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Posts Tagged ‘chess games’

Jaquie vs. Duke of Wellington

This is a game I played against a player called ‘The Duke of Wellington’ – just his nickname. Of course, with a much lower rating than this Duke, I lost the game, but thought it was a good game and good experience. You can play through the game where I played white by clicking on the above link.

I have also discovered that Napoleon played also chess! He played a game against the Duke of Wellington though he was not the only person to play chess against Napoleon. Both the Duke of Wellington and Napoleon Bonaparte where gentlemen chess players – Napoleon had a higher rating.  Chess just before battle of Waterloo – Night 17th June 1815.

The whole art of Chess consists in getting at what is on the other side of the board.
Duke of Wellington

Lord Uxbridge: By God, sir, I’ve lost my Queen!
Wellington: By God, sir, so you have.

Wellington describing Napoleon Game Play. Source – chess.com

Image – google images

Johann Baptist Allgaier (June 19, 1763 – January 3, 1823) was a German-Austrian chess master and theoretician. He was also the author of the first chess handbook in German – Neue theoretisch-praktische Anweisung zum Schachspiel.

This is a game played by Napoleon vs the Turk, alias Johann Allgaier.

https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1250610

Three games purporting to be played by Napoleon are in existence. One of these (a Scotch Game) said to have been played in St Helena between Napoleon and Bertrand, and first printed in Capt. Kennedy’s Reminiscences in the Life of Aug. Fitzsnob (Waifs and Strays, 1862), is certainly fictitious. The second game, said to have been played with Mme von Rémusat, 29 March 1804, and a third game (I.L.N., 1844, 352), played against the Automaton in Vienna, are also of very doubtful authenticity.’ from H.J.R. Murray’s A History of Chess. – Source: chess.com

During this game, the Turk was operated by Johann Allgaier
The automaton was a chess playing machine known as the Turk. It was invented by a Hungarian baron called Wolfgang van Kempelen in 1770. However, the machine did not really play chess. It was a trick. The automaton was a large box, large enough for someone to hide inside and it was this person who played the game. In 1809 Napoleon played against the Turk.
(1)e4e5 (2)Qf3 Nc6 (3) Bc4Nf6 (4) Ne2Bc5 (5) a3d6

(6) O-OBg4 (7) Qd3Nh5 (8) h3Bxe2 (9)Qxe2Nf4

(10)Qe1Nd4 (11)Bb3Nxh3+ (12)Kh2Qh4 (13) g3Nf3+

(14) Kg2Nxe1+ (15)Rxe1Qg4 (16) d3Bxf2 (17) Rh1Qxg3+

(18) Kf1Bd4 (19) e2Qg2+(20) Kd1Qxh1+ (21) Kd2Qg2+

(22) Ke1Ng1 (23) Nc3Bxc3+ (24) bxc3Qe2#0-1

[Event “Malmaison Castle”]
[Site “Malmaison Castle”]
Date 1804
[White “Napoleon I”]
[Black “Madame de Remusat”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “C41”]
Source: Chessbase

1.Nc3 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.e4 f5 4.h3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 Nc6 6.Nfg5 d5 7.Qh5+ g6 8.Qf3 Nh6 9.Nf6+ Ke7 10. Nxd5 Kd6 11. Ne4+ Kxd5 12. Bc4+ Kxc4 13. Qb3+ Kd4 14. Qd3# Napoleon 1-0 Madame de Remusat

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Tata Steel Chess Tournament – 15th January 2021 – 31st January 2021 – Image: Tata Steel FB
From Tata Steel’s FB page
Chess players are in general smart people. Just look at these boys.
Not necessarily the looks, but smart overall. I leave you with a question:
Where are the girls in this tournament?
Is it always just males playing in this tournament?
If you have the answer, please let me know.
Round 4
All photos by: © Jurriaan Hoefsmit – Tata Steel Chess Tournament 2021
Round 4
Jorden 1/2 and Magnus 1/2 in Round 4
This is the end position of a game I completed today.
I played white and I think I had a bit of luck on my side too. Usually, I prefer black as I have more wins with black.
Click on the link below to play through the game.

jaquie vs. Larkey4

This is the opening we played in our game.

I wish I had more time to play chess! Also, my dream is to play a GM! Does anyone know a GM?

Results – Round 3 and Round 4

https://tatasteelchess.com/standings/ This is the official website for you to follow the games and to view the standings.

Tata Steel Round 5 Results – from the site of Tata Steel
Standings after round 5
Chess tournaments take a lot of deep thinking.
One thing I like about chess players – they are ‘nice’ in games. Chess is a gentleman’s game.
Is it thinking or worry? Game 6
I like those cushions! (searching the internet….)

Jorden van Foreest commented on his game in round 6.

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Beth’s top 5 moves – from the movie: The Queen’s Gambit
This is the opening we played in my game below – see link – and it’s called: The Philidor’s Defence

When I was at school, I got the looks from boys as chess was always just seen as a boys’ game. Luckily, time has changed, however, there are still some of the opposite sex that still think this is true and sadly even some of the Chess Grand Masters. I will not elaborate on this as I already done so a few years ago on my blog. After all the media attention, this Grandmaster denied what he said, but we know what he said is what he meant. Sometimes, when I write my own poems, I do like to weave some chess into my poems – you might find some on my blog to read and spot the random reference to chess in a random poem.

This was one of my online games from a few years ago, which I really enjoyed. If you click the link below the image, you van view the game and play through the game by using the arrows. I played black in this game. This image shows the end position.

ChJOEY vs. Jaquie

I have watched this movie: The Queen’s Gambit and enjoyed it thoroughly. If you haven’t done so, you are missing out, even if you don’t know anything of chess, you will still enjoy it.

Beth Harmon – ~The Queen’s Gambit

The Queen’s Gambit – a Netflix
Music from the movie: The Queen’s Gambit

 

This chess opening is called: The Queen’s Gambit

 

This chess opening is called, The King’s Gambit.

 

The Final Position on the board in the Netflix Movie.

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sa

This is one of my own poems. It is a cento. A cento is a poem written using other author’s lines or passages. This ‘cento’ though has been written using my own poems. The poems I used are all from my Afrikaans poems. I do write English too, but as I said before, it’s just playing with words. I don’t try to be professional. I decided a few years ago to do my ‘bit’ for Afrikaans on the 14th August every year. Unfortunately, it didn’t happen last year and I couldn’t let another year go by without having one on this day! This is the history behind the 14th August.

The Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners (Afrikaans for “Society of Real Afrikaners”) was formed on 14 August 1875 in the town of Paarl by a group of Afrikaans speakers from the current Western Cape region. From 15 January 1876 the society published a journal in Afrikaans called Die Afrikaanse Patriot (“The Afrikaans Patriot”) as well as a number of books, including grammars, dictionaries, religious material and histories. Die Afrikaanse Patriot was succeeded in 1905 by today’s Paarl newspaper. You can read more about this Society on this link on the site of Wikipedia.

If you are Afrikaans,  I hope you enjoy these couple of lines.

seagold-

My siel op haelwit wolke

In gietende reën sypel my gedagtes: eindloos!
Ek stuur vir jou die goud
van sondeurdrenkte landskappe
in die galery van my stille gemoed.
My opgevoude gedagtes steek vas
en onderhou my geheue
wat onvermydelik verstrengel is
en soos gister
vind jy my siel op haelwit wolke;
my gedagtes wentel om die aura van my taal
en rol ragfyn ligstraaltjies voor my uit:
wat die tuimelende bergstilte
laat rol oor die dansende blou waters
na die holtes van my gedagtes.

==Nikita 14/08/2015 


Mantovani is one of my real big favourites. On this video you’ll find a whole library of his music to keep you company. I hope you enjoy!

If you are a regular reader of my blog, you would know that I do play chess myself too. I’ve blogged quite a few chess games in the past. This is one of my most recent chess games on chess.com Time is little to play rated chess games and I was tricked into this game, but managed to escape the worst. Rated games involve more concentration and I tend to play friendlies just for fun and I feel I can ‘escape’ or shut down from normal work and enjoy the game. 

chesscom
I like how I managed to checkmate my opponent, though he was very close to checkmate me! I played white in this game – not my favourite colour, as I discovered I play better games when I play black. If you are interested, please click here to play through the game. If you are a chess player yourself, please feel free to leave a comment and Dan, if you read here, you might want to analyse my game…hehe.

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chessmaster_giovanni_leonardo_di_bona
Image: Wikimedia

This painting is a great painting, read the explanation of Wikipedia.
Click HERE to play through the chess games of Di Bona on the site of chessgames.com. Di Bona was called ‘the wandering knight’.
Giovanni Leonardo di Bona or Giovanni Leonardo da Cutri (both given names can be seen also in the reversed order Leonardo Giovanni), known as Il Puttino (Italian Small Child) (1542–1587) was an early Italian chess master. Giovanni Leonardo was born in Cutro, Calabria. He studied law in Rome. In 1560, he lost a match to Ruy López in Rome. In 1566–1572, he travelled and played chess in Rome, Genoa, Marseille, Barcelona. He had played many times against Paolo Boi in Italy and they were regarded as being equal in their chess strength. Giovanni Leonardo di Bona won the first known international master tournament in the history of chess in Madrid in 1575, therefore becoming the strongest chess master of the time. After their success at the Court of Spain, Leonardo and Paolo Boi, both travelled, although separately, to Lisbon, where they tested their chess skill against Il Moro, the eminent chess champion of King Don Sebastian, of Portugal. Again, they both succeeded, first Leonardo, soon followed by Paolo Boi, in defeating Il Moro. And again the King was generous with his rewards. After this triumph, Giovanni Leonardo di Bona, having been called the wandering knight (Il Cavaliere errante) by King Don Sebastian, left Portugal to return to Italy and settle in Naples where he became the chess master for the Prince of Bisignano.

Source: Wikipedia

This game on the following link,[where I played black] is a more recent game, which I played in 2011. I usually like Knights more than Bishops and in this game you can see why. I would like to call this Knight ‘the wandering Knight‘ [as well] I love my Pawns too, they can be very powerful pieces on the board. Click HERE to play through the game.

chessgameknight

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b3218934567321

I’ve been looking at some of my games played a few years ago and just to post a game to go with these two games from chessgames, I’ve decided on this game HERE – for no particular reason. You can play through the game on the link. I played black.

chessendN

End position of my game

chessking-1

One of my very old games, played in 2006- I was black and you can see my rating – not that I was really bothered to improve my rating, time to really think about moves, doesn’t exist in my life of full time teaching. [hehe] I liked how I was chasing my fellow countryman around on the board, whilst he was in a really strong position early on in the game.

chessbishopattack

A game played in 2005 – and I like how I used my bishops here. My opponent resigned on this point.

chessking_1

In this game – where I played black – I was lucky. My comments on this game: a very interesting game I’d played in a long time – well, that was in 2006. I like the checkmate in this game. 

You can click HERE to play through the game.

In these next two chess games, you can see some bizarre chess openings…with a King… play through the first game on this link  on chessgames.

chessking01

Not that I think I’m the best chess player, but look at THIS GAME  game, not sure what he was trying.

chess-kingo

Have you seen The King and I?

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Indeed the name Prokofiev needs little introduction, as one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. However his connection to chess might be a little less obvious, even to the musically enlightened. As to David Oistrakh, he was one of the very greatest violinists, whose virtuosity ranked alongside Fritz Kreisler and Jasha Heifetz. Both of them were passionate chess players, though Prokofiev more than one would believe.
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev, born April 23, 1891, died March 5, 1953 was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor who mastered numerous musical genres and is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century, which include Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Among his best-known works are the 3rd Piano Concerto, the third and fifth symphonies, as well as composed family favourites, such as the ballet Romeo and Juliet – from which “Dance of the Knights” is taken – and Peter and the Wolf. Sergei Prokofiev fell in love with chess at an early age, and during his lifetime never lost his passion for the royal game, befriending chess greats such as Capablanca and Alekhine.The composer met Alekhine in his native Russia in 1900 during an international tournament held there. Alekhine was a member of the organizing committee and Prokofiev had volunteered to accommodate the guests and the players. As the years passed, their friendship solidified. He met Capablanca in January 1914 in Petersburg where the Cuban champion was playing a series of simultaneous games. Prokofiev tried his luck and even managed to win a game!

The game:
[Event “1914 Tournament”]
[Site “St. Petersburg, Russia”]
[Date “1914.05.16”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[Black “Sergei Prokofiev”]
[ECO “D02”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “86”]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 Bf5 4.Qb3 Nc6 5.Qxb7 Na5 6.Qa6 Nxc4
7.Nc3 e6 8.e4 dxe4 9.Bxc4 exf3 10.Qc6+ Nd7 11.g4 Bg6 12.Bg5
Be7 13.Bxe7 Kxe7 14.O-O-O Re8 15.h4 h5 16.gxh5 Bxh5 17.Nb5 Kf8
18.d5 Qf6 19.dxe6 Ne5 20.Qc5+ Kg8 21.exf7+ Bxf7 22.Bxf7+ Qxf7
23.Kb1 Rab8 24.Nxc7 Rbc8 25.Rc1 Re7 26.Qd6 Rexc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7
28.Qe6+ Kh8 29.a3 Qc2+ 30.Ka1 Nd3 31.Rb1 Nxf2 32.h5 Qc6 33.Qf5
Ne4 34.Qxf3 Nd2 35.Qxc6 Rxc6 36.Rd1 Rc2 37.Rg1 Rc5 38.Rg6 Rxh5
39.Ra6 Nb3+ 40.Ka2 Ra5 41.Rxa5 Nxa5 42.b4 g5 43.Kb2 g4 0-1
Another great combination: Chess and music! What’s missing is the poetry! The closest I could get was the poem by Robert Frost.  Please click HERE to read the entire article on Chessbase.

