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chess_Candidates_2016-

chess_candidates_2016

Who is going to be the winner? 

The World Chess Candidates that takes place  on March 10 – 30, 2016, is a dramatic tournament which determines the challenger for the World Chess Championship. The winner will play a match for the title against reigning World Champion Magnus Carlsen in November in the US.

Candidates Chess 2016 participants
1. Vishwanathan Anand (India) – The player who lost the 2014 World Championship Match
2. Sergey Karjakin (Russia) – as winner of the FIDE World Cup in Baku
3. Peter Svidler (Russia) – as the silver medalist of the FIDE World Cup in Baku
4. Fabiano Caruana (USA/Italy) – from FIDE Grand Prix 2014–15
5. Hikaru Nakamura (USA) – from FIDE Grand Prix 2014–15
6. Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) – By rating
7. Anish Giri (Netherlands) – By rating
8. Levon Aronian (Armenia) – organizers nominee of rating higher than 2725 ELO
Candidates 2016 details
Details of the Tournament:
Dates: March 8 – 29, 2016
Number of players: 8
Format: Double round robin tournament (14 rounds)
Length: 22 days including arrivals, departures, opening and closing ceremonies
Prize fund: EUR 561,000 

Please click here for live cover on chessdom.

ROUND 1 Anand 1 – 0 Topalov Please click HERE to play through the game of GM Anand and GM Topalov.

ROUND 2 – Please click HERE to play through the game of GM Aronian vs GM Anand.
Aronian: 1/2 – 1/2 Anand
Chess_Candidates_2016_Anand

ROUND 6

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 O-O Be7 6 Re1 b5 7 Bb3 O-O 8 a4 Bb7 9 d3 Re8 10 Nbd2 Bf8 11 c3 Na5 12 Bc2 c5 13 d4 exd4 14 cxd4 d5 15 e5 Ne4 16 axb5 axb5 17 Nxe4 dxe4 18 Rxe4 Nb3 19 Rxa8 Bxa8 20 Ng5 Nxc1 21 Qh5 h6 22 Qxf7+ Kh8 23 Rg4 Qa5 24 h4
GM Anand 1-0 GM Svidler

ROUND 7
GM Giri 1/2 GM Anand
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 Nc3 Nbd7 5 Qc2 Bb4 6 a3 Bxc3+ 7 Qxc3 O-O 8 Bg5 h6 9 Bh4 c5 10 e3 cxd4 11 Qxd4 Re8 12 Bxf6 Nxf6 13 cxd5 Nxd5 14 Be2 Nf6 15 Qxd8 Rxd8 16 O-O Bd7 17 Rfc1 Rac8 18 Kf1 Kf8 19 Ke1 Ke7 20 Ne5 Rxc1+ 21 Rxc1 Rc8 22 Rxc8 Bxc8 23 f4 Nd7 24 Nxd7 Bxd7 25 Kd2 Kd6 26 Kc3 e5 27 g3 b6 28 Bc4 f6 29 b4 g5 30 h4 gxh4 31 gxh4

