

The money goes through the company Magnus Chess, which since 2007 has had a total turnover of 27 million. The profit before tax amounts to 15 million dollars, and Carlsen had at the end of 2012, built up a solid equity of nearly 12 million.

‘ I am very grateful that I can live on something I think is so fun. Beyond that I’m not thinking so much about it’, says Magnus Carlsen about their financial chess moves.

Please click here to read the original article.

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chess_world_cup_2013
It is time for the Chess World Cup 2013 – in Norway
Please click here for the official site.
chessworldcup

Photo and message from Europe-Echecs Twitter account See the official video to know who is taking part. My favourite this time? I think Etienne Bacrot.

chess-tromso1
Chess Players arriving at the university of Tromso for the opening ceremony – photo SPolgar [twitter]

chess-tromso
Susan Polgar doing exactly what she says on these tweets

chess-tromso2

chessjudit
Susan interviews her ‘baby’ sister, Judit on 13/8/2013

chess-tromso2-
NO Susan, he is NOT funny and insightful, read HERE why I don’t think he is and make sure you read the first 10 lines carefully. [hmf]
tromso_barentsobserver

Tromso – image: Barents Observer

Tromso
Lovely colourful houses in Tromso [image:getintotravel]

Tromso
Tromso Chess – 17/8/2013 Game 3 round 1

tromso-p

Tromso round 3 tight security

chessworldcupfinal
Final game 1 – Kramnik wins

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anand_magnus_chennai_

New Delhi: Viswanathan Anand will defend his World Chess Championship title against world number one Magnus Carlsen in his home city as FIDE today chose Chennai as the venue for the prestigious match.

Even as it has been reported that Carlsen was not keen to play in Chennai and instead preferred Paris as the venue, the FIDE Presidential Board confirmed Chennai as the venue during a meeting at Baku, Azerbaijan today.

The match between the Indian and his Norwegian opponent will be played from November 6 to 26.

“The agreement was signed today at Baku by Bharat Singh, Hony Secretary All India Chess Federation and FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov,” a press released stated.

Anand had defeated Boris Gelfand of Israel to retain his title in 2012. Source: Zeenews.india

Farewell Farewell

A variation on the Cento – used Shakespeare-lines about Chess

There stands the castle!
My day’s delight is past
great shouts within
and all cry

A horse! A horse!
I have a horse and
a wandering knight.
My skipping king
ambles up and down

A wandering knight?
The knight is here
… a mean knight

The hour is almost past
Farewell Farewell


It’s hilarious – Carlsen’s coach?

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Reykjavik_Open_2013

Reykjavik Open 2013

Reykjavik_Open

Reykjavik_Open_schedule

Schedule

AnishGiri

Anish Giri

IvanCheparinov

Click HERE to play through the chess games of Cheparinov on chessgames.com

Some of the players: David Navara, Anish Giri,  Johan-Sebastian  Christiansen, Svetoslav Mihajlov, Ivan Cheparinov,  Claude Hoegener, Sebastian  Mihajlov, Gawain Jones and Per Isaksson

reykjavikchess

The tournament are held in Harpa, Reykjavik´s spectacular new music hall on the harbour : 19th – 27th February 2013

The City of Reykjavík has sponsored the tournament since its inception in 1964, when Mikhail Tal won it with a record 12½ points out of 13. The tournament was initially held every two years, but has since 2008 taken place every year. It was closed in its early years, but has been an open event since the 1980s. Throughout its history the Reykjavik Open has featured many of the strongest chess players in the world at the time, including Mikhail Tal, Nona Gaprindashvili, David Bronstein, Vasili Smyslov, Bent Larsen, Friðrik Ólafsson, Mark Taimanov, Lev Polugaevsky, Jan Timman, Victor Korchnoi, Samuel Reshevsky, Anthony Miles, Nigel Short, Hikaru Nakamura, Judit Polgar, Magnus Carlsen, Alexander Grischuk, Fabiano Caruana and Hou Yifan.  Official site: reykjavikopen.com

Games can be followed live HERE on livestream or on the Chessbomb site.
Click HERE to view the chess results of the various rounds of the tournament and rankings/pairings on the site of chess-results.com.
Reykjavik_Giri_round1
Round 1 – Anish Giri

Reykjavik_round1_anish_giri

Reykjavik_Navara_round1
Round 1 David Navara 1-0

moves 17-20 – 17. O-O  Bc3   18. Ne7+ Kh8   19. Qd6 Ra6   20. Bxa6 1-0

Reykjavik_round1_Ivan_Cheparinov

Claude Hoegener vs Ivan Cheparinov 0-1 End position

Moves

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. dxc5 Nc6 5. cxd6 Nxe4 6. Nf3 Nxd6 7. h3 e5 8. Na3 f6 9. Nc4 Be6 10. Nxd6+ Bxd6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Qa4 Kh8 13. Rd1 Qe7 14. Bc4 Bd7 15. Qc2 e4 16. Qd2 exf3 17. gxf3 Bb8 18. Qxd7 Qxd7 19. Rxd7 Ne5 20. Be6 Nxd7 21. Bxd7 Bc7 22. O-O Rad8 23. Bf5 Bb6 24. Bc1 g6 25. Be4 Rd7 26. c4 Re8 27. b4 f5 28. c5 fxe4 29. cxb6 axb6 30. Be3 exf3 31. Bxb6 Re6 32. Bc5 Ra6 33. Re1 Rxa2 34. Re3 Rd1+ 35. Kh2 Rxf2+ 36. Kg3 Re2 37. Rxf3 Kg8 38. h4 h5 39. Rc3 Re4 0-1

Reykjavik_Cheparinov

Moves  – Cheparinov 1 – Wang 0 – Round 2

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. h3 Be6 9. Qf3 Nbd7 10. g4 Nb6 11. O-O-O Rc8 12. Nc5 O-O 13. g5 Nfd7 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Qg4 Kh8 16. g6 Rf4 17. Bxf4 exf4 18. Qxe6 Ne5 19. gxh7 Qc7 20. Rg1 Rf8 21. Bc4 Kxh7 22. Bb3 Qd7 23. h4 Qxe6 24. Bxe6 Rf6 25. Bf5+ g6 26. Rxg6 Nxg6 27. h5 Kg7 28. hxg6 Rf8 29. Ne2 Rh8 30. Rg1 Nc4 31. Nd4 f3 32. Ne6+ Kg8 33. b3 Ne5 34. g7 Rh5 35. Kd1 Bh4 36. Nf4 Rg5 37. Rxg5 Bxg5 38. Nh5 Bh6 39. Be6+ Nf7 40. c4 b6 41. Kc2 a5 42. Kd3 Bg5 43. e5 dxe5 44. Ke4 Bh6 45. Kf5 Bxg7 46. Nxg7 Kxg7 47. Bxf7 Kxf7 48. Kxe5 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_

Round 3 – Cheparinov vs Huang position after move 24

Moves up to move 24
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. b3 Bg7 4. Bb2 O-O 5. g3 d6 6. d4 e5 7. dxe5 Nfd7 8. Nc3 dxe5 9. Qc2 Nc6 10. Rd1 Re8 11. Nd5 Nc5 12. b4 Bf5 13. Qc1 Na4 14. Ba1 Nd4 15. Ne3 Be4 16. Bg2 Qe7 17. Kf1 Rad8 18. c5 a5 19. bxa5 Nxc5 20. Ne1 Bh6 21. Bc3 Bxg2+ 22. N1xg2 Ne4 23. Be1 Qe6 24. Qb1 Nd6 *

Reykjavik_Navara

Navara vs Ris – Round 4 Endposition    1-0 

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. e4 Bg4 8. Bb5+ c6 9. Ng5 O-O 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 Na6 12. Qh3 h6 13. Nf3 Qd7 14. Qh4 g5 15. Bxg5 hxg5 16. Nxg5 Rfd8 17. Qh5 e5 18. O-O f6 19. Qh7+ Kf8 20. f4 exd4 21. f5 fxg5 22. f6 Bh8 23. Qxh8+ Kf7 24. Qg7+ Ke6 25. f7 Kd6 26. Nxd4 Kc7 27. Qe5+ Qd6 28. Ne6+ 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round4

Cheparinov Round 4 Endposition 1/2

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O exd4 8. Nxd4 Re8 9. f3 c6 10. Kh1 Nbd7 11. Bf4 Ne5 12. Qd2 a5 13. b3 Nfd7 14. Bg5 f6 15. Bh6 Bxh6 16. Qxh6 Nc5 17. Rad1 Nf7 18. Qd2 Bd7 19. Rfe1 Qb6 20. Nc2 f5 21. Qd4 Qd8 22. exf5 Bxf5 23. Ne3 Bd7 24. Bf1 Ne6 25. Qd2 Nc5 26. g3 Qf6 27. Bg2 Qg7 28. f4 Re7 29. g4 Rae8 30. g5 h6 31. h4 hxg5 32. hxg5 Qh8+ 33. Kg1 Qh4 34. Qf2 Qxf2+ 35. Kxf2 Bf5 36. Bf1 Bd7 37. Nc2 Kg7 38. Rxe7 Rxe7 39. Re1 Rxe1 40. Nxe1 Bf5 41. Ke3 Nd8 42. Nf3 Nde6 43. Nh4 Bg4 44. Bg2 Kf7 45. Ne4 Nxe4 46. Bxe4 Bh5 47. a3 Nc5 48. Bc2 b6 49. f5 gxf5 50. Nxf5 Kg6 51. b4 axb4 52. axb4 Kxg5 53. bxc5 dxc5 54. Nd6 Kf6 55. Ba4 Ke5 56. Nc8 ½-½
Standings after 4 rounds: top ten positions

1 GM Yu Yangyi CHN 2688 4.0
2 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 2678 4.0
3 GM Gajewski Grzegorz POL 2644 4.0
4 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime FRA 2715 4.0
5 GM Cheparinov Ivan BUL 2709 3.5
6 GM So Wesley PHI 2684 3.5
7 GM Giri Anish NED 2722 3.5
8 GM Socko Bartosz POL 2643 3.5
9 GM Baklan Vladimir UKR 2609 3.5
10 GM Jones Gawain ENG 2637 3.5

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round5

Round 5 -Cheparinov 1 Kristiansson 0

Round 5 – moves Cheparinov vs Kristiansson

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. d4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 a6 6. Bxd7+ Bxd7 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 Rc8 9. Nc3 e5 10. Qd3 Qa5 11. Nd2 Be6 12. Nf1 g5 13. Bg3 Nf6 14. Ne3 Be7 15. O-O Qc5 16. Rfd1 b5 17. a4 h5 18. f3 b4 19. Ne2 g4 20. Bf2 Qc6 21. c3 Rg8 22. Kh1 h4 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. exd5 Qc4 25. Qxc4 Rxc4 26. b3 Rc8 27. c4 h3 28. Ng3 hxg2+ 29. Kxg2 Kd7 30. a5 gxf3+ 31. Kxf3 Ng4 32. Bg1 f5 33. Ra4 Rb8 34. Rf1 Nh6 35. Ba7 Ra8 36. Bb6 f4 37. Ne4 Nf5 38. Rxb4 Rab8 39. Ra4 Rxb6 40. Nc5+ dxc5 41. axb6 Nd6 42. Rfa1 e4+ 43. Kxf4 Bg5+ 44. Kg4 Bf6+ 45. Kf4 Bxa1 46. Rxa1 Rf8+ 47. Kg4 Kc8 48. Rxa6 Kb7 49. Ra7+ Kxb6 50. Re7 Ka5 51. Re6 Rd8 52. Kf4 Kb4 53. Ke5 Kxb3 54. Rxd6 Rxd6 55. Kxd6 e3 0-1

Reykjavik_standings

Standings after round 5 – Top Ten

Reykjavik_pairings_round6
Pairings Round 6 – top 16 boards

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round6

Round 6 Cheparinov 0- Eljanov 1 

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 a6 5. a4 e6 6. g3 dxc4 7. Bg2 c5 8. O-O cxd4 9. Nxd4 Be7 10. a5 O-O 11. Nc2 Qc7 12. Be3 Bd7 13. Bb6 Qc8 14. Ne3 Bb5 15. Rc1 Nfd7 16. Na4 Bg5 17. f4 Nxb6 18. Nxb6 Qc5 19. Rf3 Bf6 20. Nxa8 Rd8 21. Qe1 Nc6 22. Nb6 Bd4 23. Kf2 e5 24. b4 Nxb4 25. fxe5 Nc6 26. Qd2 c3 27. Qc2 Nxe5 28. Qf5 g6 29. Qf4 Re8 30. Nd5 Qxd5 31. Kf1 Nxf3 0-1

Reykjavik_open_2013-
Pairings round 7 – 24th February at 13:00

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Indeed the name Prokofiev needs little introduction, as one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. However his connection to chess might be a little less obvious, even to the musically enlightened. As to David Oistrakh, he was one of the very greatest violinists, whose virtuosity ranked alongside Fritz Kreisler and Jasha Heifetz. Both of them were passionate chess players, though Prokofiev more than one would believe.
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev, born April 23, 1891, died March 5, 1953 was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor who mastered numerous musical genres and is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century, which include Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Among his best-known works are the 3rd Piano Concerto, the third and fifth symphonies, as well as composed family favourites, such as the ballet Romeo and Juliet – from which “Dance of the Knights” is taken – and Peter and the Wolf. Sergei Prokofiev fell in love with chess at an early age, and during his lifetime never lost his passion for the royal game, befriending chess greats such as Capablanca and Alekhine.The composer met Alekhine in his native Russia in 1900 during an international tournament held there. Alekhine was a member of the organizing committee and Prokofiev had volunteered to accommodate the guests and the players. As the years passed, their friendship solidified. He met Capablanca in January 1914 in Petersburg where the Cuban champion was playing a series of simultaneous games. Prokofiev tried his luck and even managed to win a game!

The game:
[Event “1914 Tournament”]
[Site “St. Petersburg, Russia”]
[Date “1914.05.16”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[Black “Sergei Prokofiev”]
[ECO “D02”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “86”]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 Bf5 4.Qb3 Nc6 5.Qxb7 Na5 6.Qa6 Nxc4
7.Nc3 e6 8.e4 dxe4 9.Bxc4 exf3 10.Qc6+ Nd7 11.g4 Bg6 12.Bg5
Be7 13.Bxe7 Kxe7 14.O-O-O Re8 15.h4 h5 16.gxh5 Bxh5 17.Nb5 Kf8
18.d5 Qf6 19.dxe6 Ne5 20.Qc5+ Kg8 21.exf7+ Bxf7 22.Bxf7+ Qxf7
23.Kb1 Rab8 24.Nxc7 Rbc8 25.Rc1 Re7 26.Qd6 Rexc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7
28.Qe6+ Kh8 29.a3 Qc2+ 30.Ka1 Nd3 31.Rb1 Nxf2 32.h5 Qc6 33.Qf5
Ne4 34.Qxf3 Nd2 35.Qxc6 Rxc6 36.Rd1 Rc2 37.Rg1 Rc5 38.Rg6 Rxh5
39.Ra6 Nb3+ 40.Ka2 Ra5 41.Rxa5 Nxa5 42.b4 g5 43.Kb2 g4 0-1
Another great combination: Chess and music! What’s missing is the poetry! The closest I could get was the poem by Robert Frost.  Please click HERE to read the entire article on Chessbase.

Fire and Ice – Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

You can read my entry on Dance of the knights  on this link. The music is also the theme music to The Apprentice.


A young Sergey Prokofiev with his inseparable board
and chess books. [Image: chessbase]


Prokofiev in his later years remained faithful to his true love [Image: chessbase]

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Unbelievable! I missed all of this! And I saw the tournament was coming up during the Olympics, but so so not me to forget about it! -With all these ‘posh‘ players a few miles away from me! See this link who they are. Here here are the results on the site of Fide. I was fascinated by the piece of art when I saw the image. It’s so beautiful. Some people are just more artistic than other people, so unfair. 