Fire and Ice – Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

You can read my entry on Dance of the knights  on this link. The music is also the theme music to The Apprentice.


A young Sergey Prokofiev with his inseparable board
and chess books. [Image: chessbase]


Prokofiev in his later years remained faithful to his true love [Image: chessbase]

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chess blind1

Through a search engine term about Visual Impaired chess players, I’ve decided [back in 2009!] to create an entry about Chess for Visually Impaired Chess players. You can also read about Cecil Vosloo, South Africa’s champion.


How Visually Impaired Play Chess The Chess Board of 64 squares has the following modifications:

  • All the Black squares are raised about 3-4 mm above the white squares. By feeling the squares, the player is able to determine whether the square is a black or a white one.
  • Each of the squares on the Board has a hole in the centre so that the pieces can be fixed in these holes.
  • Each of the pieces has a downward projection (nail) at the base, which fits into the hole in the squares on the Board, thereby fixing the piece securely on the board.
  • All the Black pieces have a pin fixed on their heads helping the player distinguish between a white and a black piece.

The players therefore, by feeling the raised or the lowered squares can figure out whether the piece is on a black or a white square. By feeling the shape of the piece, they can determine whether the piece is a Pawn, Rook, Bishop, Knight, Queen or King. The touch of the pin on the pieces helps the player from distinguishing a white piece from a black one. The player is therefore able to have a clear picture in his mind of the position on the Board. He is now ready to take on any opponent, sighted or otherwise. After making every move, the visually impaired person is required to announce the move aloud, so that his opponent comes to know of the move. Instead of writing the moves on a Score Sheet, the visually impaired player writes the moves in Braille or records the moves on a tape recorder.

A little while ago, – in 2009 to be honest! -I did a search on visually impaired chess players on the web, as someone found my blog through a search engine term linked to visually impaired chess players. I came across Cecil Vosloo, a visually impaired chess player from South Africa on a site where he left some details about himself. I contacted him and he’s sent me some more info about himself. Visually impaired people have always been closed to my heart. As a student, and later as a teacher, I worked with visually impaired children and met Mariette, a High School student, who loved chess. We played many games – during the evenings when I did study duty in their hostel and I was always amazed by her bubbly personality, despite her visual disability. She tried to remember the layout of the chess board and where every chess piece was after each move. She had to observe the board from my point of view and from hers! That must be quite difficult, as you need to remember where both players pieces are and what your opponent tries to do and what you want to do! cecil-vosloo-braille-chess

On the site where I found Cicel, this was his personal message: My name is Cicel Vosloo. Born and bred on a farm, my dream was to become a farmer. This wasn’t to be though, because, whilst fighting a neighbour’s fire, my face was was terribly burnt, resulting in the loss of my sight. My initial anger gave way to the realisation that God provided me with a challenge, that, with His support I would be able to meet. Whilst attending a college for the blind, I started playing chess. In 2007 I won the national chess competition, which gave me a new lease on life.Currently I am ranked the number two South African Braille Chess Player and am honoured to be invited to represent South Africa in the Braille Chess Olympiad, an international event, in Greece in October 2008.

chess blind2

Via email Cecil sent me the following in October 2009:

Well, where do I start? I like the outdoors, BBQ’s and South Africa’s sunny weather. For me personally, I enjoy chess very much. I had been playing blind cricket for about three years, for the Gauteng club, but due to all sorts of interests, I’ve decided to quit. I had been playing chess since the beginning of the 2000’s and it came as an amazing surprise as how much you can actually learn from chess, how many friends you make and the respect you are treated with. It is not always easy to get around to get to clubs, and then of course the transport problem when you need to play tournaments far from home. It was my first time at an Olympiad in 2008, it was mind blowing -the tricks the guys pull for a win, amazing, but of course all in the rules. South Africa is far behind the rest of the world when it comes to blind chess.

Since Greece I played in 6 tournaments: January – Piet Roberts Open – 3.5/6 sighted March – Gauteng Open – second April – Top Eight – forth June – Kolonade – first June – Louis Braille Open – second August – SA Nationals – third.

I did contact Cecil again, as this entry got ‘lost’ as one of my 100+ drafts! So Cecil has now updated me with more info about him and his chess whereabouts. braille

July 2011 update: In 2010 I played in the sighted S.A. Open, got four wins, two draws out of nine games. In 2011 I won our blind Top Eight tournament. I won the Gauteng Open and also took part in the Commonwealth Chess Tournament which was recently held in South Africa. I got 5 points out of 11, it was a very tough tournament, 699 players took part. It was a great experience and I’m now working on getting into the team for next years Braille Olympiad. Next month is our blind S.A. tournament and I’m aiming to do well there too.

blind-chess-

Update 27/7/2011 from Rista: Chess South Africa: SA Open 2010 4 wins, 2 draws out of 9 rounds, which was stunning. He was the only blind player in this tournament. SA Braille Closed – [Top 8] 2011 – Cicel scored 6 out of 7, he won 5 games, 2 draws. Gauteng Braille Open – Again Champion! Commonwealth and SA Open 2011 – Cicel was awesome in this tough tourney. He won the first prize for Visually Impaired players. The Braille SA Championship is 13 – 14 Aug. Cicel is a favourite to win. The Top 8 will get invited next year April to the closed championship where a decision will be made about who to present South Africa internationally and they will get to go to India. Click HERE for the results of the Braille tournament where you can see Cecil’s photo as the Champion.

Chess games I played recently [not Cecil!]. These chess games are really nothing to get excited about. The only reason why I get excited about it is because it is  of my less good games – especially the game on the first link- and I also put in a lot of conditional moves in this game as my opponent was one of those very slow moverschesschat, whilst I wanted to finish the game in real time…very impatient me. [lol] I got near to the end very excited, as I put 6 complete moves in as conditional moves [just out of frustration to get the game done!] and when I logged back on, it was all done. You will see how many pieces I offered and also how unnecessary I lost my one knight! I played black and the Philidors defence as opening in this game. I offered many pieces near to the end as I knew it would be a win for me. Have fun playing through it! Click HERE to play through the second game I played. Click HERE to play through the first game against this same player [links will open in a new window]. In this game I was more focused too and played – as in many other games – the Kings Pawn opening. The last move – Qb7+ isn’t active in the pgn-viewer, although you will see the move [for some reason it prefers to stay inactive].

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http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1233404

On one of the chess sites, I’m busy playing a tournament and this particular player sent me the above link on chessgames, to highlight a ‘better’ move for one of the moves I’ve made. When looking at the game, I realised that our game was almost this game, in particular the first few moves. I felt sort of ‘thrilled’ by the idea of playing the start of Morphy’s famous game called: ‘Night at the Opera’. The moves in blue are the first moves of our game -I played white- and you can compare it with Morphy’s game in this entry.[maybe, if I didn’t castle, I could have had move 9 with move 7 – which was Morphy’s move – he castled move 12.] I hope you like Dolannes Melody by Jean-Claude Borelly, you can listen to it at the bottom of this post.

1. e4 e 5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Bg4 4. dxe5 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 dxe5 6. Bc4 f6 7. 0-0 Ne7
8. Rd1 Qc8 9. Qb3 c6

In 1858 the Duke of Brunswick and Count Isouard invited the American master Paul Morphy to the Paris Opera to watch The Barber of Serville, then asked their guest to play chess with them. Morphy was more interested in watching the opera, but could not courteously refuse.

Morphy played white, while Brunswick and Isouard consulted on black. He took his opponents apart in 17 moves, enabling him to watch the rest of the show without distraction, and incidentally proving that teaming two mediocre players does not double their talents.

This game is one of the best known in chess, exemplifying as it does the advantages of quick development over the pursuit of minor advantages. The game features a queen sacrifice that leads directly to mate.

The score of the game follows:

Paul Morphy vs Duke of Brunswick & Count Isouard, Paris Opera House, 1858. Philidor’s Defense.

Paul Morphy “The Pride and Sorrow of Chess,” was an American chess player. He is considered to have been the greatest chess master of his era and an unofficial World Chess Champion. He was also one of the first chess prodigies in the modern rules of chess era.

The “Opera game” – a casual game against inexperienced opponents, but at the same time one of the clearest and most beautiful attacking games ever. Often used by chess teachers to demonstrate how to use time, develop pieces and generate threats.

While most of the audience was following the performance of The Barber of Seville, Paul Morphy was busy at the chessboard, facing noble opposition. His opponents, working together, played well enough for a while, but they allowed Morphy to set two deadly pins.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Bg4 4. d x e5 B x f3 5. Q x f3 d x e5 6. Bc4 Nf6
7. Qb3 Qe7 8. Nc3 c6 9. Bg5 b5 10. N x b5 c x b5 11. B x b5 + Nbd7
12. O-O-O Rd8 13. R x d7 R x d7 14. Rd1 Qe6 15. B x d7 + N x d7
16. Qb8 + N x b8 17. Rd8 mate

These two images found on google and edited it slightly – beautiful poster – the second image.

I spoilt myself the last few days with a few chess games and even a few tournaments, but work is calling again! The following two games were played against the same opponent – you will notice in both games, my Knights were used – in conjunction with the Queen – to checkmate my opponent. I always prefer to save my Knights – I will even sacrifice my Bishops in order to keep my Knights for the reason as in these games and also for their tricky moves.

1. e4 e5 2. d4 Bd6 3. d5 h6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 d6 8. Be3 Bg4 9. h3 Bxf3 10. gxf3 a6 11. f4 Nxe4 12. c4 f5 13. Rb1 Nc3 14. Qh5+ Ke7 15. Rxb7 Qc8 16. Rb3 Ne4 17. Qh4+ Nf6 18. Rg1 Rg8 19. f3 Kf8 20. fxe5 dxe5 21. Bc5+ Kf7 22. Bd3 Nbd7 23. Bb4 c5 24. Bxf5 cxb4 25. Bg6+ Kf8 26. Rxb4 a5 27. Rb3 Nc5 28. Re3 Qb8 29. Kf2 Ra7 30. f4 e4 31. Kg2 Qb2 32. Qf2 Qa2 33. d6 Qxc4 34. c3 Rb7 35. f5 Nd3 36. Qe2 Rb2 37. Kf1 Rxe2 38. Kxe2 Nf4+ 39. Kf2 Nd3+ 40. Ke2 Qxc3 41. Rxe4 Nxe4 42. d7 Qd2+ 43. Kf3 Ng5+ 44. Kg3 Qe3+ 45. Kg2 Ke7 46. Rb1 Qxh3+ 47. Kg1 Nf3+

1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 Nf6  3. Bf4 Na6  4. Be5 Bf5  5. Bxf6 exf6  6. e3 Qd7  7. Bxa6 b6
8. Bb7 Rb8  9. Ba6 Bd6  10. a3 O-O  11. h3 h6  12. Nge2 Rfe8  13. Bd3 g6  14. Bxf5 Qxf5  15. O-O Rxe3  16. fxe3 Qe6  17. Qd2 Re8  18. Rf3 c6  19. Raf1 c5 20. Rxf6 Qd7  21. Rxf7 Qxf7  22. Rxf7 Kxf7  23. e4 dxe4  24. d5 e3  25. Qe1 a6 26. Qh4 h5  27. Qg5 Re5  28. Qh6 b5  29. Qh7+ Kf8  30. Qxg6 Be7  31. d6 Bd8 32. d7 Bc7  33. Qf6+ Kg8  34. d8=Q+ Bxd8  35. Qxd8+ Kg7  36. Qc7+ Kf6
37. Qd6+ Kf5  38. Qxa6 b4  39. axb4 cxb4  40. Nb5 Ke4  41. Nd6+ Kd5                42. b3 Re6  43. Qd3+ Ke5  44. Qd4+
Dolannes Melody by Jean-Claude Borelly

And for the record: It was Republic Day

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It is time to enter for the South African Open 2010. Click the image for the Official website of the organisers: Ramlodi. The link is also on my blog’s side bar. Last year we had 3 GM’s to play in this tournament online from different continents and it was the first Fide tournament to be played online. You can visit the official website or follow some of the links here. Games/photos will be followed and blogged here as results will become available during the tournament.
Please click
here for the ONLINE entry form. [Links will open in a new window] NON-Citizens of South Africa: Click click here to pay via PayPal or visit the Official site for the same link.
 


The Venue: Tswane University of Technology [Pretoria]

Venue: Inside [Theunis Bester Hall] – see more pics on the Official site.