Round 9

GM Anand, Viswanathan 1-0  GM Aronian, Levon 

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Bc5 4 O-O d6 5 d3 Nf6 6 c3 a6 7 a4 Ba7 8 Na3 Ne7 9 Nc2 Ng6 10 Be3 O-O 11 Bxa7 Rxa7 12 Ne3 Ng4 13 Qd2 a5 14 d4 Ra8 15 dxe5 N4xe5 16 Nxe5 Nxe5 17 Bb3 Nd7 18 Bc2 Re8 19 f3 b6 20 Rfd1 Nc5 21 b4 Nd7 22 Bb3 Nf6 23 Qd4 Qe7 24 Nd5 Nxd5 25 Bxd5 Ra7 26 b5 Bb7 27 c4 Qe5 28 Rac1 Qxd4+ 29 Rxd4 Kf8 30 Kf2 Ke7 31 f4 f6 32 Rc3 Kd7 33 Rh3 h6 34 Rg3 Re7 35 Rg6 Bxd5 36 cxd5 Ra8 37 Kf3 Rae8 38 Kg4 Rxe4 39 Rxg7+ Kc8 40 Rd2 Kb8 41 Rc2 Rc8 42 Ra2 Rd4 43 Kf5 Rxd5+ 44 Kxf6 Rf8+ 45 Rf7 Rxf7+ 46 Kxf7 Rf5+ 47 Kg6 Rxf4 48 g3 Rc4 49 Kxh6 d5 50 Kh5 d4 51 g4 d3 52 h4 Rd4 53 Rd2 Kc8 54 g5 Kd7 55 Kg6 Rxh4 56 Rxd3+ Ke8 57 Ra3 Rc4 58 Kg7 Kd7 59 g6 c6 60 Kf6 cxb5 61 g7 Rg4 62 axb5 Rg1 63 Rd3+ Ke8 64 Re3+ Kd7 65 Re5 Rxg7 66 Rd5+ 1-0

Round 11 – GM Anand vs GM Sergey 1-0
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 Nf6 4 d3 Bc5 5 c3 O-O 6 O-O d6 7 h3 Ne7 8 d4 Bb6 9 Bd3 d5 10 Nxe5 Nxe4 11 Nd2 Nd6 12 Nb3 c6 13 Nc5 Ng6 14 Qh5 Bxc5 15 dxc5 Ne4 16 Bxe4 dxe4 17 Rd1 Qe7 18 Nxg6 hxg6 19 Qg5 Qxg5 20 Bxg5 f6 21 Be3 g5 22 Rd6 Re8 23 Rad1 Be6 24 b3 Kf7 25 R1d4 Bf5 26 a4 Re7 27 g4 Bh7 28 b4 Bg8 29 b5 Rc8 30 Rd7 Rce8 31 b6 a6 32 Rc7 Kf8 33 c4 Be6 34 Rxe4 Kf7 35 f4 Rxc7 36 bxc7 Rc8 37 f5 Bd7 38 h4 g6 39 Rd4 Rxc7 40 hxg5 fxg5 41 Bxg5 Be8 42 f6 Kf8 43 Bf4 Rh7 44 Kg2 Bd7 45 Bg5 Be6 46 Rd8+ Kf7 47 Rb8 Bxc4 48 Rxb7+ Kg8 49 Rb8+ Kf7 50 Kg3 Ke6 51 Re8+ Kf7 52 Rc8 Bd5 53 Kf4 Ke6 54 Re8+ Kd7 55 Ra8 Ke6 56 Re8+ Kd7 57 Re3 a5 58 Kg3 Rf7 59 Kf4 Rh7 60 Re1 Kc8 61 Kg3 Rf7 62 Re8+ Kd7 63 Ra8 Kc7 64 Kf4 Rd7 65 Bh4 Kb7 66 Re8 Bf7 67 Re4 Bd5 68 Re3 Bf7 69 Kg5 Ka6 70 Re7 1-0

Results: chessbase

Congratulations to GM Sergey Karjakin!

Sergey-Karjakin

Sergey Karjakin is going to the FIDE World Chess Championship Final 2016 in New York after winning the Candidates Chess 2016 tournament with 8,5/14. In the decisive round 14 Karjakin won the final game against Fabiano Caruana and surged a full point ahead in the standings. The Russian player is going to face the defending champion Magnus Carlsen.