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This year, the voting results of the annual contest of the “64” became known later than usual. In the 10 th issue of the reports that the owner of the honorary prize was Magnus Carlsen. The Norwegian was the first chess player, who won the trophy three times in a row. The gap between him and the runner-up -Gelfand was very significant. The remaining places in the top ten was as follows: 3. Aronian 4. Svidler 5. Kramnik 6. Grischuk 7.Ivanchuk 8. Anand 9. Morozevich 10. Nakamura.

Resource: HERE  a Russian Chess website.

Chess Wedding cake of Shahriyar Mammadyarov. See more photos on this link of him and the wedding.

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Kenny Solomon
This is very exciting news for South Africa and South African Chess players. We’ve been waiting for a Chess Grandmaster. We knew it was just a matter of time…and the time has come! Congratulations to Kenny! Proudly South African!

September 11 2012 at 10:01am

Cape Town – A Mitchells Plain father who grew up in the township and played his first game of chess at 13, has become South Africa’s first chess grandmaster.

Kenny Solomon, 32 was in a team of five South Africans at the 2012 World Chess Olympiad in Istanbul for two weeks.

When results were announced at the weekend, he was one of eight international contestants awarded grandmaster – a title held for life. It is the highest title a player can attain and had been awarded to greats like Garry Kasparov and the late Bobby Fisher. To become a grandmaster a player must have a performance rating consistently above 2 500.

Solomon could not be reached as he was flying from Turkey to Italy, but Anant Dole, whom he taught chess for five years, said his rating had been around 2 600 over nine rounds at the Olympiad as well as at three other previous tournaments.

“The best rating in the world is 2 880. Kenny has been working very hard for the grandmaster title – even while he trained me he was preparing himself. He deserves it.”

Dole who lives in Constantia said Solomon moved to Italy last year to hone his skills.

“Playing top-class chess in South Africa is very difficult because there are few top-class players. Kenny was number one here, but for him it was not enough,” Dole, 19 said. He said Solomon was married with a daughter.

On his blog, Solomon said he started playing in Mitchells Plain aged 13 after his older brother, Maxwell, was flown to Manila to play in an Olympiad.

He began reading chess books, taught himself and in two years won the national championship. Also on the blog were messages, including one from a Sharon Snell who wrote: “South Africa’s first grandmaster. You are an inspiration to us all.”

Cultural Affairs and Sport MEC Ivan Meyer said: “We await with great excitement for the confirmation of his new status … making him only the second chess player from sub-Saharan Africa and only the eighth in Africa to ever achieve this.”

Please click HERE to read the original article.

Melissa Greeff – South Africa’s first Woman Grandmaster – since 2009

Read about Melissa on this link.

More Titles – source: chessa

More titles… Steel & van den Heever
Wednesday 12 September 2012

Congratulations to Henry Steel who was awarded the title of International Master (IM) for his sterling performance at the 2012 FIDE Olympiad.  Henry’s rating also surpassed the 2400 mark.  And congratulations to Donovan van den Heever who is awarded the title of FIDE Master (FM) for his rating breaking the 2300 barrier.  Well done guys!.

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Image: Susan Polgar chess blog – image edited

Anand and Gelfand – image: chessdom

Anand – image: Anastasia Karlovich

It’s again time for the FIDE World Chess Championship – this time Anand vs Gelfand at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Follow the link of the official site to read more.The prize fund is 2.55 million US Dollars. The winner gets $1,530,000 (60%) and the loser $1,020,000 (40%)
Official site: Chess FIDE Moscow

This is the second entry on my blog, on THIS LINK you can follow the first 6 games – with some chess graphics too. Six games have been played. Six draws. Is it Anand’s tactic, is he warming up? What about a prediction: 6 more draws within the next week.

Game 7 – move 8

Game 7 – Anand explained where his ‘mistake’ was – the Bishop on C8!- which he lost

Game 7 moves – [grrr for the Houdine comments in the PGN-file too- I tried to remove it neatly]

Click HERE to play through game 7. The link will open in a new window.

Anand during the interview after Game 7 – explaining his Bishop-mistake +My opinion about move 26: unnecessary lost of his Knight on E4 too.

Game 8 Anand vs Gelfand 1-0

Game 9 – Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2-12

Game 10 Anand vs Gelfand – 1/2-1/2

Game 10 moves

Countdown startinggame 11

Anand – Gelfand – taking their positions

Standings

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – move 16

Anand – game 11

Game 11 – Gelfand

Game 11 – draw agreed

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2 – 1/2

Game 12 – Anand vs Gelfand 1/2-1/2

Standings: Anand 6 – Gelfand 6. Now – for the tie break on Wednesday! Still crossing my fingers for Anand!

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It’s time for another big tournament – starting on a very special day! If you’re not sure who these ‘Kings’ are, click the Official site-link here. I might not have time blogging their games, but will follow the results of the rounds. This tournament takes place in Medias, Romania from 11-22 June.

Click HERE to go to their games – live.

Round 1
Click HERE to play through the games of round 1.

You can also the results HERE on the site of chessbase follow. There are links to play through the games played too. [All links in this post will open in a new window.]



The schedule of the tournament is the following:
– 11th of June 15:30 1st Round
– 12th of June 15:30 2nd Round
– 13th of June 15:30 3rd Round
– 14th of June 15:30 4th Round
– 15th of June 15:30 5th Round
– 16th of June Free day
– 17th of June 15:30 6th Round
– 18st of June 15:30 7th Round
– 19nd of June 15:30 8th Round
– 20th of June 15:30 9th Round
– 21st of June 13:30 10th Round
– 22nd of June Free day

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Please click HERE for the official website.

Vishy Anand, current World Champion and seven times winner of the Magistral, comes back to Leon to face the strongest Spanish player, Alexei Shirov, on the 24th edition. This tournament is already a classic, one of the most prestigious in the chess calendar.

Anand and Shirov will play in Leon with a large audio-visual setting that will allow the public to “see the chess stars thinking”, thanks to big screens and live audio comments (by GM Illescas, eight times Spanish champion) and IM Michael Rahal.

The rules, written by the prestigious arbiter Joaquin Espejo, indicate that Anand and Shirov will play six games (Friday to Sunday, two per day) with 45 minutes per side plus Thirty seconds increment after each move in the magnificent León Auditorium. If needed, there will eventually be a tie-break of several five minute games.

SCHEDULE
Thursday, June 2nd
PLAYERS ARRIVAL – 20.00 Drawing of lots, CONDE LUNA HOTEL.
Friday, June 3rd
GAMES 1 AND 2 (16.30), LEON AUDITORIUM.
Saturday, June 4th
GAMES 3 AND 4 (16.30), LEON AUDITORIUM.
Sunday, June 5th
GAMES 5 and 6 (16.30) and, eventually, tie-breaks, LEON AUDITORIUM.
Monday, June 6th – Prize giving 14:30
Simuls (17.30), LEON UNIVERSITY.

Game 1 Anand vs Shirov:1/2


Game 2- Anand vs Shirov : 1-0
Click HERE to play through their games.


Game 3 – Anand vs Shirov 1-0


Game 4 Anand vs Shirov – 1/2


Game 5- Anand vs Shirov

Game 5 – Anand vs Shirov 1/2

I love this next picture which I put together in Fireworks – it is a combination of about 10 different images.

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Israeli chess grandmaster Alik Gershon broke the Guinness World Record in Tel Aviv early Friday morning for simultaneous games played, a title previously held by an Iranian chess player.

The thirty-year-old played 527 concurrent games, winning 87% of them.
Please click HERE to read the complete article.

Gershon won 454 games, lost 11 and drew 58 games. [according to the BBC news article]

Image: chessbase – Alik Gershon [right] with Ignor Nor.

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Londonchessclassic 2010

London Chess Classic 2 – Date: 8-15 December at Olympia. I attended the London Classic I last year in December and will definitely not miss this one too as Anand [my favourite] will be playing!You can read my entry about the 2009 Classic HERE on the 12th December 2009.

Image: londonchessclassic

Heading the line-up is the world chess champion, Viswanathan Anand from India; the teenage sensation who currently outranks him on the world chess rating list, Magnus Carlsen from Norway; and Anand’s immediate predecessor as champion, Vladimir Kramnik from Russia.

Vishy Anand is the one addition to the field that contested the first London Chess Classic in December 2009. Though undisputed world champion, Anand is currently not the highest rated player in the world, but he recently wrested back third place from Kramnik, so is considered the man most likely to stop Carlsen making it two London triumphs in a row. Anand has recently stated that his ambition is to regain his number one status, so it sounds like he already has plans for his clash with the prodigiously talented Norwegian in London.AnandKramnik

Kramnik and Anand

London Chess Classic 2010 lineup

Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2826

Anand, Viswanathan IND 2800

Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2780

Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2733

Adams, Michael ENG 2728

Short, Nigel D ENG 2690

McShane, Luke J ENG 2657

Howell, David W L ENG 2616

Click here for entry forms – to take part in the tournamnet [yes, you can play there too] and here for tickets.

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Anand…my favourite – image: Official site

 

Schedule

See the image/link to the Official site on my blog’s sidebar [top right]. The link will open in a new window.

Round 1: Topalov vs Anand –  move 19 [click on images for a larger view]

Round 1 move 23

Move 25

Round 1 move 29 – big trouble – Anand has resigned this game

Topalov – 1 Anand – 0

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC2010”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.24”]
[Round “1.22”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “D87”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “59”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Na5 11. Bd3 b6 12. Qd2 e5 13. Bh6 cxd4 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. cxd4 exd4 16. Rac1 Qd6 17. f4 f6 18. f5 Qe5 19. Nf4 g5 20. Nh5+ Kg8 21. h4 h6 22. hxg5 hxg5 23. Rf3 Kf7 24. Nxf6 Kxf6 25. Rh3 Rg8 26. Rh6+ Kf7 27. Rh7+Ke8 28. Rcc7 Kd8 29. Bb5 Qxe4 30. Rxc8+ 1-0

Game 2 Image: Chessdom
ROUND 2 – Sunday 25th April: Anand 1-Topalov 0

Anand vs Topalov Round 2 move 14

Round 2 move 16

Round 2 move 19

Round 2 move 28

Round 2 move 32

Round 2 move 37

Round 2: End position

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC2010 game_2”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.??”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “85”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8. Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bd2 Nd5 11. Rc1 Nd7 12. Nd3 Ba7 13. Ba5 Qe7 14. Qb3 Rb8 15. Qa3 Qxa3 16. bxa3 N7f6 17. Nce5 Re8 18. Rc2 b6 19. Bd2 Bb7 20. Rfc1 Rbd8 21. f4 Bb8 22. a4 a5 23. Nc6 Bxc6 24. Rxc6 h5 25. R1c4 Ne3 26. Bxe3 dxe3 27. Bf3 g6 28. Rxb6 Ba7 29. Rb3 Rd4 30. Rc7 Bb8 31. Rc5 Bd6 32. Rxa5 Rc8 33.Kg2 Rc2 34. a3 Ra2 35. Nb4 Bxb4 36. axb4 Nd5 37. b5 Raxa4 38. Rxa4 Rxa4 39. Bxd5 exd5 40. b6 Ra8 41. b7 Rb8 42. Kf3 d4 43. Ke4 1-0

 Anand 1-Topalov 0

Anand Image: Chessdom


Image: Chessdom

Game 3 Topalov vs Anand – Move 26

Game 3 Final Position

Game 3: Topalov 1/2 – Anand 1/2

Results after round 3: Anand 1 1/2   –   Topalov  1 1/2

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_3”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.27”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “D17”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[BlackElo “2787”]
[PlyCount “91”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BTN”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4 Bg6
9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14. Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h6 16. Ke2 Bd6 17. h5 Bh7 18. a5 Ke7 19. Na4 f6 20. b4 Rgc8 21. Bc5 Bxc5 22. bxc5 Rc7 23. Nb6 Rd8 24. Nxd7 Rdxd7 25. Bd3 Bg8 26. c6 Rd6 27. cxb7 Rxb7 28. Rc3 Bf7 29. Ke3 Be8 30. g4 e5 31. Rhc1 Bd7 32. Rc5 Bb5 33. Bxb5 axb5 34. Rb1 b4 35. Rb3 Ra6 36. Kd3 Rba7 37. Rxb4 Rxa5 38. Rxa5 Rxa5 39. Rb7+ Kf8 40. Ke2 Ra2+ 41. Ke3 Ra3+ 42. Kf2 Ra2+ 43. Ke3 Ra3+ 44. Kf2 Ra2+ 45. Ke3 Ra3+ 46. Kf2 1/2-1/2


Image: Chessdom

Game 4

Game 4 move 25

Anand 1 – Topalov 0

Game 4: Final Position – Anand 1 – Topalov 0

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_4”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.28”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “63”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 a5 7. Qc2 Bxd2+ 8.
Qxd2 c6 9. a4 b5 10. Na3 Bd7 11. Ne5 Nd5 12. e4 Nb4 13. O-O O-O 14. Rfd1 Be8 15. d5 Qd6 16. Ng4 Qc5 17. Ne3 N8a6 18. dxc6 bxa4 19. Naxc4 Bxc6 20. Rac1 h6 21. Nd6 Qa7 22. Ng4 Rad8 23. Nxh6+ gxh6 24. Qxh6 f6 25. e5 Bxg2 26. exf6 Rxd6 27. Rxd6 Be4 28. Rxe6 Nd3 29. Rc2 Qh7 30. f7+ Qxf7 31. Rxe4 Qf5 32. Re7 1-0

Game 4 – Anand vs Topalov

Anand – Game 4 -28th April
Game 4: Anand leads by one point after the second Catalan opening in the match.

The fourth game of the FIDE World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand of India and Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria saw another Catalan opening on the board. This is the first opening that was played twice in the match, the players are obviously willing to have a theoretical discussion. Topalov was the one to deviate from the second game, as early as on move 5, when he played the sharper Bb4+ instead of a6.

Similar to the earlier Catalan game, Black clutched onto the extra pawn while White tried to take advantage of his faster pieces’ development. Anand aggressively advanced in the center to break opponent’s pawn formation and open up the files and diagonals. At the same time, Topalov was carefully clearing the queenside in order to reduce the positional pressure.

The game appeared to be taking a normal course but then Anand’s sudden Knight movement (e3-g4) caught Topalov without guard and on the wrong foot. Not hesitating much, Anand knocked a piece sacrifice on h6 and picked a strong attack against the Black King. Still precision was needed in carrying out the assault, but Anand never blinked and found the crushing 25. e5!

Topalov continued for a few moves more, but resigned at the imminent danger of a mate. Anand takes the lead in the match 2,5-1,5, tomorrow is a rest day and the games continue on Friday at 15:00 Source: Official Site

Anand crushes Topalov in fourth game

The fourth game of the World chess championship match in Sofia saw Viswanathan Anand’s best performance to date with a slashing attack against challenger Veselin Topalov.

“Anand really played brilliantly today,” said commentator Zurab Azmaiparashvili, having watched the World champion sacrifice a pawn, then a knight and then a bishop to create a winning assault against

Topalov’s exposed king.

Anand was pleased with his performance. “It was a very complex position with a lot of tension on the queenside,” said Anand. “I thought (my 23rd move) was clinching it but you can’t be 100 per cent sure.”

Anand explained that in a key variation he was prepared to give away both his rooks as well to ensure a checkmate: “Once I saw that I knew I was winning.”

Poor start
After a poor start, Anand, 40, has taken the lead for the first time in the €2 million match and the Bulgarian challenger is looking shaky. “I though I had a decent position,” said Topalov, “but if I was able to answer so simply what went wrong then the result might have been different.