Schedule SA Open 2010 or click on this PDF-link to download the schedule.
SA Open 2010 Schedule in PDF

History of the South Africa Chess Open Championships
The Cape Town Chess Club is the oldest chess club in the country, boasting an un-interruped existence since its foundation in 1885! However, it is almost certainly not the first club that was formed. Besides the reference above to a club which met in Cape Town in 1847, the Grahamstown Journal of 29 December 1969 reports the result of a match of three games played by correspondence that year between Amateur Chess Club of Port Elizabeth and the Grahamstown Chess Club. Grahamstown won all three games.
The 1st SA Championship, Cape Town 1892
At the Cape Town Chess Club’s 7th Annual General Meeting in March 1892, J.H. Clark, one of the club’s most prominent member introduced a proposal that a general chess tournament, open to all chess players in South Africa, be held in Cape Town under the auspices of the Cape Town Chess
Club. This proposal was received with enthusiasm and the club set about organising the tournament. The Metropolitan Hall in Burg Street was the venue. The tournament was opened by the club’s President, the Bishop of Cape Town, and others on the platform were General Cameron, officer commanding the local British forces. Prize money offered amounted to £25. The rate of play was 25 moves per hour, with sessions of four hours duration, but few games lasted that long. Eleven players were accepted for the Championship proper and ten played in the Minor tournament, both being round-robins. The tournament was to last six days, during which the contestants had to play 10 games. This heavy schedule was quite acceptable to all, it seems. Rivett and Roberts each scored 9½ out of 10. They then contested two games to break the tie, the first beginning at 4pm on the sixth day of the tournament. Roberts won this and at 7:30pm that same day the second game commenced. Rivett was successful so the title was shared.

The 2nd SA Championship, Cape Town 1897
After a lapse of five years the Cape Town Chess Club again took the initiative and staged the second SA Championship in 1897. The committee has budgeted for a total expenditure of £200 and it is noteworthy that the full amount was subscribed by donors, among whom was President Steyn of Orange Free State, who gave £5. The Prizes in the Championship were £30, £20, £10 and £5, with a further £10 for consolation prizes. For the Minor tournament, which attracted a field of 11, £25 was
allocated for prizes. The tournament was in fact a triumph for the Cape Town players, for after Roberts came Cameron
with 9 points and then another club representative Friedman was tied with Kummel for third and fourth placings, each scoring 8½.
The 3rd SA Championship, Durban 1899
The 4th SA Championship, Johannesburg 1903
The 5th SA Championship, Cape Town 1906

Source: Ramlodi.co.za

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Anand…my favourite – image: Official site

 

Schedule

See the image/link to the Official site on my blog’s sidebar [top right]. The link will open in a new window.

Round 1: Topalov vs Anand –  move 19 [click on images for a larger view]

Round 1 move 23

Move 25

Round 1 move 29 – big trouble – Anand has resigned this game

Topalov – 1 Anand – 0

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC2010”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.24”]
[Round “1.22”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “D87”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “59”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Na5 11. Bd3 b6 12. Qd2 e5 13. Bh6 cxd4 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. cxd4 exd4 16. Rac1 Qd6 17. f4 f6 18. f5 Qe5 19. Nf4 g5 20. Nh5+ Kg8 21. h4 h6 22. hxg5 hxg5 23. Rf3 Kf7 24. Nxf6 Kxf6 25. Rh3 Rg8 26. Rh6+ Kf7 27. Rh7+Ke8 28. Rcc7 Kd8 29. Bb5 Qxe4 30. Rxc8+ 1-0

Game 2 Image: Chessdom
ROUND 2 – Sunday 25th April: Anand 1-Topalov 0

Anand vs Topalov Round 2 move 14

Round 2 move 16

Round 2 move 19

Round 2 move 28

Round 2 move 32

Round 2 move 37

Round 2: End position

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC2010 game_2”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.??”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “85”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8. Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bd2 Nd5 11. Rc1 Nd7 12. Nd3 Ba7 13. Ba5 Qe7 14. Qb3 Rb8 15. Qa3 Qxa3 16. bxa3 N7f6 17. Nce5 Re8 18. Rc2 b6 19. Bd2 Bb7 20. Rfc1 Rbd8 21. f4 Bb8 22. a4 a5 23. Nc6 Bxc6 24. Rxc6 h5 25. R1c4 Ne3 26. Bxe3 dxe3 27. Bf3 g6 28. Rxb6 Ba7 29. Rb3 Rd4 30. Rc7 Bb8 31. Rc5 Bd6 32. Rxa5 Rc8 33.Kg2 Rc2 34. a3 Ra2 35. Nb4 Bxb4 36. axb4 Nd5 37. b5 Raxa4 38. Rxa4 Rxa4 39. Bxd5 exd5 40. b6 Ra8 41. b7 Rb8 42. Kf3 d4 43. Ke4 1-0

 Anand 1-Topalov 0

Anand Image: Chessdom


Image: Chessdom

Game 3 Topalov vs Anand – Move 26

Game 3 Final Position

Game 3: Topalov 1/2 – Anand 1/2

Results after round 3: Anand 1 1/2   –   Topalov  1 1/2

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_3”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.27”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “D17”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[BlackElo “2787”]
[PlyCount “91”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BTN”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4 Bg6
9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14. Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h6 16. Ke2 Bd6 17. h5 Bh7 18. a5 Ke7 19. Na4 f6 20. b4 Rgc8 21. Bc5 Bxc5 22. bxc5 Rc7 23. Nb6 Rd8 24. Nxd7 Rdxd7 25. Bd3 Bg8 26. c6 Rd6 27. cxb7 Rxb7 28. Rc3 Bf7 29. Ke3 Be8 30. g4 e5 31. Rhc1 Bd7 32. Rc5 Bb5 33. Bxb5 axb5 34. Rb1 b4 35. Rb3 Ra6 36. Kd3 Rba7 37. Rxb4 Rxa5 38. Rxa5 Rxa5 39. Rb7+ Kf8 40. Ke2 Ra2+ 41. Ke3 Ra3+ 42. Kf2 Ra2+ 43. Ke3 Ra3+ 44. Kf2 Ra2+ 45. Ke3 Ra3+ 46. Kf2 1/2-1/2


Image: Chessdom

Game 4

Game 4 move 25

Anand 1 – Topalov 0

Game 4: Final Position – Anand 1 – Topalov 0

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_4”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.28”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “63”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 a5 7. Qc2 Bxd2+ 8.
Qxd2 c6 9. a4 b5 10. Na3 Bd7 11. Ne5 Nd5 12. e4 Nb4 13. O-O O-O 14. Rfd1 Be8 15. d5 Qd6 16. Ng4 Qc5 17. Ne3 N8a6 18. dxc6 bxa4 19. Naxc4 Bxc6 20. Rac1 h6 21. Nd6 Qa7 22. Ng4 Rad8 23. Nxh6+ gxh6 24. Qxh6 f6 25. e5 Bxg2 26. exf6 Rxd6 27. Rxd6 Be4 28. Rxe6 Nd3 29. Rc2 Qh7 30. f7+ Qxf7 31. Rxe4 Qf5 32. Re7 1-0

Game 4 – Anand vs Topalov

Anand – Game 4 -28th April
Game 4: Anand leads by one point after the second Catalan opening in the match.

The fourth game of the FIDE World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand of India and Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria saw another Catalan opening on the board. This is the first opening that was played twice in the match, the players are obviously willing to have a theoretical discussion. Topalov was the one to deviate from the second game, as early as on move 5, when he played the sharper Bb4+ instead of a6.

Similar to the earlier Catalan game, Black clutched onto the extra pawn while White tried to take advantage of his faster pieces’ development. Anand aggressively advanced in the center to break opponent’s pawn formation and open up the files and diagonals. At the same time, Topalov was carefully clearing the queenside in order to reduce the positional pressure.

The game appeared to be taking a normal course but then Anand’s sudden Knight movement (e3-g4) caught Topalov without guard and on the wrong foot. Not hesitating much, Anand knocked a piece sacrifice on h6 and picked a strong attack against the Black King. Still precision was needed in carrying out the assault, but Anand never blinked and found the crushing 25. e5!

Topalov continued for a few moves more, but resigned at the imminent danger of a mate. Anand takes the lead in the match 2,5-1,5, tomorrow is a rest day and the games continue on Friday at 15:00 Source: Official Site

Anand crushes Topalov in fourth game

The fourth game of the World chess championship match in Sofia saw Viswanathan Anand’s best performance to date with a slashing attack against challenger Veselin Topalov.

“Anand really played brilliantly today,” said commentator Zurab Azmaiparashvili, having watched the World champion sacrifice a pawn, then a knight and then a bishop to create a winning assault against

Topalov’s exposed king.

Anand was pleased with his performance. “It was a very complex position with a lot of tension on the queenside,” said Anand. “I thought (my 23rd move) was clinching it but you can’t be 100 per cent sure.”

Anand explained that in a key variation he was prepared to give away both his rooks as well to ensure a checkmate: “Once I saw that I knew I was winning.”

Poor start
After a poor start, Anand, 40, has taken the lead for the first time in the €2 million match and the Bulgarian challenger is looking shaky. “I though I had a decent position,” said Topalov, “but if I was able to answer so simply what went wrong then the result might have been different.

“Certainly my (20th move) was especially bad.”

Playing with white pieces, Anand used the Catalan Opening which had brought him success in game two but Topalov, 35, defended differently this time. Soon Anand sacrificed a pawn and Topalov needed no invitation to grab the material and attempt to hang on to it.

Anand’s unorthodox 10th move, moving a knight to the edge of the board, appeared to be new. However, a member of Team Anand, computer expert Eric van Reem, explained that Anand was following an earlier game, a precedent apparently unknown to Topalov who began thinking hard for the first time in the game.

Excellent compensation
Soon it became clear that Anand had excellent compensation for his pawn when the apparently offside knight moved to the centre, stymieing Topalov’s freedom of movement. Although the position was highly unbalanced — the type of game at which Topalov usually excels — Anand’s speed of play indicated that he had checked the ideas at home with his team and had everything under control.

Anand was coy when asked if the sacrifices were prepared with his team. “I won’t be able to tell you that until the match is over,” said Anand, who has managed to keep the identity of some of his helpers secret as well.

On the 23rd move, after cogitating for only five minutes, Anand sacrificed a knight and Topalov immediately found his king under massive fire. Another sacrifice followed and Topalov was soon defenceless. The challenger resigned after 32 moves and three-and-a-half hours’ play.

Anand leads Topalov 2.5-1.5 with eight games remaining after Wednesday’s encounter. The fifth game, with Topalov holding the first move, will be played on Friday starting at 5.30 p.m. IST. Source:
http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/article414219.ece
GAME 5 – 30th April -Topalov vs Anand 1/2

Bulgaria Chess Master Topalov Hopes to Crush Anand’s Defense

Click on the image for a clear view -the article continues here:

“We hope to have finally figured out the secret of Anand’s defense. We have five people on our team working with top notch computers on this task, and we hope to see results today,” Danailov explained.

The first move of the fifth game of the Sofia World Chess Title Match was made Friday by Nobel Prize winning professor of economics Robert Mundell, known as “the father of the euro”.

Danailov said Topalov’s team met Professor Mundell during a tournament in China which was won by the Bulgarian chess master.

“I wanted to invite Professor Mundell as a guest during the last M-Tel Masters tournament but he was busy then. This time, however, he managed to find time to be our guest,” Danailov explained.

“It is a pleasure for me to be here. I have come as an economist and a fan of chess,” said the Nobel Prize laureate expressing his happiness to be present at the event.

Source: novinite.com

Game 5 move 17

Game 5 move 32

Game 5 move 39

Game 5 move 42 – Topalov vs Anand 1/2

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_5”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.04.30”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Topalov, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “D17”]
[WhiteElo “2805”]
[BlackElo “2787”]
[PlyCount “87”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 c5 8. e4 Bg6
9. Be3 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Qxd4 11. Bxd4 Nfd7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bxc4 a6 14. Rc1 Rg8 15. h4 h5 16. Ne2 Bd6 17. Be3 Ne5 18. Nf4 Rc8 19. Bb3 Rxc1+ 20. Bxc1 Ke7 21. Ke2 Rc8 22. Bd2 f6 23. Nxg6+ Nxg6 24. g3 Ne5 25. f4 Nc6 26. Bc3 Bb4 27. Bxb4+ Nxb4 28. Rd1 Nc6 29. Rd2 g5 30. Kf2 g4 31. Rc2 Rd8 32. Ke3 Rd6 33. Rc5 Nb4 34. Rc7+ Kd8 35. Rc3 Ke7 36. e5 Rd7 37. exf6+ Kxf6 38. Ke2 Nc6 39. Ke1 Nd4 40. Bd1 a5 41. Rc5 Nf5 42. Rc3 Nd4 43. Rc5 Nf5 44. Rc3 1/2-1/2

News/comments from the Official site:

After the second rest day, the FIDE World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand of India and Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria continued today with game five in which Topalov played with White pieces.

The first symbolic move were made by the “father of the euro” professor Robert Mundell. The President of Bulgaria Mr. Georgi Parvanov visited the match.

The opening was replay of game three in which Anand used the Slav defence and comfortably held a draw. The expectation were that Topalov will find an improvement in the variation and fight for opening advantage.

But it was Anand who first diverted from the earlier game by moving 15…h5 instead of 15…h6. Topalov continued with the logical 16. Ne2 having in mind Nf4, to exploit the newly created situation with Black pawn on h5. Anand established strong Knight outpost on e5 and traded off a pair of Rooks to reduce White’s chances of gaining initiative.

After further exchange of minor pieces, an endgame with Rook and Bishop versus Rook and Knight has arisen. Anand’s 29…g5 initiated changes in the pawn structure, which allowed him to solve one issue and concentrate on pieces’ play.