Sergey-Karjakin1

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Henry_Kamsky

Henry’s game vs Kamsky. Tromso round 4

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 d6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. a3 O-O 7. Ba2 Nc6 8. d3 Rb8 9. Re1 b5 10. Ne2 a5 11. Ng3 b4 12. c3 Ba6 13. d4 bxc3 14. bxc3 Nd7 15. Bf4 e5 16. Be3 cxd4 17. cxd4 exd4 18. Nxd4 Nxd4 19. Bxd4 Ne5 20. Rb1 g6 21. Rxb8 Qxb8 22. f4 Nd3 23. Nf5 Re8 24. Nh6+ Kf8 25. Qa1 Rc8 26. Bxf7 Bh4 27. Rf1 Rc2 28. f5 Ne5 29. fxg6 Bxf1 30. Qxf1 hxg6 31. Bxg6+ Bf2+ 32. Bxf2 Kg7 33. Bh5 Kxh6 34. Be3+ Kg7 35. h4 Qc8 36. Qd1 Qc6 37. Qe1 Kh7 38. Bg5 Qc5+ 39. Kh2 Qf2 40. Qxf2 Rxf2 41. Be7 Rd2 42. Be8 Rd3 43. g3 Ng6 44. Bd8 Rxa3 45. h5 Ne5 46. Bc7 Re3 47. Bxa5 Rxe4 48. Kh3 Re2 49. Bc7 Rd2 50. g4 Kh6 51. Bb5 Kg5 52. Kg3 Nxg4 53. Bd8+ Nf6 54. h6 Kg6 55. Kf3 Rh2 56. Bc7 Rh3+ 57. Kg2 Rb3 58. Be2 Ne4 59. Bf3 Rb2+ 60. Kg1 Ng5 61. Bg2 Rd2 62. Bb6 Kxh6 63. Be3 Ra2 64. Bf4 Ra6 65. Bf1 Rb6 66. Kf2 Kg6 67. Bd3+ Kf6 68. Ke3 Nf7 69. Bc4 Ne5 70. Bg8 Ra6 71. Ke4 Ra4+ 72. Ke3 Ra8 73. Bh7 Ke6 74. Bc2 Ra3+ 75. Ke2 d5 76. Bh7 d4 77. Be4 Ra2+ 78. Kf1 Nc4 79. Ke1 Ne3 80. Bg3 Rb2 81. Bc7 Nd5 82. Bg3 Nf6 83. Bd3 Kd5 84. Bf4 Nd7 85. Bh7 Ne5 86. Bg3 Nf3+ 87. Kd1 d3 88. Bf4 0-1

kamsky

Round 4: Kamsky Photo-  @Tromso2014 

I was super excited when Gert – also a chess enthusiast, who mainly blogs about great South African Afrikaans writers and poets and writes about movies, musicians, componists, etc.  in general- informed me about the win of Henry Steel vs Gata Kamsky. I have been following this particular group of South African champs for the past few years in the ‘big‘ tournaments like these and they are a strong team of chess players and South Africa can be proud of them. Congratulations to Henry, we hope that your game against Kamsky will inspire the team to do even better. The following images are from Tromso, tweeted out to the twitter community by Susan Polgar.

Tromso_

Tromso_1

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chessMaGNus

@TarjeiJS Tweeted this: ‘Article of the dn.no announcing his new sponsorship deal with Nordic Semiconductor’ 

tromsoview
The view from Tromso, as tweeted by Svensen: ‘The view from my room is acceptable!’ – he is also tweeting about the Tromso Chess World Cup tournament
chessmagnus-

‘Millions flowing in for chess ace’

Magnus and the article as translated by ‘google-translate’ The article can be read in the Norwegian language from the link at the bottom of the entry. To all those little 10 year old boys always saying, ‘ I want to be a footballer’ – what about: ‘I want to be a Magnus Carlsen’ [hehe]

Norwegian sponsors will use the world’s best chess player opener with large customers, writing Todays Market.

On Saturday puts Magnus Carlsen heading to Chennai in India to prepare for the World Cup tournament pending against Viswanathan Anand in November.

On Monday techno now Nordic Semiconductor Carlsen fifth main, next to the law firm Simonsen, brokerage Arctic, newspaper VG house and software company Parallels.

Will he win the World Cup waiting nine million kroner in prize money. In addition, there are about six million in sponsorship revenue and miscellaneous other income.

Thankful
After the DN understand the young chess player will stand to gain a gross turnover of between 15 and 20 million years.