“Certainly my (20th move) was especially bad.”

Playing with white pieces, Anand used the Catalan Opening which had brought him success in game two but Topalov, 35, defended differently this time. Soon Anand sacrificed a pawn and Topalov needed no invitation to grab the material and attempt to hang on to it.

Anand’s unorthodox 10th move, moving a knight to the edge of the board, appeared to be new. However, a member of Team Anand, computer expert Eric van Reem, explained that Anand was following an earlier game, a precedent apparently unknown to Topalov who began thinking hard for the first time in the game.

Excellent compensation
Soon it became clear that Anand had excellent compensation for his pawn when the apparently offside knight moved to the centre, stymieing Topalov’s freedom of movement. Although the position was highly unbalanced — the type of game at which Topalov usually excels — Anand’s speed of play indicated that he had checked the ideas at home with his team and had everything under control.

Anand was coy when asked if the sacrifices were prepared with his team. “I won’t be able to tell you that until the match is over,” said Anand, who has managed to keep the identity of some of his helpers secret as well.

On the 23rd move, after cogitating for only five minutes, Anand sacrificed a knight and Topalov immediately found his king under massive fire. Another sacrifice followed and Topalov was soon defenceless. The challenger resigned after 32 moves and three-and-a-half hours’ play.

Anand leads Topalov 2.5-1.5 with eight games remaining after Wednesday’s encounter. The fifth game, with Topalov holding the first move, will be played on Friday starting at 5.30 p.m. IST. Source:
http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/article414219.ece
GAME 5 – 30th April -Topalov vs Anand 1/2

Bulgaria Chess Master Topalov Hopes to Crush Anand’s Defense

Click on the image for a clear view -the article continues here:

“We hope to have finally figured out the secret of Anand’s defense. We have five people on our team working with top notch computers on this task, and we hope to see results today,” Danailov explained.

The first move of the fifth game of the Sofia World Chess Title Match was made Friday by Nobel Prize winning professor of economics Robert Mundell, known as “the father of the euro”.

Danailov said Topalov’s team met Professor Mundell during a tournament in China which was won by the Bulgarian chess master.

“I wanted to invite Professor Mundell as a guest during the last M-Tel Masters tournament but he was busy then. This time, however, he managed to find time to be our guest,” Danailov explained.

“It is a pleasure for me to be here. I have come as an economist and a fan of chess,” said the Nobel Prize laureate expressing his happiness to be present at the event.

Source: novinite.com

Game 5 move 17

Game 5 move 32

Game 5 move 39

Game 5 move 42 – Topalov vs Anand 1/2

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_5”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.30”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “D17”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[BlackElo “2787”]
[PlyCount “87”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4 Bg6
9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14. Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h5 16. Ne2 Bd6 17. Be3 Ne5 18. Nf4 Rc8 19. Bb3 Rxc1+ 20. Bxc1 Ke7 21. Ke2 Rc8 22. Bd2 f6 23. Nxg6+ Nxg6 24. g3 Ne5 25. f4 Nc6 26. Bc3 Bb4 27. Bxb4+ Nxb4 28. Rd1 Nc6 29. Rd2 g5 30. Kf2 g4 31. Rc2 Rd8 32. Ke3 Rd6 33. Rc5 Nb4 34. Rc7+ Kd8 35. Rc3 Ke7 36. e5 Rd7 37. exf6+ Kxf6 38. Ke2 Nc6 39. Ke1 Nd4 40. Bd1 a5 41. Rc5 Nf5 42. Rc3 Nd4 43. Rc5 Nf5 44. Rc3 1/2-1/2

News/comments from the Official site:

After the second rest day, the FIDE World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand of India and Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria continued today with game five in which Topalov played with White pieces.

The first symbolic move were made by the “father of the euro” professor Robert Mundell. The President of Bulgaria Mr. Georgi Parvanov visited the match.

The opening was replay of game three in which Anand used the Slav defence and comfortably held a draw. The expectation were that Topalov will find an improvement in the variation and fight for opening advantage.

But it was Anand who first diverted from the earlier game by moving 15…h5 instead of 15…h6. Topalov continued with the logical 16. Ne2 having in mind Nf4, to exploit the newly created situation with Black pawn on h5. Anand established strong Knight outpost on e5 and traded off a pair of Rooks to reduce White’s chances of gaining initiative.

After further exchange of minor pieces, an endgame with Rook and Bishop versus Rook and Knight has arisen. Anand’s 29…g5 initiated changes in the pawn structure, which allowed him to solve one issue and concentrate on pieces’ play.

Black Knight gradually suppressed White Bishop, which eventually landed on the backward d1-square. Right after the time-control, Topalov offered moves repetition before the situation goes out of the hand. Or perhaps it was a psychological move, attempting to test Anand’s resolve to play for a win, in case of which White would also have chances for full point.

But Anand needed no risk and accepted the threefold repetition. Draw signed on move 44. The current score is 3-2 in favour of Anand who tomorrow plays with White pieces. Live coverage on the official website starting at 14:45 local time.

Anand blacks out Topalov’s ambitions

Viswanathan Anand has retained his narrow lead over Veselin Topalov with a solid draw in the fifth game of the Indian’s world title defence in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Anand, playing black for the third time in the match, repeated the Slav opening which had neutralised Topalov’s ambitions in game three, and also came armed with a new 15th move.

Soon afterwards, as Anand was considering his 17th move, the playing hall — and indeed the entire Military Club — was plunged into darkness by a power blackout. The game timers were stopped by the arbiter but both players remained firmly in their seats, analysing in the dark.

Ten minutes later, emergency power provided some flickering light on the stage and five minutes later the light was good enough for the game to resume.

“I don’t know what would have happened if the lights had not gone on for an hour or more,” admitted Anand. “I don’t know what the rules are for such a situation.”

However, while play continued, the video screen above the players, relaying the game to the audience in the Military Club and to hundreds of thousands of viewers on the internet, remained inoperable. Audible protests from some of the frustrated spectators in the theatre were quickly muted by security guards and five minutes later normal broadcasting of the moves resumed.

Both players reacted calmly to the unexpected interruption, although Anand spent some time re-orientating himself with the position before he made his next move.

“It is very easy to make a mistake after a break in concentration like this,” said Anand, “so I decided to invest an extra ten minutes just to be sure.”

Once again Anand’s opening preparation proved superior to that of his Bulgarian challenger. “I missed Anand’s [22nd move],” confessed Topalov. “It was very strong. I will need to be more precise in future games.”

With other strong pawn moves Anand soon solved all his problems. “I managed to stabilise the position,” explained Anand, “after which I have nothing to complain about.”

Before long Topalov found himself staring at an equal endgame which offered no chances for a win to either player. After four hours play, both players could find nothing better than to repeat moves and a draw was agreed after 44 moves.

The draw was a perfectly satisfactory result for Anand as he retains a 3-2 lead in the best-of-12 contest and will hold the advantage of the first move, equivalent to the serve in tennis, in the next two games.

Anand refused, however, to express any comment on the state of the match so far, saying “I’m just taking it game by game.”

The sixth game will be played on May 1 starting at 17.30 IST. Source:
http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/article418770.ece
 

Anand vs Topalov…game 6

ANAND vs TOPALOV Game 6

Anand vs Topalov game 6 move 7 – click on images for a larger view

Game 6 move 27

Game 6 move 35

Game 6 move 48

Game 6 End position – Anand 1/2 Topalov 1/2

Game 6

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_6”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.05.01”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “116”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8. Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nd3 Ba7 13. Qa4 Nc6 14. Rac1 e5 15. Bxc6 b5 16. Qc2 Qxc6 17. Ncxe5 Qe4 18. Qc6 Bb7 19. Qxe4 Bxe4 20. Rc2 Rfe8 21. Rfc1 f6 22. Nd7 Bf5 23. N7c5 Bb6 24. Nb7 Bd7 25. Nf4 Rab8 26. Nd6 Re5 27. Nc8 Ba5 28. Nd3 Re8 29. Na7 Bb6 30. Nc6 Rb7 31. Ncb4 a5 32. Nd5 a4 33. Nxb6 Rxb6 34. Nc5 Bf5 35. Rd2 Rc6 36. b4 axb3 37. axb3 b4 38. Rxd4 Rxe2 39. Rxb4 Bh3 40. Rbc4 Rd6 41. Re4 Rb2 42. Ree1 Rdd2 43. Ne4 Rd4 44. Nc5 Rdd2 45. Ne4 Rd3 46. Rb1 Rdxb3 47. Nd2 Rb4 48. f3 g5 49. Rxb2 Rxb2 50. Rd1 Kf7 51. Kf2 h5 52. Ke3 Rc2 53. Ra1 Kg6 54. Ra6 Bf5 55. Rd6 Rc3+ 56. Kf2 Rc2 57. Ke3 Rc3+ 58. Kf2 Rc2 1/2-1/2

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Results: Round 4 – Saturday 12th December

On the way to the Olympia Centre – where the London Chess Classic is being held

Black bird in a tree

Hammersmith-area – traffic and weather

The players…

Kramnik looked away shyly when I winked at him [hehe] and Nigel suddenly said to Michael Adams…you know what, she’s the only woman around here![NOT – there were many others]

aha! got him smiling!

The stage

And everyone wants the best shot

And I got mine too

Kramnik watching the electronic board

The electronic board, we were allowed to click-click only the first 5 min into the games

A Semi-giant set in the foyer – a lovely set

Art in the foyer, do I see a pawn’s head in this piece of art – or is it my chess-brain working overtime?[hehe]

bikes outside

Headless London pawns lined-up – standing vigilant – for McShane’s and Howell’s game?

Into the night

My impression/opinion of the London Chess Classic

It was great to see these GM’s in real life, they are all great people and great players. It was great to see them playing  live on the stage, to see how they respond and their reactions during a tournament. I was very excited to see them as Kramnik is one of my favourite players. Carlsen too, as he’s young and many students can associate with him and he can be of an inspiration to many young players wanting to reach their goal of becoming a GM too?

The venue was great, it wasn’t my first time at the Olympia. If I can have a moan about a few things and maybe, just maybe someone will pick it up and do something about it. Firstly, the Ladies’ toilet near the auditorium was changed into a Gents room. The nearest Ladies was in the East Hall in a maze of corridors with doors enough to take 6mil people to heaven at any one time. I waited for an old lady as I knew she wasn’t going to find her way back. She was already stressed out when she saw me, saying she found it hard to find it – despite the little arrows you could follow. Secondly, the T-shirts were all in sizes Large -and up and then in a small, but no medium-sized-shirts. I was told by Philippa – the wife of Malcolm Pein [organiser of the tournament] – she’s an ex Saffa and spoke to me in Afrikaans, how nice! – that these shirts were not available in a medium-size- as they reasoned that females were not really going to buy it – duh! Was I going to be the only female wanting a shirt? Then I must be of a very rare specie! I did buy a large though, a mug and a pen. I think I will sleep in this large, baggy shirt.[lol]

The games. The chess games were great – sort of. I was very annoyed with Howell and McShane’s game. They didn’t have a good game, it was a boring game, right from the start. Later on I didn’t even follow their game on the board. Magnus played a good game up to a point and I lost interest. Kramnik’s game wasn’t up to the standard I expected from him and I didn’t follow his game – they finished first and quite early too. I was still thinking how to go about to get some autographs when Kramnik disappeared from the stage. One guy was lucky, he was near the exit on Kramnik’s side. You would think they would go to the foyer to mingle with the common chess players and where you can grab them for an autograph. I lost interest in all the games that were left and we left about 6pm. Our parking ticket was £25, all worth it, but will I do it again to see my favourite players in action? I don’t know, maybe. Maybe if us women don’t have to walk two miles for a ladies room, the chess games worth it and t-shirts in medium size [lol] [I must add, the first time I did use the toilet for disabled people, but I was given the look when I wanted to use it again]

On this photo I’m sitting on the right at the far end – you can’t see me! but you can see hubby on the left. The photo is from the official site. We played three games. We arrived at about 12:15-ish and played till about 13:40.

Denise Frick – South African-player taking part in the Women’s Invitational – image: Official site

Plippa – at the bookstall – image: Official site

The games

[Event “London Chess Classic”]
[Site “London ENG”]
[Date “2009.12.12”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Carlsen, Magnus “]
[Black “Nakamura, Hikaru “]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ChessCat “CHESSCAT 1.0”]
[ECO “D17”]
[Opening “QGD Slav”]
[PlyCount “90”]
[Variation “Czech defence”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Nh4 Bc8 7.e3 e5 8.Bxc4 exd4 9.exd4 Be7 10.O-O O-O 11.Re1 Nd5 12.Nf3 Be6 13.Qb3 Na6 14.Bd2 Nab4 15.Ne4 Bf5 16.Ne5 a5 17.Nc5 Bxc5 18.dxc5 Qc7 19.Bxb4 Nxb4 20.Qf3 Be6 21.Bxe6 fxe6 22.Qb3 Qe7 23.Nf3 Nd5 24.Rac1 Rf4 25.Ne5 Raf8 26.Nd3 Rd4 27.Rc4 Rxc4 28.Qxc4 Qf6 29.g3 Rd8 30.Kg2 Qf5 31.Nc1 Rf8 32.Qe2 Nc7 33.Nd3 Rd8 34.Ne5 Rd5 35.Kg1 Rxc5 36.Nc4 Qf8 37.Rd1 Rd5 38.Rxd5 exd5 39.Qe5 dxc4 40.Qxc7 Qb4 41.Qc8+ Kf7 42.Qf5+ Ke7 43.Qe5+ Kf7 44.Qf5+ Ke7 45.Qe5+ Kf7
1/2-1/2

[Event “London Chess Classic”]
[Site “London ENG”]
[Date “2009.12.12”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Kramnik, Vladimir “]
[Black “Adams, Michael”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ChessCat “CHESSCAT 1.0”]
[ECO “D37”]
[Opening “QGD”]
[PlyCount “92”]
[Variation “classical variation (5.Bf4)”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 O-O 6.e3 Nbd7 7.a3 c5 8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.Nxd5 exd5 10.dxc5 Nxc5 11.Be5 Bg4 12.Be2 Ne6 13.h3 Bxf3 14.Bxf3 d4 15.Bxd4 Nxd4 16.Qxd4 Qxd4 17.exd4 Rac8 18.O-O Rc7 19.Rad1 Rd8 20.Rfe1 Kf8 21.Re2 g6 22.g3 Bf6 23.d5 Be7 24.Kg2 Bd6 25.Rde1 Rc5 26.Be4 Rdc8 27.f4 Rc1 28.Kf3 Rxe1 29.Rxe1 Rc5 30.g4 a5 31.a4 Rc4 32.b3 Rc3+ 33.Re3 Rxe3+ 34.Kxe3 h6 35.f5 gxf5 36.Bxf5 Ke7 37.h4 f6 38.Bc8 b6 39.Ke4 Bg3 40.h5 Bh4 41.Kf5 Bg5 42.Kg6 Kd6 43.Be6 Ke7 44.Bc8 Kd6 45.Be6 Ke7 46.Bc8 Kd6
1/2-1/2