Black Knight gradually suppressed White Bishop, which eventually landed on the backward d1-square. Right after the time-control, Topalov offered moves repetition before the situation goes out of the hand. Or perhaps it was a psychological move, attempting to test Anand’s resolve to play for a win, in case of which White would also have chances for full point.

But Anand needed no risk and accepted the threefold repetition. Draw signed on move 44. The current score is 3-2 in favour of Anand who tomorrow plays with White pieces. Live coverage on the official website starting at 14:45 local time.

Anand blacks out Topalov’s ambitions

Viswanathan Anand has retained his narrow lead over Veselin Topalov with a solid draw in the fifth game of the Indian’s world title defence in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Anand, playing black for the third time in the match, repeated the Slav opening which had neutralised Topalov’s ambitions in game three, and also came armed with a new 15th move.

Soon afterwards, as Anand was considering his 17th move, the playing hall — and indeed the entire Military Club — was plunged into darkness by a power blackout. The game timers were stopped by the arbiter but both players remained firmly in their seats, analysing in the dark.

Ten minutes later, emergency power provided some flickering light on the stage and five minutes later the light was good enough for the game to resume.

“I don’t know what would have happened if the lights had not gone on for an hour or more,” admitted Anand. “I don’t know what the rules are for such a situation.”

However, while play continued, the video screen above the players, relaying the game to the audience in the Military Club and to hundreds of thousands of viewers on the internet, remained inoperable. Audible protests from some of the frustrated spectators in the theatre were quickly muted by security guards and five minutes later normal broadcasting of the moves resumed.

Both players reacted calmly to the unexpected interruption, although Anand spent some time re-orientating himself with the position before he made his next move.

“It is very easy to make a mistake after a break in concentration like this,” said Anand, “so I decided to invest an extra ten minutes just to be sure.”

Once again Anand’s opening preparation proved superior to that of his Bulgarian challenger. “I missed Anand’s [22nd move],” confessed Topalov. “It was very strong. I will need to be more precise in future games.”

With other strong pawn moves Anand soon solved all his problems. “I managed to stabilise the position,” explained Anand, “after which I have nothing to complain about.”

Before long Topalov found himself staring at an equal endgame which offered no chances for a win to either player. After four hours play, both players could find nothing better than to repeat moves and a draw was agreed after 44 moves.

The draw was a perfectly satisfactory result for Anand as he retains a 3-2 lead in the best-of-12 contest and will hold the advantage of the first move, equivalent to the serve in tennis, in the next two games.

Anand refused, however, to express any comment on the state of the match so far, saying “I’m just taking it game by game.”

The sixth game will be played on May 1 starting at 17.30 IST. Source:
http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/article418770.ece
 

Anand vs Topalov…game 6

ANAND vs TOPALOV Game 6

Anand vs Topalov game 6 move 7 – click on images for a larger view

Game 6 move 27

Game 6 move 35

Game 6 move 48

Game 6 End position – Anand 1/2 Topalov 1/2

Game 6

[Event “Sofia BUL, WCC 2010 game_6”]
[Site “Sofia BUL”]
[Date “2010.05.01”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Anand, V.”]
[Black “Topalov, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “E04”]
[WhiteElo “2787”]
[BlackElo “2805”]
[PlyCount “116”]
[EventDate “2010.04.24”]
[EventType “match”]
[EventRounds “12”]
[EventCountry “BUL”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 a6 6. Ne5 c5 7. Na3 cxd4 8. Naxc4 Bc5 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nd3 Ba7 13. Qa4 Nc6 14. Rac1 e5 15. Bxc6 b5 16. Qc2 Qxc6 17. Ncxe5 Qe4 18. Qc6 Bb7 19. Qxe4 Bxe4 20. Rc2 Rfe8 21. Rfc1 f6 22. Nd7 Bf5 23. N7c5 Bb6 24. Nb7 Bd7 25. Nf4 Rab8 26. Nd6 Re5 27. Nc8 Ba5 28. Nd3 Re8 29. Na7 Bb6 30. Nc6 Rb7 31. Ncb4 a5 32. Nd5 a4 33. Nxb6 Rxb6 34. Nc5 Bf5 35. Rd2 Rc6 36. b4 axb3 37. axb3 b4 38. Rxd4 Rxe2 39. Rxb4 Bh3 40. Rbc4 Rd6 41. Re4 Rb2 42. Ree1 Rdd2 43. Ne4 Rd4 44. Nc5 Rdd2 45. Ne4 Rd3 46. Rb1 Rdxb3 47. Nd2 Rb4 48. f3 g5 49. Rxb2 Rxb2 50. Rd1 Kf7 51. Kf2 h5 52. Ke3 Rc2 53. Ra1 Kg6 54. Ra6 Bf5 55. Rd6 Rc3+ 56. Kf2 Rc2 57. Ke3 Rc3+ 58. Kf2 Rc2 1/2-1/2

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Benjamin Franklin playing chess…’And lastly, we learn by chess the habit of not being discouraged by present bad appearances in the state of our affairs; the habit of hoping for a favorable chance, and that of preserving in the search of resources.’ -Benjamin Franklin, ‘The Morals of Chess’

 

I like playing chess on  chesscube for a couple of reasons…I always find someone to play a quick realtime game -my time is little and I’m not anymore interested in playing games going on for ages – I like the interface and the colours. This first game was played today and I was just on time to win this game…as I’m always in a hurry…I try to think fast, move fast – and sometimes end up with fast blunders too. My opponent spent 7 minutes before he decided to sacrifice his Queen -and in the process I did the same and won his Bishop. I have the pgn-file for you to follow if interested.

Click on the image for a clearer view

B01 -Scandinavian (center counter) 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 4. Bc4 e6 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. d3 h6 7. O-O Bc6 8. Bf4 Nf6 9. Nb5 Bxb5 10. Bxb5+ c6 11. Bc4 Nbd7 12. a3 Bc5 13. b4 Bb6 14. Ne5 O-O 15. Nxd7 Qxd7 16. Be5 Bd4 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Rb1 Bd4 19. Qg4 Rad8 20. Kh1 Qd6 21. f4 a6 22. f5 Bb6 23. fxe6 Bc7 24. g3 Kh8 25. exf7 b5 26. Bb3 c5 27. bxc5 Qc6+ 28. Kg1 Qxc5+ 29. Kg2 a5 30. Rf5 Qc6+ 31. Kh3 a4 32. Qe4 Qxe4 33. dxe4 axb3 34. cxb3 Bd6 35. b4 Bc7 36. e5 Rd3 37. e6 Bd6 38. Re1 Be7 39. Ree5 Rxa3 40. Rxb5 Ra7 41. Rbd5 Bf6 42. b5 Rb7 43. Rd1 Be7 44. Rd7 Rb6 45. Rxe7 g6 46. Re8 Kg7 47. Rf1 Rxe6 48. Rxf8 Rf6 49. Rxf6 Kxf6 50. b6 Ke7 51. b7 Kxf8 52. b8=Q+ Kxf7 53. Qc7+ Kf6 54. Qd6+ Kf7 55. Qd5+ Kf6 56. Qd6+ Kf7 57. Qe5 g5 58. Qf5+ Kg7 59. Qe6 Kf8 0-1

image:animalartistry.co.uk

Mmmm…I always keep my Knights as long as I can…wonder if you can spot in this next game why…I have some of the colours of chesscube on this image too. Very visual for someone like me…This player resigned the game.

Click on the image for a clearer view

C41 – Philidor’s Defence -1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  d6 3. Nc3  Bg4 4. Bb5+  c6 5. Bc4  Bxf3 6. Qxf3  Qe7 7. d3  h6 8. O-O  Nd7 9. b4  Ngf6 10. b5  c5 11. Nd5  Qd8 12. Nxf6+  Nxf6 13. Bd5  Rb8 14. c4  Be7 15. Rb1  O-O 16. a4  b6 17. Bd2  Ne8 18. Ra1  Bf6 19. a5  Kh8 20. Bc6  Nc7 21. axb6  axb6 22. Qf5  Ne6 23. Bd5  Nd4 24. Qg4  Nb3 25. Ra2  Nd4 26. Bc3  Nb3 27. Bc6  Be7 28. f4  f6 29. fxe5  dxe5 30. Ra3  Nd4 31. Qd7  Qxd7 32. Bxd7  Rbd8 33. Ra7  Ne2+ 34. Kh1  Nxc3 35. Bf5  Bd6 36. Rb7  Ne2 37. Rxb6  Nf4 38. Rf3  Bc7 39. Rc6  Bd6 40. g3  Ne2 41. b6  Nd4 42. Rxd6  Rxd6 43. Rf1  Rxb6  0-1

Don’t forget! Anand-vs-Topalov – Sofia 21st April

http://www.anand-topalov.com/

Image: Official site…Playing Hall – Central Military Club, Sofia

Schedule: Anand vs Topalov – click on the image for a larger view

The scene where Anand and Topalov will play – image: chessdom

Here’s a song from Elton John to enjoy…Your Song

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Valencia Karpov Kasparov 
valencia

Image: Chessbase


Image: wikimedia –
The  World Chess Championship 1984 was a match between challenger Garry Kasparov and defending champion Anatoly Karpov. After 5 months and 48 games, the match was eventually abandoned in controversial circumstances with Karpov leading five wins to three (with 40 draws), and replayed in the World Chess Championship 1985.


Image: wikimedia – The Word CC 1985
The 1985 World Chess Championship was played between Anatoly Karpov and Garry Kasparov in Moscow from September 3 to November 9, 1985. Kasparov won. The match was played as the best of 24 games. If it ended 12-12, Karpov would retain his title.

Kasparov Karpov 2009

2009 – September – and the word biggest Chess Engines meet again…25 years on. Follow their games live on the top link on my blog’s side bar or click HERE to follow their games live. [the best link to follow their games live is the next link at the bottom of this entry…the site is chessok.com]

Click on this link to play through their blitz-games. The link will open in a new window.

 http://www.chessok.com/broadcast/?key=KKblitz.pgn&game=0

Image: Chessbase

Game 1

Results round 1 – Kasparov vs Karpov — 1-0

round 1 move 16

Game 1 – move 16 = please click on images for a clear view

Game 2

Game 2 – Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0 [site:chessok.com]
Please click here to play through the games interactively on chessok.

Game 2 Kasparov vs Karpov

Game 2  Kasparov, Garry  —  Karpov, Anatoly  1-0  Défense Semi-Slave

Game 3 Karpov vs Kasparov

Game 3  Karpov, Anatoly  —  Kasparov, Garry  1-0  -Gruenfeld 3.g3

Game 4 Kasparov vs karpov

Game 4  Kasparov, Garry  —  Karpov, Anatoly 1-0  Défense Semi-Slave

Karpov vs Kasparov

KK

chess men

Game 1

[White “Karpov”]
[Black “Kasparov”]
[WhiteElo “2644”]
[BlackElo “2812”]
[Result “0-1”]
[GameID “479”]
[UniqID “446210”]
[WhiteClock “0:00:00”]
[BlackClock “0:08:33”]
[Stamp “509”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nb6 7. Ne2 c5 8.
d5 O-O 9. O-O e6 10. Nbc3 Na6 11. h3 exd5 12. exd5 Nc4 13. b3 Nd6 14. Bf4
b6 15. Qd2 Bb7 16. Rad1 Nc7 17. g4 Qd7 18. a4 f5 19. g5 Rad8 20. Bg3 f4 21.Nxf4 Nf5 22. Nb5 Nxb5 23. axb5 Nd4 24. Ne6 0-1

KasparovKarpov

Chess is a game that rarely draws a massive amount of attention from the global public, but a rematch between Kasparov and Karpov reminds us that it throws up the occasional great rivalry.

When Garry Kasparov challenged Anatoly Karpov in 1984 for the chess world championship, it was the beginning of a titanic struggle.

The contest lasted five months and featured a series of successive draws of 17 and 15 games. It was controversially ended by the chess authorities over fears for the health of the players, both of whom had lost weight during the struggle. Kasparov had been resurgent at the end, although Karpov still held a lead.

In 1985, Kasparov beat Karpov for the title. They played for it again in 1986 and again Kasparov won. In 1987, Kasparov was one down going into the final game, but recovered to tie the series and therefore retain his crown.

It was a great chess rivalry, but it was more than that to the watching public and pundits.

“It was very symbolic of what was happening to the Soviet Union,” says grandmaster Raymond Keene, chess correspondent for the Times. “It was obvious the USSR was going through a period of great turmoil.”

And the rivalry was perfect in pitching a brilliant, brooding outsider against the Soviet establishment’s main man.

“Kasparov was a southerner, half-Jewish, half-Armenian, much younger, in the vanguard of a change, taking on the golden boy of the old Soviet Union,” says Keene.

Keene organised the London matches of the third series between the players in 1985, which took place both in the UK and Leningrad. He was surprised by the stark disparity between the Soviet and the Western ways of organising things.

In London, after the matches, a list of moves with annotation was faxed all over the world within 15 minutes of the conclusion. In Leningrad, a sheet bearing only the moves was typed up, a press officer with a minder was taken to the local party HQ where the only photocopier was to be found, the sheet was copied and then manually handed only to the journalists present at the event.

“They were still mired in Soviet bureaucracy and fear of publicity. I thought ‘this place is doomed’.

“It was a gigantic metaphor for the collapse of a creaking, unviable, introspective, conglomerate empire.”