The money goes through the company Magnus Chess, which since 2007 has had a total turnover of 27 million. The profit before tax amounts to 15 million dollars, and Carlsen had at the end of 2012, built up a solid equity of nearly 12 million.

‘ I am very grateful that I can live on something I think is so fun. Beyond that I’m not thinking so much about it’, says Magnus Carlsen about their financial chess moves.

Please click here to read the original article.

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chess_world_cup_2013
It is time for the Chess World Cup 2013 – in Norway
Please click here for the official site.
chessworldcup

Photo and message from Europe-Echecs Twitter account See the official video to know who is taking part. My favourite this time? I think Etienne Bacrot.

chess-tromso1
Chess Players arriving at the university of Tromso for the opening ceremony – photo SPolgar [twitter]

chess-tromso
Susan Polgar doing exactly what she says on these tweets

chess-tromso2

chessjudit
Susan interviews her ‘baby’ sister, Judit on 13/8/2013

chess-tromso2-
NO Susan, he is NOT funny and insightful, read HERE why I don’t think he is and make sure you read the first 10 lines carefully. [hmf]
tromso_barentsobserver

Tromso – image: Barents Observer

Tromso
Lovely colourful houses in Tromso [image:getintotravel]

Tromso
Tromso Chess – 17/8/2013 Game 3 round 1

tromso-p

Tromso round 3 tight security

chessworldcupfinal
Final game 1 – Kramnik wins

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anand_magnus_chennai_

New Delhi: Viswanathan Anand will defend his World Chess Championship title against world number one Magnus Carlsen in his home city as FIDE today chose Chennai as the venue for the prestigious match.

Even as it has been reported that Carlsen was not keen to play in Chennai and instead preferred Paris as the venue, the FIDE Presidential Board confirmed Chennai as the venue during a meeting at Baku, Azerbaijan today.

The match between the Indian and his Norwegian opponent will be played from November 6 to 26.

“The agreement was signed today at Baku by Bharat Singh, Hony Secretary All India Chess Federation and FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov,” a press released stated.

Anand had defeated Boris Gelfand of Israel to retain his title in 2012. Source: Zeenews.india

Farewell Farewell

A variation on the Cento – used Shakespeare-lines about Chess

There stands the castle!
My day’s delight is past
great shouts within
and all cry

A horse! A horse!
I have a horse and
a wandering knight.
My skipping king
ambles up and down

A wandering knight?
The knight is here
… a mean knight

The hour is almost past
Farewell Farewell


It’s hilarious – Carlsen’s coach?

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Reykjavik_Open_2013

Reykjavik Open 2013

Reykjavik_Open

Reykjavik_Open_schedule

Schedule

AnishGiri

Anish Giri

IvanCheparinov

Click HERE to play through the chess games of Cheparinov on chessgames.com

Some of the players: David Navara, Anish Giri,  Johan-Sebastian  Christiansen, Svetoslav Mihajlov, Ivan Cheparinov,  Claude Hoegener, Sebastian  Mihajlov, Gawain Jones and Per Isaksson

reykjavikchess

The tournament are held in Harpa, Reykjavik´s spectacular new music hall on the harbour : 19th – 27th February 2013

The City of Reykjavík has sponsored the tournament since its inception in 1964, when Mikhail Tal won it with a record 12½ points out of 13. The tournament was initially held every two years, but has since 2008 taken place every year. It was closed in its early years, but has been an open event since the 1980s. Throughout its history the Reykjavik Open has featured many of the strongest chess players in the world at the time, including Mikhail Tal, Nona Gaprindashvili, David Bronstein, Vasili Smyslov, Bent Larsen, Friðrik Ólafsson, Mark Taimanov, Lev Polugaevsky, Jan Timman, Victor Korchnoi, Samuel Reshevsky, Anthony Miles, Nigel Short, Hikaru Nakamura, Judit Polgar, Magnus Carlsen, Alexander Grischuk, Fabiano Caruana and Hou Yifan.  Official site: reykjavikopen.com