[Event “London Chess Classic”]
[Site “London ENG”]
[Date “2009.12.12”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Short, Nigel”]
[Black “Ni Hua “]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ChessCat “CHESSCAT 1.0”]
[ECO “C11”]
[Opening “French”]
[PlyCount “127”]
[Variation “Burn variation”]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxe4 5.Nxe4 Nbd7 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.c3 h6 8.Bh4 c5 9.Bxf6 gxf6 10.Qf3 cxd4 11.Bb5+ Ke7 12.Ne2 Qd5 13.Qxd5 exd5 14.Nxd4 f5 15.O-O-O Kf6 16.Ne2 Be6 17.Nf4 Rd8 18.Bc4 d4 19.Bxe6 fxe6 20.Rxd4 Bc5 21.Rxd8 Rxd8 22.Nh3 h5 23.Re1 e5 24.Re2 e4 25.Kc2 h4 26.f3 Re8 27.fxe4 fxe4 28.b4 Bd6 29.Rf2+ Ke5 30.Ng1 Rg8 31.g3 hxg3 32.hxg3 Rxg3 33.Ne2 Rf3 34.Rg2 Kd5 35.Nd4 Rh3 36.Nb5 Be5 37.Rd2+ Ke6 38.Nd4+ Bxd4 39.Rxd4 Rh2+ 40.Kb3 Re2 41.a4 e3 42.Kc4 Ra2 43.a5 e2 44.Re4+ Kd6 45.Kd3 b6 46.axb6 axb6 47.Rxe2 Rxe2 48.Kxe2 b5 49.Kd2 Ke6 50.Kd1 Kd5 51.Kc2 Kd6 52.Kd2 Ke6 53.Ke3 Ke5 54.Kd3 Kd5 55.c4+ bxc4+ 56.Kc3 Kc6 57.Kxc4 Kb6 58.b5 Kb7 59.Kc5 Kc7 60.b6+ Kb7 61.Kb5 Kb8 62.Kc6 Kc8 63.b7+ Kb8 64.Kb6
1/2-1/2

[Event “London Chess Classic”]
[Site “London ENG”]
[Date “2009.12.12”]
[Round “4”]
[White “McShane, Luke “]
[Black “Howell, David “]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ChessCat “CHESSCAT 1.0”]
[ECO “A15”]
[Opening “English opening”]
[PlyCount “79”]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Qa4+ Nc6 6.Ne5 Qd6 7.Nxc6 Qxc6 8.Qxc6+ bxc6 9.g3 Bg7 10.Bg2 Rb8 11.b3 O-O 12.Bb2 Nxc3 13.Bxc3 Bxc3 14.dxc3 c5 15.O-O-O Rb6 16.c4 Rd6 17.Rd5 Bb7 18.Rxd6 Bxg2 19.Rdd1 Bxh1 20.Rxh1 Rd8 21.Rd1 Rxd1+ 22.Kxd1 Kf8 23.Kd2 Ke8 24.Ke3 Kd7 25.g4 f6 26.Ke4 Ke6 27.h3 f5+ 28.Kf4 Kf6 29.g5+ Ke6 30.e4 fxe4 31.Kxe4 Kd6 32.f4 e6 33.h4 a6 34.a3 a5 35.Kf3 e5 36.Ke4 exf4 37.Kxf4 Ke6 38.Ke4 Kd6 39.Kf4 Ke6 40.Ke4
1/2-1/2

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MTEL02

 If you have thought you’ve seen all the “big game” of the Chess World the past week on my blog…then you haven’t seen these “Chess Engines” of the Chess World. These guys look very serious and I think they mean it serious when it comes to chess. Shirov is currently playing in Azerbaijan too! Topalov will again have a blindfolded game – like last year. Ivanchuk is last year’s winner, wonder what will happen this year. On the official site you can read more player info by clicking on their images.
Click HERE to read the interview with Topalov about his chess.

Please click HERE for the Official site. On my blog’s side bar (top right) you will find the link to LIVE-games. All images: Ivan A. Grigorov for mtelmasters

Mtel 01
Vassily Ivanchuk, is a Ukrainian Grandmaster. His an ELO of 2787 on the FIDE January 2008 list, making him number 9 in the World and Ukraine’s number one. He played board one on the victorious Ukraine team at the 2004 Calvia Olympiad. As of November 2007 he is the World Blitz Chess champion.

Mtel 1


World Champion to comment M-Tel Masters
 The World Champion in chess Antoaneta Stefanova will comment the games from the fifth edition of the super chess tournament M-Tel Masters. The competition will start on 12 May. For the title up to 23 May will compete the leader in the world ranking Veselin Topalov, Magnus Carlsen from Norway, the last year’s winner Vassily Ivanchuk from Ukraine, Leinier Dominguez from Cuba, Alexei Shirov from Spain and Yue Wang from China. The average ELO of the participants is 2755, which makes the tournament FIDE 21st category. Only five tournaments in history have been of that rank so far.

Bulgaria’s all time strongest female player won the chess crown at the World Championship in Elista in 2004. She is currently fourth in the ladies’ world ranking with an ELO of 2549.

The commentator’s place of Stefanova will be meters away from glass pavilion where the games from the tournament will be played. Her guests will be Bulgarian GMs and after each game she will be able to analyze the game with the participants.

The comments and analysis of Stefanova will be heard also online in real time on the web site of the tournament  www. mtelmasters.com. The games from the tournament will start every day at 16:00 local time, only the last round’s games will begin at 15:00.

Masters playing

The Venue: A glass pavilion on the square in front of the National Theatre Ivan Vazov – image: Official site

schedule

MTel first move

The first move made by the mayor of Sofia. MTel has started.

Mtel1

The Glass house where the tournament is taking place – in front of the National Theatre Ivan Vazov

MTel3

Topalov blind folded

Topalov played a game blindfolded.

Mtel round1

Players ready for round 1

Mtel round1a

The first move..by the mayor of Sofia.

The Mtel Chess Masters Round 2- Images: Mtel Official site

The Mtel Chess Masters Round 2- Images: Mtel Official site

Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 move 7

Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 move 7

Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 end position 1/2

Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 end position 1/2

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 move 7

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 move 7

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 end position 0-1

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 end position 0-1

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 move 7

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 move 7

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 end position 1/2

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 end position 1/2

 Round 3

Magnus Carlsen - Images: MTel

Magnus Carlsen - Images: MTel

Wang vs Shirov

Wang vs Shirov

MTel Chess Round 3 Wang vs Shirov end position 1/2

MTel Chess Round 3 Wang vs Shirov end position 1/2

MTel Chess Round 3 Carlsen vs Ivanchuk move 41

MTel Chess Round 3 Carlsen vs Ivanchuk move 41

MTel Chess Round 3 Topalov vs Dominguez move 41

MTel Chess Round 3 Topalov vs Dominguez move 41

Carlsen vs Ivanchuk

Carlsen vs Ivanchuk

Topalov

Topalov

Pairings Rounds: 4-5-6

Pairings Rounds: 4-5-6

 Round 4 – Results: 16th May 2009

Round 4 Carlsen vs Shirov move 7

Round 4 Carlsen vs Shirov move 7

Round 4 Carlsen vs Shirov end position

Round 4 Carlsen vs Shirov end position

Round 4 Dominguez vs Ivanchuk move 7

Round 4 Dominguez vs Ivanchuk move 7

Round 4 Dominguez vs Ivanchuk end position

Round 4 Dominguez vs Ivanchuk end position

Round 4 Topalov vs Wang move 7

Round 4 Topalov vs Wang move 7

Round 4 Topalov vs Wang end position

Round 4 Topalov vs Wang end position

In both problems white moves and mates in two moves

In both problems white moves and mates in two moves

See the “news”-link on the official site for Kostadinov’s Challenge. You can send your solution to him, his email is on the link too.

Round 5: 17th May 2009

Round 5 Topalov

Topalov – round 5

Mtel round 5

Supporters follow the games outside the glass house

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 7

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 7

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 22

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 22

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 30

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 30

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 44

Round 5 Ivanchuk vs Topalov move 44

 chess football01

Chess football – results- MTel-United 8!

Players played football on their day of rest. This is the evidence to show chess players are good at football too!

chess football 01

chess football02

chessfootball2

Round 6: Results

Round 6: Dominguez vs Wang 1/2

Round 6: Dominguez vs Wang 1/2

 Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen move 7

Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen move 7

Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen move 21

Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen move 21

Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen end position

Round 6 Topalov vs Carlsen end position 1/2

Round 6 Shirov vs Ivanchuk

Round 6 Shirov vs Ivanchuk 1-0

round 6

Round 6: Shirov and Topalov

Results: Round 7

Topalov vs Shirov – 1/2

Carlsen vs Dominguez – 1-0

Wang vs Ivanchuk – 1/2

Results: Round 8

[Event “5th M-Tel Masters round_8”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2009.05.21”]
[Round “8.1”]
[
White “Shirov, Alexei”]
[Black “Wang, Yue”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2745”]
[BlackElo “2738”]
[PlyCount “87”]
[EventDate “2009.05.13”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “10”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]
[EventCategory “21”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 c5 6. O-O Nc6 7. Qa4 Bd7 8. Qxc4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 Rc8 10. Nc3 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 Bc5 12. Qh4 O-O 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 16. Bxb7 Rb8 17. Bf3 Rxb2 18. Rfd1 Be8 19. Ne4 Be7 20. Nd6 Bxd6 21. Rxd6 Bb5 22. Kf1 Rb8 23.a4 Bc4 24. Rc1 Rb1 25. Rd8+ Kg7 26. Rxb8 Rxc1+ 27. Kg2 Rc2 28. Rc8 Bb3 29. Rxc2 Bxc2 30. a5 f5 31. Bh5 Kf6 32. f4 Ke7 33. Kh3 Be4 34. Kh4 Kf6 35. h3 Kg7 36. e3 Bd3 37. Bf3 Bc2 38. g4 fxg4 39. hxg4 f6 40. Bc6 Bd1 41. Bd7 Kf7 42. Bc8 Be2 43. Bd7 Bd1 44. Bc8 1/2-1/2

[Event “5th M-Tel Masters round_8”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2009.05.21”]
[Round “8.2”]
[White “Ivanchuk, Vassily”]
[Black “Carlsen, Magnus”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B77”]
[WhiteElo “2746”]
[BlackElo “2770”]
[PlyCount “81”]
[EventDate “2009.05.13”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “10”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]
[EventCategory “21”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 g6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Bc4 O-O 8.
Bb3 d6 9. f3 Bd7 10. Qd2 Nxd4 11. Bxd4 b5 12. h4 a5 13. a4 bxa4 14. Bxa4 h5 15.O-O Rb8 16. Bxd7 Nxd7 17. b3 Bxd4+ 18. Qxd4 Qb6 19. Qxb6 Nxb6 20. Nd1 Rfc8 21.Ne3 Ra8 22. Ra2 a4 23. Rfa1 axb3 24. Rxa8 Nxa8 25. cxb3 Nb6 26. Ra7 Rc3 27. Kf2 e6 28. Rb7 Rxb3 29. Nc4 Rxf3+ 30. gxf3 Nxc4 31. Rb4 d5 32. exd5 exd5 33. Rb8+ Kg7 34. Rd8 Kf6 35. Rxd5 Ke6 36. Rb5 Nd6 37. Ra5 Nf5 38. Ra6+ Ke5 39. Ra5+ Ke6 40. Ra6+ Ke5 41. Ra5+ 1/2-1/2

[Event “5th M-Tel Masters round_8”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2009.05.??”]
[Round “8.3”]
[White “Dominguez Perez, Leinier”]
[Black “Topalov, Veselin”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B81”]
[WhiteElo “2721”]
[BlackElo “2812”]
[PlyCount “86”]
[EventDate “2009.05.13”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “10”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]
[EventCategory “21”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 e6 7. g4 Be7 8. Bg2
Nfd7 9. Be3 Nc6 10. Qd2 Nde5 11. b3 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 O-O 13. O-O-O b5 14. Ne2 Bb7 15. f4 Ng6 16. Rhf1 e5 17. Be3 exf4 18. Nxf4 Ne5 19. Kb1 Rc8 20. Nd5 Bxd5 21.exd5 Bh4 22. g5 Re8 23. Bf3 g6 24. Bg4 Rc7 25. Bb6 Qb8 26. Bxc7 Qxc7 27. Be2 Qd8 28. Rg1 Qb6 29. Qf4 Bf2 30. Rg2 Be3 31. Qe4 Re7 32. Qb4 Rc7 33. h4 Bc5 34.Qe4 Qa5 35. Rg3 Bf2 36. Rh3 h5 37. gxh6 f5 38. Qf4 Rxc2 39. Kxc2 Qxa2+ 40. Kc1 Qa1+ 41. Kc2 Qa2+ 42. Kc1 Qa1+ 43. Kc2 Qa2+ 1/2-1/2

Ivanchuk Carlsen

Ivanchuk and Carlsen after round 8

rankings after round 8

Standings after round 8

Results: Round 9

Round 9 Topalov vs Ivanchuk move 21

Round 9 Topalov vs Ivanchuk move 21 – 1-0

Round 9 Carlsen vs Wang end position

Round 9 Carlsen vs Wang end position – 1-0

Round 9 Dominguez vs Shirov end position

Round 9 Dominguez vs Shirov – 1/2

Players round 9

Players at MTel round 9

Round 10 Ivanchuk vs Dominguez final position

Final round: Ivanchuk vs Dominguez final position 1-0

Round 10 Shirov vs Carlsen final position

Final round: Shirov vs Carlsen final position 1-0

Round 10 Wang vs Topalov final position

Final round: Wang vs Topalov final position 1/2

MTel final rankings 2009

MTel Masters 2009: Final rankings

Shirov and Carlsen

Carlsen and Shirov

Shirov

Shirov, winner of MTel Masters 2009

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Anand is Officially the winner of the WCC 2008!

 

Images: Official site

Kramnik and Anand draw colours…

Annotated Videos of Anand and Kramnik ‘s games can be played through on this link, it is on my blog (the “movies” page) and the link will open in a new window. You can also click on that page (top of my blog)

Game 1…Kramnik and Anand…

Image: Official site…Anand vs Kramnik

The World Chess Championships 2008 has started! Anand vs Kramnik! The two Chess Engines of the World!

1. Please click HERE to play through their 2008 World Chess Championships games on chessgames. The link will open in a new window.
2. Please click
HERE if you want to read more about the two players, play through more games or if you want some games in algebraic notation. The link will open in a new window.

3. Please click HERE if you want to play through previous games of Anand and Kramnik on the Official site. The link will open in a new window.

4. On The Official site you can follow the games LIVE. The link will open in a new window. If you click on the top image/logo in this post, it will take you to the Official site’s homepage. The link will open in a new window.
5. If you click HERE you can view a list of games played by Anand/Kramik..it’s a Wiki-link and it will open in a new window. Find similar links in the second link of this post where you can also find some games in algebraic notation.

Games start 2pm for UK local time, 9 am Eastern USA time

Standings: After Game 9
Results of the games between Anand and Kramnik
Game 1 Kramnik vs Anand…1/2

Game 2 Anand vs Kramnik…1/2

Game 3 Kramnik vs Anand…0-1

Game 4 Anand vs Kramnik…1/2

Game 5 Kramnik vs Anand…0-1

Game 6 Anand vs Kramnik…1-0

Game 7 Anand vs Kramnik… 1/2

Game 8 Kramnik vs Anand … 1/2

Game 9 Anand vs Kramnik … 1/2

Game 10 Kramnik vs Anand..1-0

Game 11 Anand vs Kramnik.. 1/2

Kramnik vs Anand…game 1…opening

Kramnik vs Anand…game 1 move 11

Kramnik vs Anand…game 1 move 21

Kramnik vs Anand…game 1 end position

Game 1 move list

GAME/Round 2…Anand vs Kramnik….