There had been other rivalries that never succeeded in sparking the imagination. Mikhail Tal against Mikhail Botvinnik in the early 1960s had the same hallmarks of the non-Russian outsider against the Soviet stalwart, but failed to develop into a sustained struggle. And the earlier battle between Vasily Smyslov and Botvinnik is probably one for chess aficionados only.

The other rivalry that spread outside the world of chess was between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky. Their famous 1972 world championship match became another symbol of the struggle between civilisations.

Fischer was the Western maverick up against Spassky, the emblem of the powerful Soviet machine. And Fischer won.

“It was about Western individualism, depth of analysis, use of the technology available,” says Keene.

And the notion that ideas of a greater struggle would be imposed on chess was an invention of the Stalinist era.

The Communist official Nikolai Krylenko took his board games seriously. He was reported to have said: “We must organise shock brigades of chess players, and begin immediate realisation of a five-year plan for chess.”

He might have approved of the great rivalries with an ideological flavour that grew up in the 1970s and 80s. He would have been less delighted that on both occasions the Soviet establishment’s representative was bested.

Other sports have individual rivalries. Tennis has had some great ones.

But perhaps only boxing, with its system of champion and challengers, comes close to replicating the way that the protagonists have to study each other’s play and personality, even live in each other’s skin, during the mind-bogglingly detailed preparations for a world championship series.

KarpovKasparov

Spassky Fischer

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chessa

 CHESSA: Click on Chessa’s logo – first image in this post –  and it will take you to the official site of Chess South Africa. The link will open in a new window. Click here to follow some of the games live on Chesscube. If you are not registered on Chesscube, it will take you a few seconds and you can watch live games. You can click on “play” to register. Games start 18:30 and 9:30 local time. The final round on Saturday – 11th July – starts at 11:00-16:00 local time. To follow the games, you need to go to the SA Open-room on Chesscube (on the chatroom-list). Enjoy!

sa-chess

Images: SAOpen2009.com

sa-open

chesscube

In Cape Town, the South African Open 2009 is taking place, it started yesterday. Players from all over the world are taking part.  GM G Jones (ENG), GM D Komavor (UKR) and a few FM’s and IM’s are taking part too –  from countries other than South Africa. Exciting news: Ryan van Rensburg (2106) (SA) drew a game against  GM Dimitri Komarov (2530) (UKR).  Ryan has also beaten IM Watu Kobese (2493) (SA) in round 7 and in round 8 he drew a game against IM MABUSELA, JM (2244)! Ryan drew in round 9 his game against IM P Wang (2453) and in round 10: Ryan drew his game against FM NP van der Nat (2322) and also,   FM CCA De Villiers -2179- (SA) drew against GM G Jones-2550-(ENG).

GM A Simutowe (Zambia) is the winner of the SA Open 2009. Please click HERE for the final results. The link will open in a new window. Visit the next link to see some photos of the players.

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2009/07/14/sa-open/


GM Amon_Simutowe Zambia

GM Amon Simutowe from Zambia. He gained his third norm (rating of 2500) and qualified as a GM, the first for Africa, south of the Sahara. Please click here to play through his games on chessgames.com. The link will open in a new window.

From Chesscube: The South African Open is being contested by 208 with the following nations being represented in the field: AUS, ENG, EB, EK, FRA, GER, HUN, KEN, MAW, MOZ, NAM, NWP, NZL, RSA, UK, UKR, WP, ZIM. With 2 GM’s, a handful of IM’s, and a couple of FM’s/CM’s in the field, you are for sure to see good chess. There are 3 games being played live exclusively to ChessCube of SA Open. To watch these games all you have to do is go into the SA room and you can watch straight away. Games are commencing at 9:30 and 18.30 each day – local time.

In a world first for chess, some of the matches will be played online. This is a format many internet chess players have been waiting for – an online event being played simultaneously over 2 continents, yet officially recognized and rated by FIDE!

From Melbourne, Australia, behind the computer screens will be GM Gawain Jones (GBR, ELO 2550), IM Puchen Wang (NZL, ELO 2453), IM Mirko Rujevic (AUS, ELO 2282), and IM Leonid Sandler (AUS, ELO 2332) on standby. On the other end of the computer terminal at Cape Town, South Africa, will sit their opponents. The South African opponents will be paired each round, as will all the other players, using the Swiss Pairing system. This means that three different South African players will play online every round.

“Having these players compete in the tournament from another location using the Internet is a world first. Each Australian player will use a computer to connect to ChessCube and play their game, and will be supervised by the arbiter on that side. Similarly the players paired against them in Cape Town will play their games online using a computer, and will be supervised by an arbiter on this side,” commented Mr. Mark Levitt, founder of ChessCube. FIDE rated event over the internet! FIDE have agreed to officially rate the games played over the Internet.
ChessCube powering the community and the SA Open
ChessCube as a playing platform has been bringing innovative ideas into online chess playing for the last couple of months, turning into one of the busiest and most populated web chess servers with player peaks reaching over 3000 players online simultaneously, and a growing base that has eclipsed half a million users. The platform has turned into something that the chess world has been missing at previous online chess communities – it is a place where one can socialize and have fun at the same time.

Now ChessCube are taking a step further and create a tournament, part of which will take place online, and will be officially recognized by FIDE.- source: chessdom

All links in this post will open in a new window. You can also find the link to the official site of the SA Open 2009 on my blog’s side bar.(top)

At the same time, the African Youth Chess Championships are taking place in Cape Town too. This is a very first for Africa and South Africa has been fortunate to be chosen to host the tournament. Please follow this link to follow the results.

SA Open Schedule

Schedule – please click on the image for a larger view

Click here for the Official site of Chess South AfricaChessa – This championship started in Cape Town yesterday.  The venue is Wynberg Boys High School in Cape Town. Click here for the venue-details.
Chess Cube
is a South African chess site to publish the results and you can follow the results/pairings on this link, another site where you can play chess online too. I’m quite sure you will be impressed with the interface of Chess Cube. Click here to play chess on chesscube. Chess Cube is also the site which the English Chess Federation uses for playing chess. You will find different chat rooms on Chess Cube for different countries too, so, have your chat in your language if you wish!

Chessa chess calendar. Follow this link for all details of chess tournaments in South Africa throughout the year.

top-20-players-sa

top-players-sa

Top 40 Chess players in South Africa, Anzel Solomons (F) is in position 41 with a rating of 2043
On this link you can see the complete list of the top 100 chess players in South Africa as by 28th April 2009.

RESULTS: SA OPEN 2009

SA Open round 1 results

Results of the first 13 players in round 1. Please click HERE for pairings in round 2 and you will find the menu to more results on the top menu-bar.

SA Open round 2

SA Open round 2 01

SA Open round 2 02

On these  3 images you can see the scores of the first 38 players after round 2. On the official site – link in this post and on my side bar – you will find links to more results and the pairings. Click on the images for a larger view.