Games can be followed live HERE on livestream or on the Chessbomb site.
Click HERE to view the chess results of the various rounds of the tournament and rankings/pairings on the site of chess-results.com.
Reykjavik_Giri_round1
Round 1 – Anish Giri

Reykjavik_round1_anish_giri

Reykjavik_Navara_round1
Round 1 David Navara 1-0

moves 17-20 – 17. O-O  Bc3   18. Ne7+ Kh8   19. Qd6 Ra6   20. Bxa6 1-0

Reykjavik_round1_Ivan_Cheparinov

Claude Hoegener vs Ivan Cheparinov 0-1 End position

Moves

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. dxc5 Nc6 5. cxd6 Nxe4 6. Nf3 Nxd6 7. h3 e5 8. Na3 f6 9. Nc4 Be6 10. Nxd6+ Bxd6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Qa4 Kh8 13. Rd1 Qe7 14. Bc4 Bd7 15. Qc2 e4 16. Qd2 exf3 17. gxf3 Bb8 18. Qxd7 Qxd7 19. Rxd7 Ne5 20. Be6 Nxd7 21. Bxd7 Bc7 22. O-O Rad8 23. Bf5 Bb6 24. Bc1 g6 25. Be4 Rd7 26. c4 Re8 27. b4 f5 28. c5 fxe4 29. cxb6 axb6 30. Be3 exf3 31. Bxb6 Re6 32. Bc5 Ra6 33. Re1 Rxa2 34. Re3 Rd1+ 35. Kh2 Rxf2+ 36. Kg3 Re2 37. Rxf3 Kg8 38. h4 h5 39. Rc3 Re4 0-1

Reykjavik_Cheparinov

Moves  – Cheparinov 1 – Wang 0 – Round 2

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. h3 Be6 9. Qf3 Nbd7 10. g4 Nb6 11. O-O-O Rc8 12. Nc5 O-O 13. g5 Nfd7 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Qg4 Kh8 16. g6 Rf4 17. Bxf4 exf4 18. Qxe6 Ne5 19. gxh7 Qc7 20. Rg1 Rf8 21. Bc4 Kxh7 22. Bb3 Qd7 23. h4 Qxe6 24. Bxe6 Rf6 25. Bf5+ g6 26. Rxg6 Nxg6 27. h5 Kg7 28. hxg6 Rf8 29. Ne2 Rh8 30. Rg1 Nc4 31. Nd4 f3 32. Ne6+ Kg8 33. b3 Ne5 34. g7 Rh5 35. Kd1 Bh4 36. Nf4 Rg5 37. Rxg5 Bxg5 38. Nh5 Bh6 39. Be6+ Nf7 40. c4 b6 41. Kc2 a5 42. Kd3 Bg5 43. e5 dxe5 44. Ke4 Bh6 45. Kf5 Bxg7 46. Nxg7 Kxg7 47. Bxf7 Kxf7 48. Kxe5 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_

Round 3 – Cheparinov vs Huang position after move 24

Moves up to move 24
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. b3 Bg7 4. Bb2 O-O 5. g3 d6 6. d4 e5 7. dxe5 Nfd7 8. Nc3 dxe5 9. Qc2 Nc6 10. Rd1 Re8 11. Nd5 Nc5 12. b4 Bf5 13. Qc1 Na4 14. Ba1 Nd4 15. Ne3 Be4 16. Bg2 Qe7 17. Kf1 Rad8 18. c5 a5 19. bxa5 Nxc5 20. Ne1 Bh6 21. Bc3 Bxg2+ 22. N1xg2 Ne4 23. Be1 Qe6 24. Qb1 Nd6 *

Reykjavik_Navara

Navara vs Ris – Round 4 Endposition    1-0 

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. e4 Bg4 8. Bb5+ c6 9. Ng5 O-O 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 Na6 12. Qh3 h6 13. Nf3 Qd7 14. Qh4 g5 15. Bxg5 hxg5 16. Nxg5 Rfd8 17. Qh5 e5 18. O-O f6 19. Qh7+ Kf8 20. f4 exd4 21. f5 fxg5 22. f6 Bh8 23. Qxh8+ Kf7 24. Qg7+ Ke6 25. f7 Kd6 26. Nxd4 Kc7 27. Qe5+ Qd6 28. Ne6+ 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round4