Game 2 15th October 2008…move 11

Anand vs Kramnik ….Game 2 move 17

Anand vs Kramnik game 2 move 24

Anand vs Kramnik game 2 Final position…1/2


Kramnik vs Anand..Game 3 move 7


Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 move 14

Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 move 20

Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 move 25

Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 move 30

Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 move 33

Kramnik vs Anand…Game 3 end position 0-1

Game 3 move list

Anand vs Kramnik…Game 4 move 7

Anand vs Kramnik…Game 4 move 12

Anand vs Kramnik… Game 4 move 19

Anand vs Kramnik…Game 4 move 24

Anand vs Kramnik…Game 4 endposition

Game 4 move list

Kramnik vs Anand…game 5 move 7

Kramnik vs Anand…game 5 move 14

Kramnik vs Anand…game 5 move 21

Kramnik vs Anand…game 5 end position

Game 5 move list

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 7

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 14

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 20

 

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 27

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 34

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 move 39

Anand vs Kramnik game 6 final position

Game 6 move list

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 move 7

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 move 13

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 move 19

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 move 25
 

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 move 31

Anand vs Kramnik Game 7 end position

 
Game 7 move list

Kramnik vs Anand game 8 move 7

Kramnik vs Anand Game 8 move 14

Kramnik vs Anand Game 8 move 21

Kramnik vs Anand Game 8 move 28

Kramnik vs Anand Game 8 move 36

Kramnik vs Anand Game 8 final position

Game 8 move list

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 7

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 14

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 19

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 27

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 32

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 move 41

Anand vs Kramnik Game 9 end position

Game 9 move list

Kramnik vs Anand Game 10 move 7

Kramnik vs Anand Game 10 move 18

Kramnik vs Anand Game 10 move 23

Kramnik vs Anand Game 10 Final position

 
Game 10 move list

Anand vs Kramnik Game 11 move 7

Anand vs Kramnik Game 11 move 13

Anand vs Kramnik Game 11 end position

Anand vs Kramnik Game 11 move list

On this link of Chessgames you can play through Kramnik and Anand’s games where they played one another before. On link 1 in this post you can play through the current games of the championships in Bonn.  A new window will open when you click on the link!



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Please click HERE to play through the games of round 9. The games will open in a new separate window as all other links in this post too.

All images and info: from the Official site where you can also follow the games live!
On this link you can follow the the results of all the rounds.
On THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 1 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 2…and click here for round 3 all rounds’ games on chess.com’s site.

Topalov…winner of the Final Chess Masters

Final score…Click on the image for a larger view…source: Chessbase

Round 10…the final round

Pairings and results round 10 Saturday 13th September 2008–the final!

TOPALOV Veselin vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1-0  
CARLSEN Magnus vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2 
ARONIAN Levon vs RADJABOV Teimour–0-1

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 11

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 22

Carlsen vs Anand round 10 final position

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 11

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 21

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 32

Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 42..move 43: Re6 end position

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 11

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 22

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 33

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 42

Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 final position

Standings after round 9

round 9

Pairings and results: round 9 Friday 12th September 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2
RADJABOV Teimour vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
ANAND Viswanathan vs TOPALOV Veselin–1/2

Bilbao round 9 Anand vs Topalov move 10

Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 24

Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 34

Anand vs Topalov round 9 final position

Bilbao round 9 Radjabov vs Carlsen move 7

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 17

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 36

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 49

Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 final position

Bilbao round 9 Ivanchuk vs Aronian move 11

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 24

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 42

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 51, please ignore the 1/2

Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 final position

 

Standings after round 8 click on image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 8 Wednesday 10th September 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs RADJABOV Teimour–1-0  
ANAND Viswanathan vs ARONIAN Levon –1-0
TOPALOV Veselin vs CARLSEN Magnus–1-0


Round 8..Carlsen left…Topalov

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 11

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 16

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 21

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 26

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 34

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 42

Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 end position



Round 8..Radjabov …Ivanchuk

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 6

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 13

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 20

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 44

Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 end position

Round 8..Anand left…Aronian

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 13

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 20

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 27

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 39

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 49

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 58

Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 66

Anand vs Aronian round 8 end position

Standings as 9 Sept – from the Official site…click on image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 7 Tuesday 9th September 2008

CARLSEN Magnus vs IVANCHUK Vassily –0-1
ARONIAN Levon vs TOPALOV Veselin–1-0  
RADJABOV Teimour vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2

Please click HERE to play through the games of round 7 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 6.

Standings…after 6 games…from the Official site..click for larger view

Pairings and results: round 6 Monday 8th September

IVANCHUK Vassily vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
TOPALOV Veselin vs RADJABOV Teimour –1/2
CARLSEN Magnus vs ARONIAN Levon–1-0


Round 6

Pairings and results: round 5: 6th Sept 2008

IVANCHUK Vassily vs TOPALOV Veselin –1/2
ANAND Viswanathan vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
RADJABOV Teimour vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2

Standings after round 4
Please click HERE to play through the games of round 4.

Results: round 4 – 5th Sept 2008

ARONIAN Levon IVANCHUK Vassily –1-0
CARLSEN Magnus RADJABOV Teimour–1-0
TOPALOV Veselin ANAND Viswanathan–1-0

Image: chess.com
The organisers are certainly making original efforts to make chess more accessible to spectators by placing the players in an “Aquarium” i.e. a giant, soundproofed glass box. This innovation was first seen earlier this year at the M-Tel Tournament, but in Bilbao the “Aquarium” will be situated outside in The Plaza Nueva in Bilbao.


Round 1

Round 3…Carlsen vs Topalov..image:chess.com

Round 5 …6th Sept

Bilbao will receive from September 2 to September 13, the strongest tournament of the History of the Chess. A tournament of the category XXII with Elo’s average of the participants of 2775,63. Further more, for the first time ever an event of such characteristics will take place in the street, in the Plaza Nueva, right in the centre of Bilbao’s Old Town.
The six players participating are currently among the world’s top ten chess players headed by world’s champion and number one Viswanathan Anand. Along with him, Magnus Carlsen (number two), Vasili Ivanchuk (number three), Véselin Topálov (number six), Teimur Radyábov (number seven) and Levon Aronián (world’s number ten currently) will compete in Bilbao. No tournament had managed so far to gather such a high Elo’s average level (scoring system to order players’ ranking).

For the first time in a world’s elite tournament and surrounded by a strong international controversy, the Final Masters is going to apply the football scoring system, earning three points per game won and one point per draw, though players will not be allowed to agree a draw being the competition’s referee who will determine it.

The Final Masters has the official recognition of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and it will be played in a double round league during ten days (plus a two-day break). The total prize money amounts to €400,000, sum only exceeded by World Chess Championships: €150,000 for the first classified, €70,000 for the second one, €60,000 for the third one, €50,000 for the fourth one, €40,000 for the fifth one and €30,000 for the sixth one.

Another great novelty in this tournament will be the playing place: the street, allowing a lot of people to follow the games live and directly. A huge soundproofed and air-conditioned glazed case is under construction to this purpose and it will be placed in the Plaza Nueva in Bilbao under a marquee which will also accommodate The Agora for analysis and comments, a space located by the glass case where the audience will also be able to enjoy comments from Chess Grandmasters among whom we can name Boris Spassky and Susan Polgar.

Pleae click HERE for the Official site.

Standings after round 3..click on the image for a larger view

Pairings and results: round 3 — 4th Sept 2008
RADJABOV Teimour vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1/2
ARONIAN Levon vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
CARLSEN Magnus vs TOPALOV Veselin–0-1

Rounds 3-10…Pairings…source:chessbase

Anand
I couldn’t care less about my mental power or whatever it is said about me in the chess encyclopaedias in a hundred years time”. Viswanathan Anand is no doubt one of the greatest genius in chess history in the last fifteen centuries. But his easy-going character makes him the complete opposite of Fischer, Kárpov and Kaspárov. World champion and number one at the age of 38, he lives in Collado Mediano (Madrid), the rapid of Madras wants to polish even more his record in Bilbao at a month from the struggle for the crown with Russian Vladímir Krámnik.

“Although it is my second world title, this one is more valuable because in 2000 chess was suffering from a schism and there were two champions. Now I am the only one. The dream has come true” he explained in Mexico City on 1st October 2007, before calling his parents who live in Chennai (former Madras) and his “Spanish father”, Mauricio Perea.


Carlsen

The ‘Mozart of Chess’

His second places at the Wijk aan Zee Corus (Holland) 2008 and at the Ciudad de Linares 2008, where he repeated his 2007 achievement, are a sign that this 17 years old Norwegian is already mature for even greater achievements. Magnus Carlsen recommends parents of child prodigies: “to give them support but without putting pressure on them. My father taught me to play chess when I was 5, but I wasn’t interested at the time and he left me alone”. At the age of 2 he already solved difficult jigsaws; at 5 he remembered the capitals, flags, areas and inhabitants of every country.

At 8, Magnus felt jealous one of his sisters played chess and that is where a career only comparable in precociousness with the ones of the sacred manes began. At 13 Carlsen became the youngest chess grandmaster in the world; and today, at the age of 17, he is among the world’s top five players in the rankings. He sleeps up to eleven hours, is a passionate fan of the Real Madrid and Spain is the country he knows best. When he is not travelling he attends a special school for sports talents. He has his particular opinion about money: “I don’t really know what to do with it”. I spend much less than I earn”.


Ivanchuk
An adorable absent-minded wise man

His sensational victory in the Mtel Masters, Sofia 2008 gave him the right to be in the Bilbao Final Masters. But even without this feat, Vassili Ivanchuk deserves a place among the top-class chess players: at almost 40, he is the oldest luminary though he is nevertheless at the peak of his career. Chess lover to the core, tireless worker of encyclopaedic knowledge he is a genius absent-minded wise man of whom everybody – even his most bitter rivals- speaks very fondly.

“My secret is I don’t know how I managed to win those five first games one after the other. I certainly did have a little bit of what it is called the luck of the champions. But the key is I wasn’t aware of what I was achieving; otherwise I would have never managed to do it. I believe I am at the best of my career. I don’t feel a bit old to stay in the elite; particularly if I compare myself to Víktor Korchnói, who is at his 77 years old still in the front line!”. So modestly explained Ivanchuk his win in Sofia –undefeated, with eight of ten possible points-, one of the best results in chess history.


Topalov
An exemplary fighter on his way up

He defeated Kasparov in what was to be his last game (Linares 2005) and he is a clear symbol of the differences between the current chess elite and the times of the Ogre of Baku.Natural, modest and very friendly, a fighter and well disciplined about his everyday training, and tries to keep a good image. That’s Veselin Topalov, the 33 year-old Bulgarian from Salamanca world chess champion in 2005 and currently number four in the chess rankings, with the clear aim to take up again the crown in 2009.

“I will never forget what happened to me when I was 8 years old in Ruse, my native city. After defeating me, one of the best players of the area gave me a row, he pulled my ears and almost hit me because I had played too fast, without thinking. A year later I played with him again in the same tournament, and I won, he remembers about his childhood in Bulgaria.

Topalov admits that it is impossible to be among the world’s top ten chess players without innate talents: “If we put it into round numbers, 60% of my success is due to the effort and 40% to the talent”.

Radjabov
The kid that knocked out Kasparov

Even though chess is along with music and mathematics the activity that more child prodigies produces, very few have impressed so much as Teimur Radyabov. At 12, when he became European Champion U-18, he already showed a strategic depth and good manners not expected from someone of his age. At 14 he became grandmaster. At 15 he defeated Kasparov with the black pieces in Linares. Today he is 21 and has settled among the elite, though everything shows that he’s still got a long way to go, as he will most probably demonstrate in Bilbao.

One has to go back as far as the legendary Bobby Fischer in the 60’s to find feats as resounding as when Radyabov defeated Kasparov in 2003. Also born in Baku, he had never lost with white pieces to a human rival in the classical game since May 1996. Bearing in mind that both of them were born in Baku and were Guéidar Alíyev’s protégées (President of the Azerbaijan KGB when Kasparov was young and of the Azerbaijani Government when Radyábov was a child) one can better understand Kaspárov’s angry outburst that night: he did not shake hands with the winner and had a very late dinner, thumping his fist on the table while having chicken.

Aronian

An easy-going winner

He could be the boy from the shop around the corner, jet he is a great chess luminary: he is only 25 years old but has already won the World Cup and the Linares and Wijk aan Zee (twice) tournaments. That naturalness, his universal style and belonging to a country where chess is the national passion, as well as a balanced nervous system configure the 25 year-old Armenian Levon Aronian as a very solid value.

“I’m not prepared to compete with the big ones. The only advantage I have over those beasts is my total ignorance and fresh thinking”, Aronian said at Christmas 2005, a few days after having won the World Cup in Siberia and some days just before his debut in the Wijk aan Zee Corus Tournament (Holland), where he shared the 7th place of 14 participantespants. Just a month later he triumphed in Linares, the chess Wimbledon, so surprisingly as convincingly.

Images from different rounds from the Official site.

About.com…classic chess…64 great chess games ever played…follow this link

http://chess.about.com/library/pal4/zbstches/blzbstix.htm

LIVE ratings!

http://chess.liverating.org/



Round 6

Image: zeenews.com
Fifth draw for Anand in Chess Grand Slam
Bilbao, Sept 09: India’s Viswanathan Anand continued to search for his first win of the Chess Grand Slam Final being staged here, as he played yet another draw in the sixth round.

The world champion, who is back by Tech giant NIIT, Monday drew with Vassily Ivanchuk in 32 moves and took his total to 2.5 points on the traditional points system.

But here in Bilbao with draws fetching one point and wins three, Anand has five, while the leader is young Magnus Carlsen with 11 points from three wins and two draws and one loss.

The Ivanchuk-Anand game was a staid draw coming out from a Slav Defence, with Ivanchuk making a token effort to gain advantage and Anand thwarting this effectively for a 32-move draw.

Anand’s game has been somewhat subdued leading to the feeling that the world champion is not revealing any of his major preparations that he may have made for the world title match against Vladimir Kramnik next month.

Veselin Topalov, who beat Anand in the fifth round, and has 10 points with two wins and four draws, follows Carlsen. Lev Aronian, the only player with two losses, is third with six points, and Anand, Teimour Radjabov and Ivanchuk have five points each.

The tournament is a six-player double round robin event, one of the strongest in the history of the game.

The scoring system in this tournament is different and experimental. Players get three points for a win, one point for a draw and zero points for losing a game. For rating purposes the traditional 1-½-0 system will be used.

The prize fund for the event is 400,000 Euros, with the winner receiving 150,000 Euros, the second place 70,000 Euros, and so on, with the sixth player getting 30,000 Euros. The sums are unprecedented for an event like this. Only world championships have exceeded the amount.

The Topalov-Radjabov clash was more volatile, with the Bulgarian GM looking set to chalk up another victory in Bilbao. But after massive trade-offs after the time control Black had solved all his problems and in fact undertook some tentative attempts to play for a win. The draw came with a repetition at move 73.

Carlsen continued his great run with a solid win over Aronian. He sacrificed a pawn, which was part of theory, but then young Carlsen played a novelty which involves a second sacrifice on move 15. It loosely resembled the Gelfand-Kramnik game in Mexico City 2007, but that ended in a draw.

The novelty led to Carlsen forcing Aronian’s king to be stuck in the middle. Carlsen got one pawn back and then launched a blistering attack. He wrapped up the game in 32 moves.

In the seventh round, Anand will have black pieces against Radjabov, while Carlsen clashes with Ivanchuk and Aronian meets Topalov.

Scores after six rounds: Carlsen (11 points); 2. Topalov (10 points); Aronian (6 points); Anand, Radjabov and Ivanchuk (5 points each).

IANS
Source: http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=467774&sid=SPO&ssid=93


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readysteadygo

ready

I was tagged by Wipneus to write about my “slogan” in life…well, firstly I want to apologise, as this entry will be in Afrikaans…basically, I’m saying that I’m a “ready-steady-go”-person…as you can see from this picture…and that I believe to do what is expected from you, when it’s expected and also, try to do more than what’s expected and….to use my logical mind!/use your brain!! …and…be positive and see an opportunity in every problem! I don’t have patience with myself and in general, I want to get things done! So,  if you’re a bit too slow for me, I’ll do your work too just to get the job done. I can’t hang around doing nothing and would use my logical mind to do what needs to be done.