SA Open results round 3

SA Open 2009: Results round 3 – top 14 players

SA Open Pairings round 4

SA Open 2009: Pairings round 4 – top 13 boards

Results round 4 SA Open

SA Open round 4: results – top 14

Pairings round 5

SA Open : Pairings round 5 – Top 14 boards

Round 5 results SA Open

SA Open: Results round 5 – Top 14 players

Round 6 results

SA Open: Results round 6 – Top 14 players

round 7 results

SA Open: Results round 7 – Top 14 players

round8

SA Open: Results round 8: Top 14 players

round 9

SA Open 2009: Results round 9- top 14 players

round 10

SA Open 2009: Results Round 10 – top 14 players

Round 10 position 15 28

SA Open 2009: Results round 10: Position 15-28

Round 11

SA Open 2009: Results round 11 – Top 14 players

Chess games of participants  during the SA Open via the internet on Chesscube

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.03”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Smit, L”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “1848”]
[ECO “C45”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. d4  exd4 4. Nxd4  Bc5 5. Nxc6  bxc6 6. Bd3  d6 7. O-O  Ne7 8. Nd2  O-O 9. Nb3  Bb6 10. c4  Be6 11. Kh1  f5 12. Qc2  fxe4 13. Bxe4  h6 14. c5  dxc5 15. Nxc5  Bd5 16. Be3  Qc8 17. Rfd1  Bxe4 18. Qxe4  Nd5 19. Rac1  Re8 20. Qc4  Kh8 21. Bd4  Qf5 22. Re1  Nf4 23. Re3  Rxe3 24. fxe3  Nh5 25. Rf1  Qg6 26. Kg1  Rd8 27. b4  Rd5 28. Nb3  Kh7 29. Rc1  Bxd4 30. Nxd4  Re5 31. Qxc6  Qd3 32. Qc2  Rxe3 33. Qxd3+  Rxd3 34. Nb3  Rd7 35. Rc6  Nf4 36. Ra6  Nd3 37. b5  Re7 38. h4  Re1+ 39. Kh2  Re2 40. Rxa7  Nf4 41. Kg3  Nxg2 42. Nd4  Rb2 43. Rxc7  Rxa2 44. b6  Rb2 45. b7  Ne3 46. Nc6  Nd5 47. Rd7  Rb3+ 48. Kf2  Nf6 49. Re7  Nd5 50. Rd7  Nf6 51. Rf7  Kg6 52. Re7  Nd5 53. Re6+  Kf7 54. Rd6  Rxb7 55. Nd8+   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.03”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Wang, P”]
[Black “Akande, T”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2453”]
[BlackElo “1830”]
[ECO “C88”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. Bb5  a6 4. Ba4  Nf6 5. O-O  Be7 6. Re1  b5 7. Bb3  d6 8. c3  O-O 9. h3  Bb7 10. d4  Re8 11. Nbd2  Bf8 12. d5  Ne7 13. Nf1  h6 14. N3h2  c6 15. dxc6  Bxc6 16. Qf3  Ng6 17. Ng4  a5 18. a3  a4 19. Ba2  Bd7 20. Ng3  Nh4 21. Nxf6+  Qxf6 22. Qxf6  gxf6 23. Nh5  Bg7 24. Bxh6  Bh8 25. Rad1  Ra6 26. Be3  Bxh3 27. gxh3  Nf3+ 28. Kf1  Nxe1 29. Kxe1  Re7 30. Ke2  Kh7 31. Ng3  Bg7 32. Nf5  Rd7 33. Rd5   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.03”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Rujevic, M”]
[Black “Swanson, D”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2282”]
[BlackElo “1818”]
[ECO “C18”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Qa5 7. Bd2 c4 8. Qg4 g6 9. h4 h5 10. Qf4 Nc6 11. Nf3 Nce7 12. Ng5 Nf5 13. f3 Qc7 14. g4 hxg4 15. fxg4 Ng7 16. a4 f5 17. exf6 Qxf4 18. Bxf4 Nxf6 19. Be5 Ke7 20. Be2 Bd7 21. Bxf6+ Kxf6 22. Rf1+ Nf5 23. gxf5 1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Lewis, M”]
[Black “Jones, G”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2038”]
[BlackElo “2550”]
[ECO “A57”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. c4  c5 3. d5  b5 4. cxb5  a6 5. b6  g6 6. Nc3  Qxb6 7. e4  d6 8. Be2  Bg7 9. Nf3  O-O 10. O-O  Bg4 11. Nd2  Bxe2 12. Qxe2  Nbd7 13. Kh1  Qc7 14. Nc4  Nb6 15. Bd2  Nxc4 16. Qxc4  Nd7 17. f4  Rfb8 18. b3  Rb4 19. Qe2  Rb7 20. Rac1  Nb6 21. Nd1  a5 22. Bc3  a4 23. Bxg7  Kxg7 24. b4  Nd7 25. a3  Qb6 26. bxc5  Nxc5 27. Rc3  Qb5 28. Qxb5  Rxb5 29. Nf2  Rb3 30. Rfc1  Rab8 31. g3  Rxc3 32. Rxc3  Rb3 33. Rc2  Rxa3 34. e5  Rb3 35. exd6  exd6 36. Kg2  a3 37. Ra2  Na4 38. Nd1  Rb2+ 39. Nxb2  axb2  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Vermaak, F”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “1953”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “B12”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c6 2. d4  d5 3. e5  c5 4. dxc5  Nc6 5. Nc3  e6 6. Nf3  Bxc5 7. Bd3  f6 8. exf6  Nxf6 9. Bg5  O-O 10. O-O  Bd7 11. Qe2  Qc7 12. Bh4  Rae8 13. Rae1  a6 14. Bg3  Qd8 15. Ne5  Nxe5 16. Bxe5  Re7 17. Nb1  Be8 18. Bxf6  Rxf6 19. Nd2  e5 20. b4  Bxb4 21. c4  e4 22. Bc2  Qc7 23. Rc1  Qf4 24. Nb3  Rh6 25. g3  Qf5 26. f4  Qh3 27. cxd5  Bb5 28. Qg2  Bxf1 29. Rxf1  Qxg2+ 30. Kxg2  e3 31. d6  Rxd6  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Cruywagen, J”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “1931”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “C77”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. Bb5  a6 4. Ba4  Nf6 5. d3  b5 6. Bb3  Be7 7. O-O  d6 8. c3  O-O 9. Nbd2  Na5 10. Bc2  c5 11. Re1  Re8 12. Nf1  Bf8 13. Bg5  h6 14. Bd2  Nc6 15. Ng3  g6 16. a4  b4 17. h3  Be6 18. Bb3  Bxb3 19. Qxb3  Rb8 20. c4  Bg7 21. Be3  Nd7 22. Nh2  Nd4 23. Qd1  b3 24. Bxd4  cxd4 25. a5  Nc5 26. Ne2  h5 27. f4  Bh6 28. Rf1  Rb7 29. Rf3  Ne6 30. g3  Rf8 31. Kg2  Kh7 32. f5  Nc5 33. Nc1  Qg5 34. Ne2  Kg8 35. Nf1  Qd8 36. Qe1  gxf5 37. exf5  f6 38. Nd2  d5 39. cxd5  Qxd5 40. Nf1  Nxd3 41. Qb1  e4 42. Rf2  Nxf2 43. Kxf2  e3+ 44. Kg1  d3  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Van Der Nat, N”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “2322”]
[ECO “B23”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nc3  Nc6 3. f4  g6 4. Nf3  Bg7 5. Bb5  Nd4 6. O-O  a6 7. Bd3  d6 8. Nxd4  cxd4 9. Ne2  Nf6 10. Kh1  O-O 11. Nxd4  Nxe4 12. Bxe4  Bxd4 13. Qf3  Rb8 14. c3  Bg7 15. f5  b5 16. d4  Qc7 17. Bg5  b4 18. Rae1  h6 19. Bd2  bxc3 20. bxc3  gxf5 21. Qg3  Kh7 22. Rxf5  Bxf5 23. Bxf5+  Kh8 24. Qh3  e6 25. Bd3  Rfe8 26. Bxh6  f5 27. Re3  Bxd4 28. Rg3  Qh7 29. cxd4  Rg8 30. d5  Rg6 31. Rxg6  Qxg6 32. dxe6  Qxe6 33. Be3+  Kg8 34. Bxf5  Qe7 35. Be6+  Kg7 36. Qh6#   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Wang, P”]
[Black “Mabusela, J”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2453”]
[BlackElo “2244”]
[ECO “A05”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. Nf3  Nf6 2. c4  e6 3. Nc3  c5 4. g3  b6 5. Bg2  Bb7 6. O-O  Be7 7. d4  cxd4 8. Qxd4  Nc6 9. Qd3  O-O 10. Rd1  Qc8 11. Bg5  Rd8 12. Rac1  h6 13. Bf4  d5 14. cxd5  Nxd5 15. Nxd5  Rxd5 16. Qb3  Rc5 17. Rxc5  Bxc5 18. a3  Ne7 19. Qd3  a5 20. h4  Nd5 21. Be5  Qe8 22. e4  Ne7 23. b4  axb4 24. axb4  Bxb4 25. Bxg7  Kxg7 26. Qd4+  Kh7 27. Qxb4  Ra4 28. Qxb6  Bxe4 29. Rd8  Qc6 30. Qb2  Ng8 31. Ne5   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.04”]
[Round “3”]
[White “Rujevic, M”]
[Black “McCallum, B”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2282”]
[BlackElo “1614”]
[ECO “B62”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nf3  d6 3. d4  cxd4 4. Nxd4  Nf6 5. Nc3  Nc6 6. Bg5  e6 7. Be2  Be7 8. O-O  O-O 9. Ndb5  Ne8 10. Bxe7  Qxe7 11. f4  a6 12. Nd4  Nxd4 13. Qxd4  Bd7 14. Rad1  Bc6 15. Bf3  e5 16. Qe3  Nc7 17. f5  Rad8 18. a4  b5 19. a5  b4 20. Nd5  Bxd5 21. exd5  f6 22. Be2  Rb8 23. Rf4  Qf7 24. Rg4  Kh8 25. Qd2  Qd7 26. Rxb4  Qxf5 27. Rb6  Qe4 28. b3  Rxb6 29. axb6  Nb5 30. Bxb5  axb5 31. Ra1  h6 32. b7   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.05”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Amini, D”]
[Black “Jones, G”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “1675”]
[BlackElo “2550”]
[ECO “E71”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. c4  g6 3. Nc3  Bg7 4. e4  d6 5. h3  O-O 6. Nf3  Qe8 7. Be2  e5 8. dxe5  dxe5 9. Be3  b6 10. O-O  Bb7 11. Qc2  c5 12. Nd5  Nc6 13. Nc7  Qb8 14. Nxa8  Qxa8 15. Nd2  Nxe4 16. Bf3  Nxd2 17. Qxd2  Rd8 18. Bd5  Nd4 19. Bxb7  Qxb7 20. Kh1  f5 21. Bg5  Rd7 22. Rad1  f4 23. f3  Rd6 24. Qe1  Qa6 25. Qe4  h6 26. Qa8+  Kh7 27. Be7  Rc6 28. b3  Rc8 29. Qd5  Nf5 30. Qd7  Rg8 31. Rf2  Kh8 32. Qe6  Qc8 33. Qxc8  Rxc8 34. Rd8+  Rxd8 35. Bxd8  e4 36. fxe4  Ng3+ 37. Kh2  Be5 38. Rf3  Nxe4 39. Kg1  Bd4+ 40. Kh1  Be5 41. a4  g5 42. Kg1  Kg7 43. Rd3  Bd4+ 44. Kf1  Kg6 45. a5  bxa5 46. Bxa5  Ng3+ 47. Ke1  Kf5 48. b4  Ke4 49. Rf3  Nf5 50. bxc5  Bxc5 51. Bd2  Nh4 52. Rb3  Nxg2+ 53. Kf1  Nh4 54. Bb4  Bd4 55. c5  Kd5 56. Rd3  Nf5 57. Ke2  h5 58. Rd1  g4 59. hxg4  hxg4 60. Bc3  f3+ 61. Kd3  Bxc3 62. Kxc3+  Kxc5 63. Ra1  Ng3  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.05”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Phiri, R”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2145”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “D86”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. c4  g6 3. Nc3  d5 4. cxd5  Nxd5 5. e4  Nxc3 6. bxc3  Bg7 7. Bc4  c5 8. Ne2  O-O 9. O-O  Nc6 10. Be3  Bd7 11. Rb1  cxd4 12. cxd4  Rc8 13. Bd3  Na5 14. d5  b6 15. Ba6  Ra8 16. Qd3  Bc8 17. Rfc1  Bxa6 18. Qxa6  Qd7 19. Qd3  Rac8 20. Bd4  Bxd4 21. Qxd4  Qd6 22. Rc3  e5 23. Qd3  Rxc3 24. Qxc3  Nb7 25. f3  f5 26. Rd1  fxe4 27. fxe4  Nc5 28. Qe3  Rf7 29. Nc3  a6 30. Rf1  b5 31. Rxf7  Kxf7 32. Nd1  Nd7 33. h3  a5 34. Qf2+  Ke7 35. Qh4+  Nf6 36. Nf2  h5 37. Qg5  Kf7 38. Nd3  Nxe4 39. Qxe5  Qxe5 40. Nxe5+  Kf6 41. Nc6  a4 42. a3  Nc3 43. d6  Ke6 44. Ne5  Kxd6 45. Nxg6  b4 46. Nh4  b3 47. Nf5+  Kc5  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.05”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Peretz, L”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “1875”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “A48”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. Nf3  g6 3. Bf4  Bg7 4. Qd2  O-O 5. Bh6  d6 6. Bxg7  Kxg7 7. Nc3  c6 8. e4  Bg4 9. Ng5  Qa5 10. h3  Bc8 11. Be2  h6 12. Nf3  Nbd7 13. O-O  e5 14. Rae1  Re8 15. Bc4  Re7 16. a3  Nf8 17. Re3  Qc7 18. Rfe1  a5 19. Nh2  b5 20. Ba2  b4 21. Ne2  Qb6 22. dxe5  dxe5 23. Ng3  Be6 24. Bb1  Rd8 25. Qc1  bxa3 26. bxa3  Red7 27. c4  Qc5 28. Rc3  Rd2 29. Rf1  Bc8 30. Nf3  R2d6 31. Kh1  Ne6 32. Nxe5  Qxe5 33. f4  Nxf4 34. Rcf3  g5 35. Qe1  Rd2 36. R3f2  Rxf2 37. Qxf2  Qd4 38. Qf3  Be6 39. e5  Qxe5 40. Qxc6  Rd2 41. Be4  Nxe4 42. Nxe4  Rc2 43. Nd6  Nh5 44. Ne8+  Kg6 45. Qf3  Ng3+ 46. Kg1  Nxf1 47. Qd3+  Qf5  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.05”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “C69”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. Bb5  a6 4. Bxc6  dxc6 5. O-O  Bg4 6. h3  h5 7. d3  Qf6 8. Be3  Bxf3 9. Qxf3  Qxf3 10. gxf3  Bd6 11. Nd2  Ne7 12. Rfb1  g5 13. Kf1  f6 14. b4  Ng6 15. Ke2  Nf8 16. a4  Ne6 17. Nc4  Kd7 18. c3  Rhg8 19. Na5  b6 20. Nb3  Kc8 21. a5  b5 22. d4  Kb7 23. Nc5+  Bxc5 24. bxc5  Rad8 25. Rd1  Rge8 26. dxe5  fxe5 27. Rxd8  Rxd8 28. Rg1  Rg8 29. h4  g4 30. fxg4  hxg4 31. h5  Nf4+ 32. Bxf4  exf4 33. h6  g3 34. Kf3  Rg6 35. Rh1  g2 36. Rg1  Rxh6 37. Rxg2  Rh3+ 38. Kxf4  Rxc3 39. e5  Rxc5 40. e6  Rc2 41. Ke3  Rc1 42. Kd2  Rh1 43. f4  Rh8 44. f5  Kc8 45. f6  Kd8 46. Ke3  c5 47. f7  Rf8 48. Rg8  Ke7 49. Ke4  c4 50. Ke5  c3 51. Rxf8   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.05”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Wang, P”]
[Black “Simutowe, A”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2453”]
[BlackElo “2481”]
[ECO “B28”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nf3  a6 3. c3  d5 4. exd5  Qxd5 5. d4  Nf6 6. Be3  cxd4 7. cxd4  e6 8. Nc3  Qa5 9. Bd3  b5 10. O-O  Bb7 11. Re1  Nbd7  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.06”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Simutowe, A”]
[Black “Jones, G”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2481”]
[BlackElo “2550”]
[ECO “B22”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. c3  d5 3. exd5  Qxd5 4. d4  Nc6 5. Nf3  Bg4 6. Be2  cxd4 7. cxd4  e6 8. Nc3  Qa5 9. Be3  Nf6 10. Qb3  Qb4 11. Qxb4  Bxb4 12. h3  Bh5 13. O-O  O-O 14. Rac1  Rfd8 15. Rfd1  Nd5 16. Kf1  Nxe3+ 17. fxe3  f6 18. Ne4  Bf7 19. Nc5  Bxc5 20. Rxc5  Nb4 21. a3  b6 22. Rc4  Nd5 23. Kf2  Be8 24. e4  Nf4 25. Bf1  Bb5 26. Rc3  Bxf1 27. Kxf1  f5 28. Re1  Rd6 29. g3  fxe4 30. Rxe4  Nd5  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.06”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Masango, S”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2130”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “D91”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. c4  g6 3. Nc3  d5 4. Nf3  Bg7 5. Bg5  Ne4 6. cxd5  Nxg5 7. Nxg5  e6 8. Qd2  h6 9. Nf3  exd5 10. e3  O-O 11. Bd3  c6 12. O-O  Qe7 13. e4  dxe4 14. Nxe4  Be6 15. Rfe1  Nd7 16. Qf4  Rad8 17. h4  Kh8 18. Qg3  Qb4 19. a3  Qb6 20. Nd6  Bxd4 21. Rxe6  Bxf2+ 22. Qxf2  fxe6 23. Ne4  Ne5 24. Qxb6  Nxf3+ 25. gxf3  axb6 26. Be2  Rf4 27. h5  gxh5 28. Kf2  h4 29. Rg1  Rdf8 30. Ke3  h3 31. Rh1  Rh4 32. Rh2  Rf5 33. Bf1  Rfh5 34. Nf2  Re5+ 35. Ne4  Reh5 36. Nf2  Kg7 37. Rxh3  Rxh3 38. Bxh3  Kf6 39. Ne4+  Ke7 40. Bf1  Rh2 41. Nf2  Rh5 42. f4  e5 43. fxe5  Rxe5+ 44. Ne4  Rh5 45. Nf2  Kd6 46. Ne4+  Ke5 47. Nf2  Rg5 48. Nd3+  Kf6 49. Nf2  Rg1 50. Ke2  h5 51. Bh3  Rg7 52. Bc8  Ke5 53. Nd3+  Ke4 54. a4  h4 55. Nf2+  Kd4 56. Kf3  Rg3+ 57. Kf4  Rg7 58. b4  Kc4 59. a5  Kxb4 60. axb6  Kb5 61. Ne4  Kxb6 62. Be6  Kc7 63. Ng5  Kd6 64. Bc8  b5 65. Nf3  Rg8 66. Bf5  Rh8 67. Kg4  Rg8+ 68. Kf4  Rh8 69. Kg4  h3 70. Kg3  Rg8+ 71. Kf4  Rf8 72. Kg4  c5 73. Nh2  c4 74. Be4  Rh8 75. Kf3  Kc5 76. Ke3  b4 77. Bf5  b3 78. Kd2  Rf8  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.06”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Rujevic, M”]
[Black “Mabusela, J”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2282”]
[BlackElo “2244”]
[ECO “C11”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e6 2. d4  d5 3. Nc3  Nf6 4. e5  Nfd7 5. f4  c5 6. Nf3  Nc6 7. Be3  cxd4 8. Nxd4  Bc5 9. Qd2  O-O 10. O-O-O  a6 11. Nb3  Bb4 12. a3  Be7 13. Ne2  b5 14. Ned4  Nxd4 15. Bxd4  Nb6 16. Qa5  Rb8 17. Nc5  Nc4 18. Qxd8  Rxd8 19. Bd3  Na5 20. Rhe1  Nc6 21. Bf2  a5 22. g4  a4 23. c3  d4 24. cxd4  Nxd4 25. Ne4  Bb7 26. Nd6  Nb3+ 27. Kb1  Bxd6 28. exd6  Bd5 29. f5  Bf3 30. fxe6  fxe6 31. Be2  Be4+ 32. Bd3  Bf3 33. Be2  Be4+ 34. Bd3  Bf3  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.07”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “C03”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e6 2. d4  d5 3. Nd2  dxe4 4. Nxe4  Nd7 5. Nf3  Ngf6 6. Nxf6+  Nxf6 7. g3  b6 8. Bb5+  Bd7 9. Bxd7+  Qxd7 10. O-O  Bd6 11. Qe2  O-O 12. Bg5  Be7 13. c4  Rfe8 14. Rad1  h6 15. Ne5  Qc8 16. Bxf6  Bxf6 17. Nc6  e5 18. dxe5  Re6 19. Qf3  Qe8 20. exf6  Qxc6 21. Qxc6  Rxc6 22. Rfe1  Rxf6 23. Rd7  c5 24. h4  h5 25. Kg2  a5 26. f4  g6 27. Kf3  Rc8 28. Red1  Re8 29. Rb7  Kg7 30. Rd3  Re1 31. Rb3  Ree6 32. Rd7  Rd6 33. Rd3   1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.07”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Makoto, R”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2157”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “A05”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. Nf3  Nf6 2. d4  g6 3. g3  Bg7 4. Bg2  O-O 5. c4  d6 6. O-O  Nbd7 7. Nc3  c6 8. h3  e5 9. e4  Re8 10. Re1  Qc7 11. Be3  a5 12. Rc1  Qb8 13. Qd2  b5 14. dxe5  dxe5 15. cxb5  cxb5 16. Nd5  Nxd5 17. exd5  Bb7 18. d6  Nf6 19. Rc7  Ne4 20. Qd3  Ra6 21. Ng5  Rxd6 22. Qxb5  Nxg5 23. Rxb7  Nxh3+ 24. Bxh3  Qd8 25. Rd7  Rxd7 26. Qxd7  Qxd7  1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.08”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Komarov, D”]
[Black “Jones, G”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2530”]
[BlackElo “2550”]
[ECO “A48”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. Nf3  g6 3. c4  Bg7 4. Nc3  O-O 5. e4  d6 6. Be2  e5 7. O-O  Nc6 8. d5  Ne7 9. b4  c6 10. Nd2  a5 11. bxa5  Qxa5  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.08”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Wang, P”]
[Black “Mosethle, K”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2453”]
[BlackElo “2169”]
[ECO “B90”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nf3  d6 3. d4  cxd4 4. Nxd4  Nf6 5. Nc3  a6 6. Be3  e5 7. Nf3  Qc7 8. a4  b6 9. Be2  Bb7 10. Nd2  d5 11. Nxd5  Nxd5 12. exd5  Bxd5 13. O-O  Be7 14. Bf3  Bxf3 15. Qxf3  Nc6 16. Qg3  O-O 17. Bh6  Bf6 18. Ne4  Qe7 19. c3  Kh8 20. Nxf6  Qxf6 21. Be3  Rab8 22. f4  e4 23. f5  h6 24. Rad1  Rfd8 25. Rxd8+  Rxd8 26. Bxb6  Rd2 27. b4  Rd3 28. Qf4  Rxc3 29. Qxe4  Rb3 30. Bc5  Rb2 31. h4  Kh7 32. Rd1  Nxb4 33. Bd4  Qd6 34. f6+  g6 35. Qe7  Qd5 36. Bxb2  Qxd1+ 37. Kh2   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.08”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Rujevic, M”]
[Black “Solomons, R”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2282”]
[BlackElo “1921”]
[ECO “B23”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nc3  a6 3. a4  b6 4. Nf3  d6 5. d4  cxd4 6. Nxd4  Nf6 7. Bd3  e6 8. O-O  Be7 9. f4  Qc7 10. Qe2  Nbd7 11. Bd2  Bb7 12. Rae1  Nc5 13. Kh1  O-O 14. b4  Nxd3 15. cxd3  Rac8 16. Rc1  Qb8 17. Qf2  Rfe8 18. Nc2  Ba8 19. Ne3  d5 20. exd5  Nxd5 21. Ncxd5  Bxd5 22. Nxd5  exd5 23. Bc3  b5 24. a5  Qd6 25. Qb2  Qg6 26. Rf3  Qd6 27. Rb1  Bf6 28. Bxf6  Qxf6 29. Qxf6  gxf6 30. Kg1  Rc2 31. Rf2  Rec8 32. g4  R8c3 33. g5  Kg7 34. h4  Kg6 35. f5+  Kh5 36. gxf6  Kxh4 37. Re1  Kg5 38. Rxc2  Rxc2 39. Re5  Kxf6 40. Rxd5  Ke7 41. Kf1  Rb2 42. Rd4  h5 43. Rh4  Rd2 44. Rxh5  Rxd3 45. Rh6  Rd6 46. Rh4  Kf6 47. Rh5  Ke5 48. Ke2  Rf6 49. Ke3  Rxf5 50. Rh8  Rf6 51. Rb8  Kd5 52. Kd3  Re6 53. Rf8  f6 54. Rf7  Ke5 55. Ke3  Rd6 56. Rf8  Rc6 57. Re8+  Kf5 58. Rb8  Ke5 59. Re8+  Kd5 60. Kd3  f5 61. Rf8  Ke5 62. Rb8  Rc4 63. Rb6  Rxb4 64. Rxa6  Ra4 65. Ra8  Kf4 66. a6  Kf3 67. a7  f4 68. Kc3  Rc4+ 69. Kb3  Rc7 70. Kb4  Rb7 71. Kc3  b4+ 72. Kb3  Kf2  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.09”]
[Round “9”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Mabusela, J”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “2244”]
[ECO “C07”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e6 2. d4  d5 3. Nd2  c5 4. Ngf3  Nc6 5. exd5  exd5 6. Bb5  Bd6 7. dxc5  Bxc5 8. O-O  Ne7 9. Nb3  Bd6 10. Re1  O-O 11. Bg5  Qc7 12. Bh4  Nf5 13. Bg3  Nxg3 14. hxg3  a6 15. Bd3  Qb6 16. Re3  h6 17. Qd2  Nb4 18. Nfd4  Nxd3 19. Qxd3  Bd7 20. Nf5  Bxf5 21. Qxf5  a5 22. a4  Rac8 23. Rd1  d4 24. Nxd4  Qxb2 25. Rb3  Qa2 26. Rxb7  Bc5 27. Nb3  Bb4 28. Rxf7  Rxf7 29. Qxc8+  Rf8 30. Qc4+  Kh8 31. Nxa5  Qxc4 32. Nxc4  Rc8  1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.09”]
[Round “9”]
[White “Van Rensburg, R”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2106”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “D11”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  d5 2. c4  c6 3. Nf3  Nf6 4. Qb3  g6 5. Nc3  Bg7 6. g3  O-O 7. Bg2  dxc4 8. Qxc4  Be6 9. Qd3  Na6 10. O-O  Nb4 11. Qd1  h6 12. Re1  Nbd5 13. e4  Nxc3 14. bxc3  Qa5 15. Qc2  Qh5 16. Rb1  b5 17. Ne5  Ng4 18. Nxg4  Bxg4 19. Qd3  Rad8 20. f3  Be6 21. Qc2  Bc4 22. Qf2  f5 23. exf5  Qxf5 24. Ba3  Rfe8 25. f4  Bd5 26. Rb2  e6  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.09”]
[Round “9”]
[White “Quirk, T”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “1495”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “B01”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  d5 2. exd5  Qxd5 3. Nf3  e5 4. Nc3  Qe6 5. Bb5+  c6 6. Ba4  Bd6 7. O-O  Ne7 8. Re1  f5 9. d4  e4 10. Bg5  O-O 11. d5  Qg6 12. Bxe7  Bxe7 13. Nd4  Rd8 14. Nce2  Bd6 15. f4  cxd5 16. Bb3  Bc5 17. Kh1  Nc6 18. Nb5  Qf7 19. Qd2  a6 20. Nbc3  Be6 21. Rad1  d4 22. Bxe6  Qxe6 23. Na4  Bb4 24. c3  dxc3 25. Qe3  cxb2  0-1