Cheparinov Round 4 Endposition 1/2

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O exd4 8. Nxd4 Re8 9. f3 c6 10. Kh1 Nbd7 11. Bf4 Ne5 12. Qd2 a5 13. b3 Nfd7 14. Bg5 f6 15. Bh6 Bxh6 16. Qxh6 Nc5 17. Rad1 Nf7 18. Qd2 Bd7 19. Rfe1 Qb6 20. Nc2 f5 21. Qd4 Qd8 22. exf5 Bxf5 23. Ne3 Bd7 24. Bf1 Ne6 25. Qd2 Nc5 26. g3 Qf6 27. Bg2 Qg7 28. f4 Re7 29. g4 Rae8 30. g5 h6 31. h4 hxg5 32. hxg5 Qh8+ 33. Kg1 Qh4 34. Qf2 Qxf2+ 35. Kxf2 Bf5 36. Bf1 Bd7 37. Nc2 Kg7 38. Rxe7 Rxe7 39. Re1 Rxe1 40. Nxe1 Bf5 41. Ke3 Nd8 42. Nf3 Nde6 43. Nh4 Bg4 44. Bg2 Kf7 45. Ne4 Nxe4 46. Bxe4 Bh5 47. a3 Nc5 48. Bc2 b6 49. f5 gxf5 50. Nxf5 Kg6 51. b4 axb4 52. axb4 Kxg5 53. bxc5 dxc5 54. Nd6 Kf6 55. Ba4 Ke5 56. Nc8 ½-½
Standings after 4 rounds: top ten positions

1 GM Yu Yangyi CHN 2688 4.0
2 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 2678 4.0
3 GM Gajewski Grzegorz POL 2644 4.0
4 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime FRA 2715 4.0
5 GM Cheparinov Ivan BUL 2709 3.5
6 GM So Wesley PHI 2684 3.5
7 GM Giri Anish NED 2722 3.5
8 GM Socko Bartosz POL 2643 3.5
9 GM Baklan Vladimir UKR 2609 3.5
10 GM Jones Gawain ENG 2637 3.5

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round5

Round 5 -Cheparinov 1 Kristiansson 0

Round 5 – moves Cheparinov vs Kristiansson

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. d4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 a6 6. Bxd7+ Bxd7 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 Rc8 9. Nc3 e5 10. Qd3 Qa5 11. Nd2 Be6 12. Nf1 g5 13. Bg3 Nf6 14. Ne3 Be7 15. O-O Qc5 16. Rfd1 b5 17. a4 h5 18. f3 b4 19. Ne2 g4 20. Bf2 Qc6 21. c3 Rg8 22. Kh1 h4 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. exd5 Qc4 25. Qxc4 Rxc4 26. b3 Rc8 27. c4 h3 28. Ng3 hxg2+ 29. Kxg2 Kd7 30. a5 gxf3+ 31. Kxf3 Ng4 32. Bg1 f5 33. Ra4 Rb8 34. Rf1 Nh6 35. Ba7 Ra8 36. Bb6 f4 37. Ne4 Nf5 38. Rxb4 Rab8 39. Ra4 Rxb6 40. Nc5+ dxc5 41. axb6 Nd6 42. Rfa1 e4+ 43. Kxf4 Bg5+ 44. Kg4 Bf6+ 45. Kf4 Bxa1 46. Rxa1 Rf8+ 47. Kg4 Kc8 48. Rxa6 Kb7 49. Ra7+ Kxb6 50. Re7 Ka5 51. Re6 Rd8 52. Kf4 Kb4 53. Ke5 Kxb3 54. Rxd6 Rxd6 55. Kxd6 e3 0-1