Personally, I  think Chess is the game to develop the logical mind!! Slide down to the bottom of this post to read about the logical mind…and read about Susan Polgar and her brilliant brain. Everybody has a brilliant brain, it depends on how you use it! I’ve said to so many children that there is no such thing as a dumb child…each child learns in a different way and the same with adults. You use your brain in a different way and some people don’t use it at all… it’s not that they are dumb..they have to learn how to use it..  And now…tagging time…(you can find them all on my blogroll) Ray (bookstoysgames)…Norrbu….Tony…and Luigi!

Vir iemand om saam met my te werk, moet dit seker een groot vet fees wees…Ek weet presies wat ek wil doen, hoe ek dit gedoen wil hê en wanneer ek dit wil doen. Ek raak gou besig met ander mense se “opdragte” as hulle nie gou genoeg ‘n ding doen nie… en gelukkig waardeer hulle dit wanneer ek dit doen. Ek geniet dit ook om meer as net te doen wat van my verwag word…nie omdat ek wil iewers wil “inkruip”  nie, maar net bloot omdat dit in my natuur is om raak te sien wat gedoen moet word en om my logiese verstand te gebruik wanneer dit kom by dinge wat gedoen moet word. Sommige mense sien sekere take as benede hulle posisie en ander sal wil hê hulle moet eers gevra word om ‘n ding te doen – dalk dink hulle hulle word meer belangrik geag as hulle eers gevra word, maar in my oë sien ek dit eerder as ‘n geval van nie jou logiese denke inspan nie!  Ek vra myself die vraag…waarom nie doen wat gedoen moet word, jy spaar energie/tyd, want sekere opdragte hou verband met ander en daarom gaan alles soveel vinniger as opdrag 1 uit die pad is en opdrag 2 kan voortgaan…ek vra myself ook soms, “dink mense nie vir hulself nie”? ek verkies om kinders in die laerskool te leer hoe om vir hulself te dink, hoe om verstandig te dink en net deur logika te gebruik, spaar dit almal baie pyne en deur in ‘n span te werk, maak jy dit vir almal ligter en almal is soveel gelukkiger! Jy ontwikkel jouself as mens en skep geleenthede vir jouself in in die proses  dalk vir ander ook! Dit is nou waar “sien ‘n geleentheid in elke probleem” inkom! — en om eerlik te wees…(jammer vir die nie-skaakspelers…dis geen aanklag teen jul intelligensie nie!!)…skaak is ‘n spel wat jou beslis logika leer!

Met myself is ek baie ongeduldig… ek moet aan die gang bly en kan nie sit en niks doen nie, my familie – gesin – weet gewoonlik dat hulle met my altyd “gereed” moet wees… wanneer daar iewers heen gegaan moet word, is dit gewoonlik algemeen aanvaar dat almal gereed is wanneer hulle gereed moet wees…sjoe! Dit klink verskriklik…maar dis nie so erg nie! 😉 Wanneer ek skoolhou is dit deel van my algemene omgang met die kinders…”are you ready?” in Suid-Afrika was dit gewoonlik ‘n koor wat antwoord…”Ja…steady….” julle ken seker almal die “are you ready” van die Gladiators..wel, dis nou ekke…hoor dit in jou gedagtes en jy hoor vir my! lol….hier in London…sal daardie selfde koor kom met…”no!! wait!!”…hierdie Engelse is te stadig na my sin…… 😉
 Read and enjoy this article about the logical mind…Don’t be held back..it says…
 
 We are blessed to have such powerful minds to put to work for us. Unfortunately, our minds tend to end up getting a much bigger role than they should. This can cause us to be held to the same old comfortable reality, which I imagine, you would probably like to see improvements in!

Our logical mind has a definite purpose, it can figure things out, it can plan, it can analyze, figure out how to make things work, figure out how to implement a plan. These are all wonderful things that help us in our day to day life.

But the logical mind is just that, logical. It does what “makes sense”.

And just what makes sense to the logical mind? What has worked in the past. What it has seen work for others.

Hmm, let’s see, so if you are making decisions and living your life with your logical mind in charge, what could the future possibly look like?

Same as the past!!!

And is that what you want? I’m guessing no. We are always growing and expanding and with that comes the desire for more. That is a natural part of this life and it is a good thing.

So how can you prevent your logical mind from holding you back like this?

It helps to see it from a bigger perspective. You see, if the mind had the perspective of the soul it would have a much bigger picture of your life and of what is possible. It would not look to the past to see what to do. It would see the potential and move forward.

But the logical mind does not see this big picture. It only sees what is and what has been.

So if you are wanting to take your life to a new level, to break into wonderful new territory do you really want to be putting your logical mind in charge?

I don’t think so.

So how do you deal with this? Who is in charge then?

You.

You are not your mind. Your mind is a tool you have available to you.

And you have the ability to access higher information through your intuition. You can receive guidance from a higher part of yourself that sees the big picture.

It is up to you to choose how you make decisions in your life. From the logical mind, or maybe based on a higher knowing. You choose.

That is why your intuition is an important part of this journey to your even better life. It is your access to the big picture. And you may never get to see that bigger picture and that doesn’t matter. You just need the insight from the part of you that does see it.
Please click
HERE to read the entire article.

Read about Susan Polgar, Woman Grandmaster in Chess…American…what she says…you can read her blog..it’s on my blog roll in the “Chess” section.

My Brilliant Brain –  
Exploring the incredible inner workings of the human brain, this compelling three-part documentary series looks at a group of remarkable people and poses questions about the origins of genius: are these extraordinary abilities genetic, developed or acquired by accident? This episode focuses on Susan Polgar, the first female chess grandmaster, whose incredible story suggests that genius does not always have to be innate, but can be taught.

At 38 years old, Susan Polgar has reached heights that few women have ever equalled in the chess world. Despite the common assumption that men’s brains are better at understanding spatial relationships, giving them an advantage in games such as chess, Susan went on to become the world’s first grandmaster. Susan’s remarkable abilities have earned her the label of ‘genius’, but her psychologist father, László Polgar, believed that genius was “not born, but made”. Noting that even Mozart received tutelage from his father at a very early age, Polgar set about teaching chess to the five-year-old Susan after she happened upon a chess set in their home. “My father believed that the potential of children was not used optimally,” says Susan.

Throughout the rest of her childhood, Susan practised for hours, memorising thousands of moves and scenarios, and devouring books and stratagems. She took on the men in her local chess club at the age of five and began beating them. By the age of 15, she was the best female player in the world. A year later in 1985, she sensationally vanquished a male grandmaster for the first time. But Susan is not the only family member to achieve such incredible success – her younger sisters Judit and Zsófia are grandmaster and international master respectively, thanks to similar schooling from their father.

So how has Susan trained her brain to such a formidable degree? Chess is so complex a game that there are four billion choices for the first three moves alone. Susan has committed to memory tens of thousands of possible patterns and scenarios. Every time Susan sees a grouping of chess pieces on a board, she can browse through her back catalogue of memorised groupings, using instinct to tell her the right move. “We seem to heap a lot of praise on people’s calculating ability,” says former British champion William Hartston, “but we take for granted all sorts of mental abilities that are absolutely intuitive.”

Susan displays her skills as she takes on a friend at ‘Blitz’ – a form of chess in which players must complete their moves in just one minute. Susan uses her razor-sharp instinct to not only move her own pieces, but guess her opponent’s moves in milliseconds. “I have to trust my instincts, my recognition,” she explains. “It’s almost like guessing, but basing it on prior games and experience.”

In order to isolate the areas of her brain she uses when playing chess, Susan is given an MRI scan. There is an area at the front of the brain which deals with face recognition, allowing most people to remember a face in 100 milliseconds. Astonishingly, this is the very place where the experts find that Susan has moulded her recognition of 100,000 chess scenarios. Over years of childhood practice, Susan has hardwired these countless scenarios into her long-term memory and can recognise one in an instant – as quickly as someone might recognise the face of a friend or relative.

It is this lightning-quick instinct, coupled with a phenomenal memory and years of relentless practice, that have earned Susan the status of ‘genius’. Her story presents strong evidence to suggest that her father was right – genius may indeed be nurture over nature. “I really believe that if you put your mind to it,” reflects Susan, “you can achieve it, whatever it is”.
Article to be found
HERE about Susan Polgar…”My brilliant brain”…


Image:www.sv-goerlitz.de/Foren/Gallery/images
On THIS LINK you can watch a long-ish video about Susan and her brilliant brain. It is a video longer than 40 minutes and worth to watch. She wasn’t born with this brilliant brain, it was created….

Watch this movie about Susan Polgar and her “brilliant brain”.

As a space-lover..I couldn’t resist this picture! of the day…as it immediately reminded me about our brains…almost the shape too!

Image: http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/
 

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Congratulations Levon Aronian, Winner of the Asrian Memorial, 2008.

1st place: Levon Aronian 8.5 points
2nd place: Peter Leko 8 points
3rd place: Alexander Morozevich 7.5 points
4th place: Boris Gelfand 7.5 points

Live games link HERE
For the results on the tournament, follow the link to the official site or on the second link where you can play through their games too.

Chess Giants Yerevan 2008″ rapid chess tournament which will be held in Yerevan, Armenia from June 8-15, 2008. Eight giants of the chess world will pair off and play two games a day in what promises to be a week of fighting chess. You can follow the games every day at 18:00 PM local time (GMT+4) from Yerevan’s picturesque Opera House. Please click HERE for the Official site of Chess Giants.
On THIS LINK you can play through their games as the tournament goes…enjoy!

Standings after 10 rounds

1. Leko, Peter HUN 2741 6½
2. Aronian, Levon ARM 2763 6
3. Sargissian, Gabriel ARM 2643 5½
4-5. Bu Xiangzhi CHN 2708 5
4-5. Gelfand, Boris ISR 2723 5
6. Morozevich, Alexander RUS 2774 4½
7. Adams, Michael ENG 2729 4
8. Akopian, Vladimir ARM 2673 3½

Aronian and Morozevich

 

Morozevich and Adams

Alexander Morozevich – RUS 2774

Levon Aronian – ARM 2763

Peter Leko – HUN 2741

 

Michael Adams – ENG 2729

 

Boris Gelfand – ISR 2723

 

Gabriel Sargissian – ARM 2643

Vladimir Akopian – ARM 2673

Bu Xiangzhi – CHN 2708

 Round 1
1 Sargissian 1/2 Adams
2 Morozevich 1-0 Gelfand
3 Bu 1/2 Leko
4 Aronian 1/2 Akopian

Round 2
1 Adams 1/2 Sargissian
2 Gelfand 1/2 Morozevich
3 Leko 1-0 Bu
4 Akopian 1/2 Aronian

Note that due to the tragic news of GM Karen Asrian’s passing, the games scheduled for June 10 and June 11 have been postponed. The Chess Giants tournament will resume on June 12. Click HERE  to read about his death.

According to the decision of the Armenian Chess Federation, the Chess Giants Yerevan 2008 tournament has been renamed the Karen Asrian Memorial and will be held traditionally in honor of our cherished champion.

In addition, the rapid open scheduled to have been played in parallel to the main tournament from June 12-15, has been cancelled.

 It is with great sadness and difficulty we report to you that today, June 9, Armenian Grandmaster Karen Asrian passed away. He was 28 years old. Details will be forthcoming. Round 1 games started late after a moment of silence in GM Asrian’s memory.

Yerevan, Armenia, the Opera House is the round building on the left…and this is where this tournament takes place. Image: Britanica

 

Image: http://www.ecml.at/html/armenian/images/yerevan

In the valley of Biblical Mount Ararat lies the beautiful ancient city of Yerevan, the 12th capital of Armenia. Yerevan was built around the city-fortress of Erebuni established by the King Argishti the First the king of Urartu in the year 782 BC.The ruins of Erebuni still stand in the southeastern part of the city.

A large part of the Erebuni fortification had been reconstructed by 1968 when the city celebrated the 2750th anniversary of its foundation. The well-preserved walls permitted the complete reproduction of the layout of Erebuni.

Yerevan is situated in the north-eastern part of the Ararat Valley. Mounts Aragats, Azhdaak, and Ararat can be seen from the city. With its rugged terrain, Yerevan displays a 400m disparity between its lowest and highest points. The city is divided by Hrazdan River that flows in a picturesque canyon.

The climate in Yerevan is dry and sharply varied with temperatures in summer peaking over 35 C and falling below -15 C in winter.

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alexandra2

alexandra-kosteniuk

Click on the images for a larger view.

alexandra-kosteniuk1

alexandrakosteniuk

alexandra-kosteniuk

alexandra-kosteniuk3

alexandra-k

Please click HERE to play through chess games of Alexandra. The link will open in a new window.

10 January 2009: News article about Alexandra…the link will open in a new window.

http://www.miamiherald.com/277/story/847451.html

On this link on my blog, http://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/09/12/alexandra-kosteniuk-winner-of-nalchik/ you can follow the games played in the  World Women’s Chess Championships in  between Kosteniuk and Yifan. There’s also more pictures of her to see.

Alexandra Kosteniuk is one of the beauties in the world of Chess! In this video you can see the game she played against GM Zoltan Almasi. It’s a blitz. Fast chess, also known as, blitz chess, lightning chess, bullet chess and rapid chess, is a type of chess game in which each side is given less time to make their moves than under the normal tournament time controls of 60-150 minutes (1-2½ hours) per player.
Read HERE more about blitz chess.

Please click HERE for the official site of Alexandra Kosteniuk.

Alexandra Kosteniuk comments in detail her blitz game played in Moscow at the World Blitz Championships Qualifiers against one of the world’s top experts on the Berlin Wall defence.
 

Image…NYtimes

The model Carmen Kass in a five-minute blitz match against Viswanathan Anand in 2004.

Image:chessbase


Read the review of this book here at the link at the bottom of this post….or click on the image to order the book.

Many of us, even those of us who don’t play either well or often, are familiar with chess. Some of us will be aware that some pieces are differently represented in different parts of the world, but I wonder how many of us are aware of the comparatively recent introduction of the queen?

Marilyn Yalom attempts three objectives in this interesting book. Firstly, and of most interest to me, she outlines a history of the game of chess and its likely spread across the world. Secondly, Dr Yalom explains the development of the piece currently known as the queen in most European chess play both in terms of its replacement of earlier pieces, and its emerging power. Finally, Dr Yalom makes a case for parallels between the emergence of the power of the chess queen and the rise of powerful female sovereigns in Europe.

While I am attracted to the notion of the role of the chess queen as a reflection of the rise of strong queens (such as Isabella of Castile), and a possible association with the cult of the Virgin Mary, this is of peripheral interest to me. What I did find fascinating was the history of the development of the game, especially the differences between cultures and countries. Dr Yalom advises that the chess queen did not appear on the board until about 1000: some 200 years after the game had been introduced to southern Europe. Yet, by 1497, the queen had developed from a weak piece (moving one square at a time on the diagonal) to the more formidable force that she is today.

Dr Yalom presents a wealth of information in this book. Whether you share her conclusions, her enthusiasm for the subject combined with her capacity to present a variety of interesting data in a readable and accessible way will make this an enjoyable read.

Those who are serious chess players may find some of the facts interesting. Those of us interested in the evolution of institutions of power and who choose to explore parallels between games of strategy and political realities should also enjoy this book.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060090650/ref=cm_rdp_product

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Results round 5: Please click HERE to play through the games of round 5….and it seems to me that…Ivanchuk is on his way to fame!
The results in round 5:

Veselin Topalov 1-0 Bu Xiangzhi
Levon Aronian 0-1 Vassily Ivanchuk
Ivan Cheparinov ½-½ Teimour Radjabov

Click on THIS LINK to play through a few games from the first 3 rounds and also, see 2 videos of Ivanchuck’s games in rounds 4 and 5….