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.10”]
[Round “10”]
[White “De Villiers, C”]
[Black “Jones, G”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2179”]
[BlackElo “2550”]
[ECO “E76”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. d4  Nf6 2. c4  g6 3. Nc3  Bg7 4. e4  d6 5. f4  O-O 6. Nf3  Na6 7. e5  Nd7 8. c5  c6 9. Bxa6  bxa6 10. Be3  Rb8 11. O-O  Rxb2 12. Qa4  Nb8 13. Qa3  Rb7 14. cxd6  exd6 15. Ne4  d5 16. Nd6  Qe7 17. Bf2  Rb6 18. Bh4  f6 19. Rae1  Be6 20. Re3  Qd7 21. exf6  Bxf6 22. Bxf6  Rxf6 23. Ne5  Qd8 24. Ng4  Bxg4 25. Re8+  Qxe8 26. Nxe8  Re6 27. h3  Rxe8 28. hxg4  Re2 29. Rf3  Rb1+ 30. Kh2  Rbb2 31. Re3  Rxg2+ 32. Kh1  Rge2 33. Rxe2  Rxe2 34. Qd6  Re8 35. Qc7  a5 36. f5  gxf5 37. gxf5  Rf8 38. f6  Rxf6 39. Qxb8+  Kg7 40. Qxa7+  Kg6 41. Qxa5  Kf5 42. Qc7  Rh6+ 43. Kg2  Ke4 44. Qe5+  Kd3 45. Kf2  Rh1 46. Qe3+  Kc4 47. Kg2  Rb1 48. Qe2+  Kc3 49. Qe3+  Kc4 50. Kf2  Rb2+ 51. Kf3  Rxa2 52. Kf4  Ra8 53. Qe7  Kxd4 54. Qb4+  Kd3 55. Qb6  Ra4+ 56. Ke5  Re4+ 57. Kd6  Rc4 58. Qb1+  Kd2 59. Qxh7  d4 60. Qh2+  Kc3 61. Qe5  Kb3 62. Qe4  Kc3 63. Qe1+  Kc2 64. Qe2+  Kc3 65. Qe1+  Kc2 66. Qe2+  Kb3 67. Qd3+  Kb4 68. Qb1+  Kc3 69. Qa1+  Kd2 70. Qb2+  Ke3 71. Qb6  Rc2 72. Ke5  c5 73. Qh6+  Kd3 74. Qg6+  Kc3 75. Qg1  Kc4 76. Qg8+  Kc3 77. Qg1  Kb2 78. Ke4  Rc3 79. Qf2+  Kb3 80. Qf7+  Kb2 81. Qf2+  Ka3 82. Qd2  Kb3 83. Qd1+  Kb2 84. Qe2+  Kb3 85. Qb5+  Ka2 86. Qa6+  Kb1 87. Qb5+  Kc1 88. Qf1+  Kd2 89. Qf2+  Kd1 90. Qf1+  Kc2 91. Qe2+  Kc1  1/2-1/2