Reykjavik_standings

Standings after round 5 – Top Ten

Reykjavik_pairings_round6
Pairings Round 6 – top 16 boards

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round6

Round 6 Cheparinov 0- Eljanov 1 

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 a6 5. a4 e6 6. g3 dxc4 7. Bg2 c5 8. O-O cxd4 9. Nxd4 Be7 10. a5 O-O 11. Nc2 Qc7 12. Be3 Bd7 13. Bb6 Qc8 14. Ne3 Bb5 15. Rc1 Nfd7 16. Na4 Bg5 17. f4 Nxb6 18. Nxb6 Qc5 19. Rf3 Bf6 20. Nxa8 Rd8 21. Qe1 Nc6 22. Nb6 Bd4 23. Kf2 e5 24. b4 Nxb4 25. fxe5 Nc6 26. Qd2 c3 27. Qc2 Nxe5 28. Qf5 g6 29. Qf4 Re8 30. Nd5 Qxd5 31. Kf1 Nxf3 0-1

Reykjavik_open_2013-
Pairings round 7 – 24th February at 13:00

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Indeed the name Prokofiev needs little introduction, as one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. However his connection to chess might be a little less obvious, even to the musically enlightened. As to David Oistrakh, he was one of the very greatest violinists, whose virtuosity ranked alongside Fritz Kreisler and Jasha Heifetz. Both of them were passionate chess players, though Prokofiev more than one would believe.
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev, born April 23, 1891, died March 5, 1953 was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor who mastered numerous musical genres and is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century, which include Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Among his best-known works are the 3rd Piano Concerto, the third and fifth symphonies, as well as composed family favourites, such as the ballet Romeo and Juliet – from which “Dance of the Knights” is taken – and Peter and the Wolf. Sergei Prokofiev fell in love with chess at an early age, and during his lifetime never lost his passion for the royal game, befriending chess greats such as Capablanca and Alekhine.The composer met Alekhine in his native Russia in 1900 during an international tournament held there. Alekhine was a member of the organizing committee and Prokofiev had volunteered to accommodate the guests and the players. As the years passed, their friendship solidified. He met Capablanca in January 1914 in Petersburg where the Cuban champion was playing a series of simultaneous games. Prokofiev tried his luck and even managed to win a game!

The game:
[Event “1914 Tournament”]
[Site “St. Petersburg, Russia”]
[Date “1914.05.16”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[Black “Sergei Prokofiev”]
[ECO “D02”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “86”]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 Bf5 4.Qb3 Nc6 5.Qxb7 Na5 6.Qa6 Nxc4
7.Nc3 e6 8.e4 dxe4 9.Bxc4 exf3 10.Qc6+ Nd7 11.g4 Bg6 12.Bg5
Be7 13.Bxe7 Kxe7 14.O-O-O Re8 15.h4 h5 16.gxh5 Bxh5 17.Nb5 Kf8
18.d5 Qf6 19.dxe6 Ne5 20.Qc5+ Kg8 21.exf7+ Bxf7 22.Bxf7+ Qxf7
23.Kb1 Rab8 24.Nxc7 Rbc8 25.Rc1 Re7 26.Qd6 Rexc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7
28.Qe6+ Kh8 29.a3 Qc2+ 30.Ka1 Nd3 31.Rb1 Nxf2 32.h5 Qc6 33.Qf5
Ne4 34.Qxf3 Nd2 35.Qxc6 Rxc6 36.Rd1 Rc2 37.Rg1 Rc5 38.Rg6 Rxh5
39.Ra6 Nb3+ 40.Ka2 Ra5 41.Rxa5 Nxa5 42.b4 g5 43.Kb2 g4 0-1
Another great combination: Chess and music! What’s missing is the poetry! The closest I could get was the poem by Robert Frost.  Please click HERE to read the entire article on Chessbase.

Fire and Ice – Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

You can read my entry on Dance of the knights  on this link. The music is also the theme music to The Apprentice.


A young Sergey Prokofiev with his inseparable board
and chess books. [Image: chessbase]


Prokofiev in his later years remained faithful to his true love [Image: chessbase]

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