 Results of rounds 2-4

Please click HERE to play through the games of round 2 and to see the standings after round 2! The games take a few seconds to load.
If you click HERE you can view the games of round 3 and the standings after round 3…the games take a few seconds to load…

Results of round 4:
On
THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 4 and see the results.

The positions after round 4:
Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR 2740 4
Topalov, Veselin BUL 2767
Radjabov, Teimour AZE 2751
Aronian, Levon ARM 2763
Cheparinov, Ivan BUL 2696
Bu Xiangzhi CHN 2708 1

 
Please click HERE for the MTEL site and live games…on the side bar of my blog you will find the MTEL-link to live links too.
The M-Tel Masters tournament will take place between the 8th and the 18th May in Sofia, Bulgaria. The competitors in this ultra-strong double round-robin tournament are:

Veselin Topalov Bulgaria ELO 2767
Vassily Ivanchuk Ukraine ELO 2740
Levon Aronian Armenia ELO 2763
Teimour Radjabov Azerbaijan ELO 2751
Ivan Cheparinov Bulgaria ELO 2695
Bu Xiangzhi China ELO 2708

This event forms part of the ‘Grand Slam’ circuit which also includes the tournaments at Wijk Aan Zee, Moreila/Linares and Mexico City. The four winners of these tournaments will play against one another in a final tournament in Bilbao in September. Info…chess.com

Schedule

Blindfold: Topalov vs Juett (winner in the game Play like Topalov 2007): May 06, 19.00 EEST (16.00 UTC))
Press conference: May 07, 12.00 EEST (09.00 UTC)
Official opening: May 07, 18.00 EEST (15.00 UTC)
Cocktail party: May 07, 19.00 EEST (16.00 UTC)

Round 1: May 08, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)
Round 2: May 09, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)
Round 3: May 10, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)
Round 4: May 11, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) 
Round 5: May 12, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)

Rest Day: May 13
Football: FC Levski vs Chess United
May 13, 12.00 EEST (09.00 UTC)

Round 6: May 14, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) 
Round 7: May 15, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) 
Round 8: May 16, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) 
Round 9: May 17, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC) 
Round 10: May 18, 15.00 EEST (12.00 UTC)

Tie breaks: 19.00 EEST (16.00 UTC)
Closing ceremony: 20.00 EEST (17.00 UTC)
Cocktail party: 21.00 EEST (18.00 UTC)

 

Image:chessbase

 

 

Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria

Five things to see in Sofia

Bulgaria joined the EU in January and Sofia, its capital, is ready for visitors. It may not be as glamorous as those favorite eastern European capitals, Prague and Budapest, but this city of just over a million, surrounded by snow-covered peaks, is a pleasant surprise.

Start at the statue
Almost everything is in the center of town and can be visited on foot. Start a tour at the statue of St. Sofia, the city’s patron whose golden statue was erected atop a tall pedestal five years ago. The citizens of Sofia are said to love the statue but the church condemns it, contending that it is not a religious rendition of a saint. They may have a point: The golden saint, wearing a form-fitting gown with a plunging neckline, looks more like a Greek goddess.

Roman remains by the rotunda
Head over to the Sheraton hotel, which was built in front of the oldest and best preserved building in Sofia, the 4th-century St. George Rotunda. This ancient church is surrounded by ruins of the Roman town of Serdica. Within the structure, three layers of frescoes were discovered, the oldest dating to the 10th century.
Battenburg Square
Walk through Alexander Battenburg Square, named after the man who became the country’s first prince in 1879 when the country was liberated from 400 years of occupation by the Turks. Pass the National Art Gallery, a yellow building which was the former royal palace, and continue down Tsar Osvoboditel Boulevard past the Russian Church of St. Nicholas. This is Sofia’s prettiest church with a bright yellow-tiled exterior, gilded domes, and an emerald green spire, all sparkling in the sun-a delightful jewel in the midst of the busy city. It was built in 1913 in the traditional Moscow decorative style as the project of a Russian architect.

St. Alexander Nevski
The golden dome of St. Alexander Nevski Cathedral, the city’s largest place of worship, dominates the skyline. Built between 1908 and 1912, it commemorates the 200,000 Russian soldiers who perished in the Bulgarian War of Liberation.

The majority of Bulgarians are Christian Orthodox and their churches are lavishly decorated with frescoes, icons, chandeliers-and candles. Some are dark and mysterious places with just the flickering of candles casting a soft glow on the silver that covers many of the icons. Thanks to large clear windows, St. Alexander Nevski is brighter than most orthodox churches.

Markets
There’s a lively and colorful street market near the church. Everything from Russian fur hats and lacquered boxes to icons, embroidery, and flea market bric-a-brac is for sale. And on Vitosha Boulevard, the city’s main shopping thoroughfare, pedestrians saunter down the middle of the street, which is closed to all traffic except trams, and is as busy as the city’s covered market. In the middle of the market hall, surrounded by shops-bakeries, butchers, vegetable stands, and souvenir boutiques-are a fountain and two popular restaurant/bar complexes.

Source: Internationalliving.com

 

Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. The city was founded around 7 000 years ago in a close proximity to the Vitosha Mountain and has now turned into a real cosmopolitan city. As it is with other capitals, Sofia is the centre of the political, cultural and business life in Bulgaria. The city offers many international events, as well as theatres, operas, concert halls, museums and galleries. The place is also suitable for congresses, symposia, meetings and conferences because its business centre and hotels are very near the centre of the city. For the comfort-lovers there are many luxurious five, four and three-stars hotels. And for those who want comfort, rest and tranquility, there are many small private hotels in Sofia’s surroundings.

Read more: bulgaria-trips.info/Sofia/sofia.html

image:bghouses.com

The Mtel Chess Masters Round 2- Images: Mtel Official site

The Mtel Chess Masters Round 2- Images: Mtel Official site

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Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 move 7

Shirov vs Topalov Round 2 move 7

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 move 7

Ivanchuk vs Wang round 2 move 7

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 move 7

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 move 7

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 end position 1/2

Dominguez vs Carlsen round 2 end position 1/2

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 Only if you follow Baku-Chess…you will know what this is all about…. 😉

 

Icheri Sheher – an old inner city of Baku
Image:Baku2008.Fide.com

See more Baku-photos on THIS LINK …which is also about round 5 and the games that were played.

 

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Today…round 13 – the final round! – was played in Baku, Azerbainjan. The first images in this post is about round 13, please slide down for round 12-results. More images of round 13 can bee seen on the official Baku2008.fide.com-site.

Tadaa! and here are the results of round 13…
Karjakin, Sergey 1/2 Kamsky, Gata 1/2
Svidler, Peter 1 Inarkiev,Ernesto 0
Navara, David 1 Cheparinov, Ivan 0
Adams, Michael 1/2 Gashimov, Vugar 1/2
Grischuk, Alexander 1/2 Radjabov, Teimour 1/2
Carlsen, Magnus 1 Bacrot,Etienne 0
Wang, Yue 1/2 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 1/2
Kamsky, Gata 1/2 Kerjakin, Sergey 1/2

Final ranking…
1 Gashimov Vugar 2679 AZE 8
2 Wang Yue 2689 CHN 8
3 Carlsen Magnus 2765 NOR 8
4 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2752 AZE 71/2
5 Grischuk Alexander 2716 RUS 7½
6 Adams Michael 2729 ENG 6½
7 Svidler Peter 2746 RUS 6½
8 Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 6
9 Kamsky Gata 2726 USA 6
10 Karjakin Sergey 2732 UKR 6
11 Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 5½
12 Navara David 2672 CZE 5½
13 Bacrot Etienne 2705 FRA 5
14 Inarkiev Ernesto 2684 RUS 5


Game between Wang and Mamedyrov…move 29….round 13

This image is from the game between Bacrot and Carlsen…after move 34

Wang against Mamedyarov move…47

End position…Navara and Cheparinov

End position: Grischuk and Radjabov

Results …round 12 played yesterday:

Radjabov 0 Navara 1   
Gashimov 1 Grischuk 0
Kamsky 0 Svidler 1
Carlsen 1 Adams 0
Cheparinov 1/2 Karjakin 1/2
Inarkiev 1/2 Wang 1/2
Mamedyarov 1 Bacrot 0

 

On this image you can see what the game board looked like between Carlsen and Adams in round 12. Click on images for a larger view.


Inarkiev playing white against Wang.

Kamsky playing against Svidler


Final position of the game between Kamsky and Svidler

 
Gashimov against Grischuk…move 17

Gashimov against Grischuk…final position on the board


Radjabov against Navara…move 19


Final position of the board between Radjabov and Navara

Mamedyarov against Bacrot move 49

All images from players: Baku2008-Fide  Official site

…wow…I can’t make up my mind with all of these men…why do  they all look so the same today!

….I was sure there was a fairy…just there!

Gata… I told you he didn’t touch that pawn…it was the pawn on H2…

…but sir…he touched it again! where are you now!….

…if you’re in the top position, this is how you pick up a piece…just watch..and you’ll win!

…..wow…they are sooooooo beautiful!

 

…eeny meeny miny moe!…..


Standings…after round 12
 
Wang Yue 2689 CHN 7½
Gashimov Vugar 2679 AZE 7½
Grischuk Alexander 2716 RUS 7
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2752 AZE 7
Carlsen Magnus 2765 NOR 7
Adams Michael 2729 ENG 6
Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5½
Karjakin Sergey 2732 UKR 5½
Svidler Peter 2746 RUS 5½
Kamsky Gata 2726 USA 5½
Bacrot Etienne 2705 FRA 5
Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 5
Inarkiev Ernesto 2684 RUS 5
Navara David 2672 CZE 4½

 

Pairings for round 13, the final round.
 

Round 13 on 05/05/08 at 14:00  
         
Karjakin Sergey – Kamsky Gata    
Navara David – Cheparinov Ivan  
Grischuk Alexander – Radjabov Teimour  
Adams Michael – Gashimov Vugar  
Bacrot Etienne – Carlsen Magnus  
Yue Wang – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar  
Svidler Peter – Inarkiev Ernesto   

Enjoy the video about round 13, the final round.

ENJOY! this movie about round 12…also to be seen on the Baku2008-Fide site.

On this image you can see the three winners in this tournament.

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Magnus Carlsen  against Alexander Grischuk

Gata Kamsky against Ivan Cheparinov


Peter Svidler against Yue Wang


Gashimov against Navara

Inarkiev against Bacrot

Chess players in Baku, Azerbaijan are now busy playing round 11, follow their games live on the “live” link on my blog. By looking at the images of the players, they all look very serious! On the game-images you can see what the chess boards looked like up to the particular move that can also be seen on the image. Please click on the games-images for a larger view. All other images are from the Official site.

Results of finished games…

Karjakin 1/2 Radjabov1/2

Adams 1/2 Mamedjarov 1/2

Grischuk 1/2 Carlsen 1/2

Cheparinov 1/2 Kamsky 1/2

Inarkiev 1 Bacrot 0

Yue Wang 1 Peter Svidler 0

Vugar Gashimov 1/2 David Navara 1/2

 

On these images you can see players on their way and getting examined by security…seems like Svidler was in a good, relaxing mood  and even smiled friendly at the camera!…..



 

 

This photo has nothing to do with Baku Chess…a photo I want to share…Svidler and Anand… I think Svidler might be my “next” favourite player – I have a few and can’t make up my mind though, but I do enjoy his friendly personality that reflects from many photos. On this photo he’s sharing a “joke” with Anand…wonder if he was trying to advise Anand on how to be the best…if you look at his finger…lol!

Pairings for rounds 12 and 13:

Round 12 on 04/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Kamsky Gata – Svidler Peter    
Inarkiev Ernesto – Yue Wang    
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar – Bacrot Etienne  
Carlsen Magnus – Adams Michael  
Gashimov Vugar – Grischuk Alexander  
Radjabov Teimour – Navara David  
Cheparinov Ivan – Karjakin Sergey  
         
Round 13 on 05/05/08 at 14:00  
         
Karjakin Sergey – Kamsky Gata    
Navara David – Cheparinov Ivan  
Grischuk Alexander – Radjabov Teimour  
Adams Michael – Gashimov Vugar  
Bacrot Etienne – Carlsen Magnus  
Yue Wang – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar  
Svidler Peter – Inarkiev Ernesto   

After round 11:

1 Wang Yue 2689 CHN 7
2 Grischuk Alexander 2716 RUS 7
3 Gashimov Vugar 2679 AZE 6½
4 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2752 AZE 6
5 Carlsen Magnus 2765 NOR 6
6 Adams Michael 2729 ENG 6
7 Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5½
8 Kamsky Gata 2726 USA 5½
9 Bacrot Etienne 2705 FRA 5
10 Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 5
11 Karjakin Sergey 2732 UKR 5
12 Svidler Peter 2746 RUS 4½
13 Inarkiev Ernesto 2684 RUS 4½
14 Navara David 2672 CZE 3½

Enjoy this video-report about round 11 from the Official Fide-Baku site

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In Baku, Azerbaijan, it was a rainy day today….In this image you can see Radjabov sharing his umbrella. In Round 10, Carlsen and Navara drew their game and Grischuck and Mamedyarov.  Ivan Cheparinov-(Bulgaria)  won his game against Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan).
Follow THIS LINK to watch some press conferences about different players.
Other results:
Gata Kamsky 1/2 Wang Yue 1/2
Gashimov Vugar 1/2 Karjakin Sergey 1/2
Inarkiev Ernesto 1/2 Michael Adams 1/2
Svidler Peter 1/2 Bacrot Etienne 1/2

Follow the “live” link on the side bar of my blog to follow the games live.
Please follow
THIS LINK to see more photos taken today in round 10.

…..is that an expression of a blunder?

 

Round 11 on 03/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Cheparinov Ivan – Kamsky Gata  
Karjakin Sergey – Radjabov Teimour  
Navara David – Gashimov Vugar  
Grischuk Alexander – Carlsen Magnus  
Adams Michael – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Bacrot Etienne – Inarkiev Ernesto  
Yue Wang – Svidler Peter  

This video is from the Official website of Fide-Baku-2008


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Enjoy these images from the Baku-fide official site… round 9 was played today…
Please click
HERE to play through some of the games of the Grandmasters played in round 9.

 

….ahw….isn’t he mummy’s sweet little boy!

….yeah, yeah, yeah….let’s do it…before they call it  a
2move-
checkmate-game!

 

…er….where is that rule again…the handshake rule… um…oh yeah…here…

…. that’s my boy! let’s shake it!

…oh dear!…who taught you to start with  that pawn!!

….come on Magnus…I’ve been waiting for this day! ….you’re taking too long now!

 Is everything alright, my boy? “Daddy” will keep an eye on you…ok…?

 

….and one more smile for mummy!..ahw…so sweet….

 

…er….I did say I’m sorry….so could we start  playing now….you are playing white…ain’t you?

On the side bar of the blog you will find a link to “live games” to see what the players cooked up for us today in round 9.

Standings after round 9!

1 Grischuk Alexander 2716 RUS 6
2 Gashimov Vugar 2679 AZE 5½
Wang Yue 2689 CHN 5½
4 Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5
5 Carlsen Magnus 2765 NOR 5
6 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2752 AZE 5
7 Adams Michael 2729 ENG 5
8 Bacrot Etienne 2705 FRA 4½
9 Kamsky Gata 2726 USA 4½
10 Svidler Peter 2746 RUS 4
11 Karjakin Sergey 2732 UKR 4
12 Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 3½
13 Inarkiev Ernesto 2684 RUS 3
14 Navara David

Pairings for rounds 10-13. Tomorrow, the 1st May…is a free day.

Round 10 on 02/05/08 at 15:00
 
         
Kamsky Gata – Yue Wang    
Svidler Peter – Bacrot Etienne    
Inarkiev Ernesto – Adams Michael  
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar – Grischuk Alexander
Carlsen Magnus – Navara David  
Gashimov Vugar – Karjakin Sergey  
Radjabov Teimour – Cheparinov Ivan  
         
Round 11 on 03/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Cheparinov Ivan – Kamsky Gata  
Karjakin Sergey – Radjabov Teimour  
Navara David – Gashimov Vugar  
Grischuk Alexander – Carlsen Magnus  
Adams Michael – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Bacrot Etienne – Inarkiev Ernesto  
Yue Wang – Svidler Peter    
         
Round 12 on 04/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Kamsky Gata – Svidler Peter    
Inarkiev Ernesto – Yue Wang    
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar – Bacrot Etienne  
Carlsen Magnus – Adams Michael  
Gashimov Vugar – Grischuk Alexander  
Radjabov Teimour – Navara David  
Cheparinov Ivan – Karjakin Sergey  
         
Round 13 on 05/05/08 at 14:00  
         
Karjakin Sergey – Kamsky Gata    
Navara David – Cheparinov Ivan  
Grischuk Alexander – Radjabov Teimour  
Adams Michael – Gashimov Vugar  
Bacrot Etienne – Carlsen Magnus  
Yue Wang – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar  
Svidler Peter – Inarkiev Ernesto   

Enjoy the video from the FideBaku2008 website.
 

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Chess players in Baku had a free day  yesterday! See how they spent their day…playing football…watch  the second movie to see the players in action!

 

Images: Fide.com

Sergey Karjakin, from Ukraine, (Ukrainian: Сергій Карякін; born January 12, 1990 in Simferopol) is a top chess player. At the age of twelve years and seven months he became the youngest grandmaster in history. On the FIDE ranking list of April 2008, he has a rating of 2732, making him number 14 in the world, number 2 in the category of boys up to 20 years old and number 2 in the  Ukraine. On this first movie you can see the interview held with him. Both movies can be watched on the Fide.com site too.

 

 

Round 6 will be played today. You can see the pairings on this image.

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Round 5 can be called “The (K)nights..or is it..the day of the draws”…Click on the images for a larger view… on the second image…. Radjabov’s attention was caught by…. I wonder…by what! hehehe  On this next image you can see the end position of Kamsky and Carlsen’s game… on the side bar of the blog..you will find a “live” link where you can play through the games of the day…and on THIS LINK you will find a games-link to all the games played so far in all the finished rounds.

On these images you can see the pairings for round 6-8. Tomorrow is a free day.

baku fortress

The Fortress Wall of Old City Baku

By Fuad Akhundov
The fortress wall of the old city of Baku is a source of pride to Bakuites. Not every city with a rampart constructed at the time of the Crusaders is so well preserved. Nor do many extend for a distance of 500 meters, as Baku’s rampart does. The rampart also enabled the preservation of the medieval image of the old town, with its numerous lanes, snaking streets and the flavor of an oriental city.

Initially, two ramparts encircled Baku. The internal rampart is almost completely preserved. It was constructed by King Manuchekhr II (1120-1149). The outer wall was much lower in height, and was installed by the local ruler, Zufuqar-khan in 1608-1609. The walls were surrounded by a deep moat that could be filled by underground water in times of danger.

The khanate of Baku (a kind of Muslim duchy) was annexed to the Russian Empire in 1806. The fortress walls were last used for defense in 1826. Cannons mounted on the walls repelled a last, desperate Persian attack.

At the beginning of industrial exploitation of oil in the 1870’s, Baku grew rapidly. In 1859, the population of the city barely exceeded 13,500 inhabitants, most of who lived inside the old city walls. By 1903, there were 143,000 Bakuites, and by 1913, the “black gold” had increased the population to more than 214,000.

The tiny medieval fortress was, of course, too small to hold all these people. So the outer rampart was taken down in 1884, along with the wall on side of the old city facing the sea. Stones from this wall were used to renovate the inner wall.

But Bakuites did not want to lose the old, outer wall forever. The primary entrance to the old city, Shemakha Gate had one gate in the outer wall, and one in the inner wall. So, as the outer was dissembled, stonemasons skillfully inserted a copy of the outer entrance into the inner wall, side by side with the original inside gate. A visitor with a sharp eye for color will notice that the stones of the left entrance are slightly whiter. City residents renamed the gates “Gosha-Gala Gapysy,” meaning, in Azeri, the Twin Gates. This is the only double entrance among the five gates of the fortress wall.

The most interesting detail over both entrances is the oldest coat of arms of Baku. It is composed of two lions, and the head of a bull with two discs around the bull’s head. The German traveler, Kempfer, deciphered the symbols in 1863, as follows:

Lions were often used in Oriental heraldry as symbols of strength. The bull and the cow were sacred animals to the Zoroastrians (even today, killing these animals is prohibited in India). The discs symbolized the sun and moon. So, Kempfer concluded, the lions (that is, the fortress walls) protect the bull (i.e., the city) during day (the sun) and night (the moon).

This oldest emblem of Baku probably did not meet with favor when Islam arrived in Baku, and was at some point consigned to history. Other emblems took their place until the 1880’s. Then, a new coat of arms was designed with three torch flames representing the Zoroastrian tradition. But the way the flames were carved in the limestone of the mayor’s office, they resemble moneybags. So people used to joke that the emblem had nothing to do with fire, but represented the wealth of Baku during the first oil boom.
Source:
Read HERE MORE! about Baku.

see some wonderful photos about Baku on: bakuphotos.blogspot.com
Read on THIS LINK about the world’s 25 dirtiest cities, which Baku is apparently one of them. Baku 2016 Olympic…Baku is officially bidding for the 2016 Summer Olympics …read on the link more…

Pollution
The World’s Dirtiest Cities
Tiffany M. Luck 02.26.08, 3:15 PM ET

Unless you’re in the oil business, there’s little reason to brave the choking pollution of Baku, Azerbaijan. Fetid water, oil ponds and life-threatening levels of air pollution emitted from drilling and shipping land the former Soviet manufacturing center at the bottom of this year’s list as the world’s dirtiest city.

Baku is bad, but far from alone. For residents of the 25 cities on this year’s list, black plumes of smoke, acid rain and free-flowing sewage are part of everyday life. Not as immediately visible: the impact on the population’s health and life expectancy.

To see which cities in the world were dirtiest, we turned to Mercer Human Resource Consulting’s 2007 Health and Sanitation Rankings. As part of their 2007 Quality of Life Report, they ranked 215 cities worldwide based on levels of air pollution, waste management, water potability, hospital services, medical supplies and the presence of infectious disease.

All cities are positioned against New York, the base city with an index score of 100. For the Health and Sanitation Rankings, the index scores range from the worst on the list–Baku, Azerbaijan, with a score of 27.6–to the best on the list–Calgary, Canada, with a score of 131.7.

Lead-poisoned air lands Dhaka, Bangladesh, the No. 2 spot on the list. Traffic congestion in the capital continues to worsen with vehicles emitting fatal amounts of air pollutants daily, including lead. The World Bank-funded Air Quality Management Project aims to help.

“Addressing air pollution is the easiest way to be able to fix someone’s well-being because we’re always breathing, and there are all sorts of harmful particulates in the air,” says Richard Fuller, founder of the New York-based Blacksmith Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to solving the pollution problems of the developing world. “In fact, the biggest pathway for lead poisoning is particulates in the air. So in areas with a lot of air pollution, shutting down the worst forces of these types of pollution really does make a difference.”

Nos. 3 and 4 on this year’s list are the capital cities of Madagascar and Haiti, respectively. Antananarivo, Madagascar and Port au Prince, Haiti, both face the challenge of a rapidly growing urban population and the ever-growing need for efficient water and waste management.

Mexico City, Mexico, ranks No. 5 on this year’s list. Residents can thank industrial and automobile emissions for air quality so bad that city ozone levels fail to meet World Health Organization standards an estimated 300 days of the year. But things could be worse.

“Mexico City has actually seen great improvement recently in terms of air pollution,” says Dave Calkins, founder of the Sierra Nevada Air Quality Group and former chief of the Air Planning Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in San Francisco. “So much so that the government actually has to campaign to let everyone know that pollution is still a problem.”

Economies suffer, too. Health care costs and lost productivity drag on business. Companies also face added costs in the form of remuneration packages when relocating employees and their families to some of these cities, noted Slagin Parakatil, senior researcher at Mercer. Cost-benefit analysis certainly suggests making progress toward cleanup. According to a study done by WaterAid, for every $1 spent on improved sanitation, the benefit equals $9 resulting from decreased cost of health care and increased productivity.

“If you do the numbers,” says Fuller, “to clean up the worst of it doesn’t really cost that much. It’s the 90/10 rule. To do 90% of the work only costs 10% of the money. It’s the last 10% of the cleanup that costs 90% of the money. For relatively little, we can do an awful lot to save a whole lot of lives.” Source: See the link in the start of this article.
 
Baku Round 5 from the Fide website

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Click on the images to see a larger view. These are results from round 4, the Chess Grand Prix tournament in Baku, Azerbaijan. If you click HERE you will find a games-link and you can play through the games played in the previous rounds…on the side bar of my blog, you will find a link to the current round’s games.

All images from the Official Fide-Baku-Chess-site.

 

Pairings for round 5

 

Baku…city…wall

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Azerbaijan is now a world of chess! GrandMasters in the world of Chess are there for this prestigious event taking place in Baku. Round 4 results now available too. On my side bar you can follow the games LIVE. Look for the “Fide Grand Prix”-link! Read HERE more about Azerbaijan.

Please click HERE to play through the games of Gashimov vs. Svidler, Carlsen vs. Inarkiev and Navara vs. Grischuk in round 3 played on the 23rd April.
Click HERE for the results of round 4.

 

 

On this table you can see the results after round 3. The video can also be seen on
Baku’s Official website
and it’s about round 2! See more photos on this link too.

 

 

 

Peter Svidler: Image – Chessvibes

Michael Adams…Image: Chessvibes

 

Kamsky…examined by security before entering …Image: Chessvibes

Carlsen…and security…see more images on Chessvibes.com


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The first move is officially made at the board of Magnus Carlsen (White) against Wang Yue (Black). Standing from left to right: Geoffrey Borg (CEO Global Chess), Elisabeta Polihroniade (Deputy Chief Arbiter), Azad Rahimov (Minister for Youth and Sport, Azerbaijan), Elman Rustamov (Chairman, President of Azerbaijan Chess Federation), Zurab Azmaiparashvili (Technical Adviser).

Baku 2008 has started, and with it the first FIDE Grand Prix Series.

Please click HERE for the Official website in Baku. There are videos to see and games in PGN Files.

Standings in the first 7 positions so far:

Kamsky, Radjabov, Adams, Grischuk, Karjakin, Navara, Carlsen

 On THIS LINK link you can see results and pairings.

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Judith Polgar was born in Hungary on 23 July 1976. Her childhood consisted of an extensive chess education from her father and her sisters, and she began to compete internationally as early as 1984. In 1991 she became an International Grandmaster by winning the “men’s” Hungarian championship. At fifteen years and five months of age, she was the youngest grandmaster in history, breaking a record that Robert James Fischer had held for over 30 years. She has been the highest-rated woman ever since FIDE’s January 1990 list, and in 2003 she entered the overall top ten. In 2005, she became the first woman to take part in the final of the FIDE World Championship (see World Chess Championship (2005)). However, she finished last out of the eight players and fell to 14th in the world rankings after the event.
Polgar’s career-best tournament performances include four victories at Essent (twice shared), clear first at Madrid 1994, and clear second at Corus 2003. She currently lives in Budapest with her husband and their two children. Her sister, Susan Polgar, is also a grandmaster and you will find her blog-link on my blog on the Chess Blogroll…..
See her games collections
HERE


Name: Peter Svidler
Age: 31 (6/17/1976)
FIDE Title: Grandmaster (gained his GM norms in 1994)
Current ELO rating: 2763 (FIDE rating list)
Current Chess960 rating: 2733 (Chess960 rating list)
Current coach: IM Andrei Lukin
Hobbies: Listening to good music, reading, cricket and any kind of billiards

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

* Chess960 World Champion (Mainz 2003, 04 & 05)
* FIDE World Chess Championship Semifinalist (Moscow 2001)
* Russian Champion: 1994, 95, 97 & 2003
* Olympic Champion: 1994, 96, 98, 2000 & 2002 / Silver medal: 36th Chess Olympiad (2004)
* Co-winner of Tilburg 1997 & Dortmund 1998 & 2006
Read more about Peter Svidler HERE on his official site.

Click on the link to play through the game – played in 2005 Corus A-tournament- of Judith Polgar and Peter Svidler Polgar vs. Svidler – Corus A – Round 1, 2005

Judith Polgar shocks Anatoly Karpov

January 16, 2003 19:48 IST

World Cup champion Vishwanathan Anand did not require even a single original move to earn a comfortable draw with veteran Dutch Grandmaster Jan Timman while Judith Polgar shot into sole lead after a thumping victory over Anatoly Karpov in the fourth round of 65th Corus chess tournament in Wijk Aan Zee (the Netherlands) on Thursday.

Polgar, the world’s best women’s player, produced an amazing display of her attacking prowess against the former Russian world champion to take the sole lead with three points.

The Russian duo of Braingames match winner Vladimir Kramnik and Evegeny Bareev, Spaniard Alexei Shirov and Anand are close on the heels of the leader half a point behind while as many as five players including Karpov are tied with a fifty per cent score at fifth place.

In the Grandmaster Group ‘B’ tournament, former world junior girls’ champion Koneru Humpy drew with women’s World championship finalist Alexandra Kosteniuk of Russia to take her tally to 1.5/4.
Read the entire news article HERE ….

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Picture: Johan Steenkamp – facing the camera.
 Note: Centurion is near Pretoria, about 10-15 min drive from Pretoria on your way to Jo’burg. (Johannesburg). Centurion is this year 100 years old!

Chess players about to make their move
LISA DEWBERRY

Februarie 2008

The Centurion Chess Club will soon be presenting one of the biggest chess tournaments of its kind in Gauteng and the only South African tournament listed on the international Fidé Calendar.
The 16th Annual Centurion Chess Open Tournament will be presented at the Kleinkaap Conference Centre in Clubview from 30 April to 4 May.

Johan Steenkamp, of the Centurion Chess Club, says the various sections of the event will open doors for all chess players regardless of their playing strength.

The section for players of 13 years and younger will be played on 1 and 2 May only, while the more experienced players can participate in either an A or B section from 1 until 4 May.

“Seven rounds will be played during the tournament and players can compete in four divisions including an elite division which displays the ability of some of the best players in Southern Africa,” says Steenkamp.

According to him, this tournament attracts more than 250 players each year and boasts as being the tournament with the most prize money in Gauteng.

“For the first time ever, the club will present an internationally recognised section to start on 30 April.

“Some grandmaster and international master players from countries as far as the Ukraine have already indicated they wish to participate,” says Steenkamp.

He says that he and other members of the Centurion Chess Club are planning to take part in the tournament and says that the Centurion Chess Club is arguably the best chess club in South Africa.

“The club prides itself on developing high calibre chess players through rigorous competitive programmes. Last year for the seventh time in a row, the Centurion Chess Club’s A-team won the Gauteng Premier League,” says Steenkamp.

He says that this is a record number of wins and a record number of consecutive wins since the start of the league in the Seventies.The club has also won the South African inter-club tournament and been host to the prestigious BIS Open Chess Tournament.

The Annual Centurion Chess Open Tournament is open to all chess players. For more information visit http://www.centurionchessclub. co.za.
Read the news article in it’s original form HERE

Read HERE what I’ve said this morning about Elise Steenkamp- in the comments…
Click HERE to see a map of Centurion.

Need a place to stay?

Image: Centurion Lake Hotel…Click HERE for details and more places.

Image: Stefan Du Toit, Grade 7, the new SA o/14 Chess Champion. He’s from Tygerpoort Primary School, Pretoria.
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