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.10”]
[Round “10”]
[White “Komarov, D”]
[Black “Wang, P”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2530”]
[BlackElo “2453”]
[ECO “A11”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. c4  c6 2. Nf3  d5 3. e3  Nf6 4. Nc3  e6 5. d4  Nbd7 6. Qc2  b6 7. Bd3  Bb7 8. O-O  Be7 9. b3  Rc8 10. Bb2  dxc4 11. bxc4  c5 12. d5  exd5 13. cxd5  Nxd5 14. Nxd5  Bxd5 15. Rad1  Bf6 16. Ba6  Bxf3 17. gxf3  Rc7 18. Bxf6  Qxf6 19. Bb5  Ke7 20. Bxd7  Rxd7 21. Qe4+  Qe6 22. Rxd7+  Kxd7 23. Qb7+   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.10”]
[Round “10”]
[White “Rujevic, M”]
[Black “Mare, M”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2282”]
[BlackElo “1828”]
[ECO “C33”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. f4  exf4 3. Bc4  Qh4+ 4. Kf1  Nc6 5. Nf3  Qh5 6. d4  d6 7. Bxf4  Bg4 8. c3  O-O-O 9. Nbd2  Nge7 10. d5  Ne5 11. Be2  N7g6 12. Be3  f5 13. Nd4  fxe4 14. h3  Bxe2+ 15. Qxe2  Qh4 16. Bf2  Qh6 17. Nxe4  Nf4 18. Qd2  Nxd5 19. Qxh6  gxh6 20. Kg1  Be7 21. Rd1  Nf4 22. Nf5  Rde8 23. Nxh6  Nfd3 24. b3  Ref8 25. Bg3  Nf4 26. Kh2  Nfg6 27. c4  Bh4 28. Rhf1  Bxg3+ 29. Nxg3  Rxf1 30. Rxf1  Rf8 31. Rxf8+  Nxf8 32. Ne4  Nd3 33. Nf5  Nc1 34. Nc3  Kd7 35. Nd4  c6 36. g4  Ne6 37. Nf3  h6 38. Kg3  Ke7 39. Ne1  Kf6 40. h4  Nc5 41. Kf3  N1d3 42. Nc2  Ne5+ 43. Kg3  a5 44. Nd4  Nf7 45. Kf4  Nd3+ 46. Ke3  Nde5 47. Ne4+  Ke7 48. Kf4  Ng6+ 49. Kg3  d5 50. cxd5  cxd5 51. Nf5+  Ke6 52. Nc5+  Ke5 53. Nxb7  a4 54. bxa4  d4 55. Nc5  Kd5 56. Nb3  Kc4 57. Nfxd4  Nd6 58. a5  Kb4 59. a6  Nc8 60. Nc6+  Ka3 61. a7  Nb6 62. Nbd4  Kxa2 63. Nf5  h5 64. gxh5  Nf8 65. Nce7  Kb3 66. Nd5  Na8 67. Nf6  Kc4 68. Kf4  Kc5 69. Kg5  Kb6 70. h6  Kxa7 71. h7  Nxh7+ 72. Nxh7  Nc7 73. h5   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.11”]
[Round “11”]
[White “Jones, G”]
[Black “Simotowe, M”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2550”]
[BlackElo “2110”]
[ECO “C42”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nf6 3. Nxe5  d6 4. Nf3  Nxe4 5. c4  Be7 6. Nc3  Nxc3 7. dxc3  O-O 8. Qc2  Nd7 9. Bd3  Nf6 10. Be3  c6 11. h3  Qa5 12. Bd4  Re8 13. b4  Qc7 14. O-O-O  g6 15. Rhe1  Nh5 16. Qd2  Be6 17. g4  Ng7 18. Qh6  f6 19. Ng5   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.11”]
[Round “11”]
[White “Wang, P”]
[Black “De Villiers, C”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2453”]
[BlackElo “2179”]
[ECO “B30”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  c5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. c3  d5 4. exd5  Qxd5 5. d4  Bg4 6. Be2  e6 7. h3  Bh5 8. c4  Qd6 9. d5  exd5 10. cxd5  Bxf3 11. Bxf3  Nd4 12. Nc3  Nf6 13. Be3  Nxf3+ 14. Qxf3  Be7 15. O-O-O  O-O 16. Bf4  Qa6 17. d6  Bd8 18. Rhe1  Ba5 19. Kb1  Bxc3 20. Qxc3  Nd7 21. Re7  Qa4 22. Qf3  c4 23. Rd4  Qb5 24. Rd5  Qc6 25. Rd4  Qb5 26. a4  Qxa4 27. Bh6  gxh6 28. Rg4+  Kh8 29. Rxd7   1-0

[Event “SA Open”]
[Site chesscube.com]
[Date “2009.07.11”]
[Round “11”]
[White “Meintjies, J”]
[Black “Rujevic, M”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “1915”]
[BlackElo “2282”]
[ECO “C77”]
[Time “1:30:00”]
[TimeControl “1½ hours + 30”]

1. e4  e5 2. Nf3  Nc6 3. Bb5  a6 4. Ba4  Nf6 5. d4  Nxe4 6. Qe2  Nd6 7. dxe5  Nf5 8. Qe4  g6  1/2-1/2
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chesslove

chessboard-pieces

dachess2

dachess3

dachess4

I’ve thought to blog one of my most recent games – while I’m in blogging chess-stuff the last 2 days! Actually, I don’t have time to blog now, but hey, I need a break too, hehe..I am actually waiting for the South Africans! What’s going on with CHESSA’s site today! I can’t get the results for my entry about the SA Women’s! Can someone give them a shout ple….ase! Update: Thank you! They’re back online! I could hear alot of shouting going on!

This game was a friendly against of one my big favourite players. He’s a very good player and sometimes makes some moves just to let me win, that’s what I think, but he’s denying it completely by saying he hates to lose and therefore doesn’t do it on purpose. We started this game a few days ago and when I forked his King/Queen with my Knight,  he made another blunder and then resigned. I preferred to capture his Bishop in the second fork, instead of his Rook as I knew how deadly his Bishops are. On the first image you can see my two Knights conferencing about some moves..hehe…I love my Knights and will always do everything to keep them. Although he’s a much stronger player than I am, I do like to play him as he’s racking my brains with his moves. Here are the moves in this game.

1. e4 Nc6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Bb5 e6 5. Bd2 Qd7 6. Bc3 a6 7. Bxc6 bxc6 8. Nd2 c5 9. Ne2 Be7 10. O-O cxd4 11. Bxd4 c5 12. Be3 d4 13. Bf4 Bd8 14. c4 Ne7 15. b3 O-O 16. h3 h6 17. Nf3 Bh7 18. Bg3 Nf5 19. Bh2 Ba5 20. Ng3 Ne7 21. Nh5 Nc6 22. Nh4 Bc7 23. Re1 a5 24. Qg4 g6 25. Nf6+ Kh8 26. Nxd7 Bb6 27. Nxb6  
Click on this Wiki-link for Chess Openings. Did you know that there are 318,979,564,000 possible ways to play the first four moves of a chess game on each side of of the board.
trappedqueen_001

This game was a game against a different player and it shows you how you can get your Queen trapped when you bring her out too early. I prefer not to bring her out early unless I have to for a reason. I think this player learnt a good lesson and I myself saw what can happen if you play carelessly around with your Queen.
elmer-chess

…and if Elmer can play chess…so can anyone else too..hehe.

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caissa1

Image: caissa.com

caissa3

Image: Chessville

Play chess on caissa.com

Caissa is the “patron goddess” of chess players.

She was created in a poem called Caïssa written in 1763 by English poet and philologist Sir William Jones.

Scacchia ludus was the basis for the poem written by William Jones in 1763.  While Scacchis may have been the first Goddess of Chess, Caïssa is certainly the most famous and sustaining. In the poem Caïssa, Mars becomes infatuated with a nymph named Caïssa but she does not return the favor and is in fact a bit repulsed by the God of War. Not one to give up the fight, Mars enlists the aid of an ally, Euphron, the God of Sports and Games. Euphon creates the game of chess and designs a beautiful and elaborate board and chess set for Mars to give to Caïssa. In the poem, Mars gains Caïssa’s attention this way and teaches her how to play. As the game progresses, Caïssa’s resistance wears down and in the end, Mars wins more than just the game. But Caïssa wins eternal fame.

…fram’d a tablet of celestial mold,
Inlay’d with squares of silver and of gold;
Then of two metals form’d the warlike band,
That here compact in show of battle stand;
He taught the rules that guide the pensive game,
And call’d it Caissa from the dryad’s name:
(Whence Albion’s sons, who most its praise confess,
Approv’d the play, and nam’d it thoughtful Chess.)
Mars then presents the game of chess to Caissa in an attempt to win her affection.

For chess players, Caissa is often invoked as a source of inspiration or luck, e.g. “Caissa was with me in that game.”
vidabook

Image: sbchess.sinfree.net

Caissa is also spelled Caïssa.

Caïssa is quite frequently referred to in chess commentary. Garry Kasparov uses this reference now and again, especially in his epic volume My Great Predecessors. It is used as a substitute for being lucky – “Caïssa was with me” – especially in unclear situations, for example in sacrifices. Caïssa as a concept has also been explored by some who seek the evidence of the sacred feminine in chess. The first (Russian) computer program that won the World Computer Chess Championship (in 1974) was also named Caïssa.

On this next link – which will open in a new window – you will also find a bit of info about Caïssa and a link to mythology-images.

http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Caissa.html

Source of the poem: click HERE to view the site.

The poem is based on Scacchia ludus (‘The Game of Chess’) written in 1510 by Marco Girolamo Vida– an Italian poet and later Bishop of Alba – where the nymph is called Scacchis. Jones also published an English language version of the poem.

CAISSA
or
The Game at Chess- a Poem.
(written in the year 1763, by Sir William Jones)

(pronounced ky-eé-sah)

Of armies on the chequer’d field array’d,

And guiltless war in pleasing form display’d;

When two bold kings contend with vain alarms,

In ivory this, and that in ebon arms;

Sing, sportive maids, that haunt the sacred hill

Of Pindus, and the fam’d Pierian rill.

Thou, joy of all below, and all above,

Mild Venus, queen of laughter, queen of love;

Leave thy bright island, where on many a rose

And many a pink thy blooming train repose:

Assist me, goddess! since a lovely pair

Command my song, like thee devinely fair.

Near yon cool stream, whose living waters play,

And rise translucent in the solar ray;

Beneath the covert of a fragrant bower,

Where spring’s nymphs reclin’d in calm retreat,

And envying blossoms crouded round their seat;

Here Delia was enthron’d, and by her side

The sweet Sirena, both in beauty’s pride:

Thus shine two roses, fresh with early bloom,

That from their native stalk dispense perfume;

Their leaves unfolding to the dawning day

Gems of the glowing mead, and eyes of May.

A band of youths and damsels sat around,

Their flowing locks with braided myrtle bound;

Agatis, in the graceful dance admir’d,

And gentle Thyrsis, by the muse inspir’d;

With Sylvia, fairest of the mirthful train;

And Daphnis, doom’d to love, yet love in vain.

Now, whilst a purer blush o’erspreads her cheeks,

With soothing accents thus Sirena speaks:

“The meads and lawns are ting’d with beamy light,

And wakeful larks begin their vocal flight;

Whilst on each bank the dewdrops sweetly smile;

What sport, my Delia, shall the hours beguile?

Whall heavenly notes, prolong’d with various art,

Charm the fond ear, and warm the rapturous heart?

At distance shall we view the sylvan chace?

Or catch with silken lines the finny race?”

Then Delia thus: “Or rather, since we meet

By chance assembled in this cool retreat,

In artful contest let our warlike train

Move well-directed o’er the field preside:

No prize we need, our ardour to inflame;

We fight with pleasure, if we fight for fame.”

The nymph consents: the maids and youths prepare

To view the combat, and the sport to share:

But Daphnis most approv’d the bold design,

Whom Love instructed, and the tuneful Nine.

He rose, and on the cedar table plac’d

A polish’d board, with differing colours grac’d;

Squares eight times eight in equal order lie;

These bright as snow, those dark with sable dye;

Like the broad target by the tortoise born,

Or like the hide by spotted panthers worn.

Then from a chest, with harmless heroes stor’d,

O’er the smooth plain two well-wrought hosts he pour’d;

The champions burn’d their rivals to assail,

Twice eight in black, twice eight in milkwhite mail;

In shape and station different, as in name,

Their motions various, not their power the same.

Say, muse! (for Jove has nought from thee conceal’d)

Who form’d the legions on the level field?

High in the midst the reverend kings appear,

And o’er the rest their pearly scepters rear:

One solemn step, majestically slow,

They gravely move, and shun the dangerous foe;

If e’er they call, the watchful subjects spring,

And die with rapture if they save their king;

On him the glory of the day depends,

He once imprison’d, all the conflict ends.

The queens exulting near their consorts stand;

Each bears a deadly falchion in her hand;

Now here, now there, they bound with furious pride,

And thin the trmbling ranks from side to side;

Swift as Camilla flying o’er the main,

Or lightly skimming o’er the dewy plain:

Fierce as they seem, some bold Plebeian spear

May pierce their shield, or stop their full career.

The valiant guards, their minds on havock bent,

Fill the next squares, and watch the royal tent;

Tho’ weak their spears, tho’ dwarfish be their height,

Compact they move, the bulwark of the fight,

To right and left the martial wings display

Their shining arms, and stand in close array.

Behold, four archers, eager to advance,

Send the light reed, and rush with sidelong glance;

Through angles ever they assault the foes,

True to the colour, which at first they chose.

Then four bold knights for courage-fam’d and speed,

Each knight exalted on a prancing steed:

Their arching course no vulgar limit knows,

Tranverse they leap, and aim insidious blows:

Nor friends, nor foes, their rapid force restrain,

By on quick bound two changing squares they gain;

From varing hues renew the fierce attack,

And rush from black to white, from white to black.

Four solemn elephants the sides defend;

Benearth the load of ponderous towers they bend:

In on unalter’d line they tempt the fight;

Now crush the left, and now o’erwhelm the right.

Bright in the front the dauntless soldiers raise

Their polish’d spears; their steely helmets blaze:

Prepar’d they stand the daring foe to strike,

Direct their progress, but their wounds oblique.

Now swell th’ embattled troups with hostile rage,

And clang their shields, impatient to engage;

When Daphnis thus: A varied plain behold,

Where fairy kings their mimick tents unfold,

As Oberon, and Mab, his wayward queen,

Lead forth their armies on the daisied green.

No mortal hand the wond’rous sport contriv’d,

By gods invents, and from gods deriv’d;

From them the British nymphs receiv’d the game,

And play ech morn beneath the crystal Thame;

Hear then the tale, which they to Colin sung,

As idling o’er the lucid wave he hung.

A lovely dryad rang’d the Thracian wild,

Her air enchanting, and her aspect mild:

To chase the bounding hart was all her joy,

Averse from Hymen, and the Cyprian boy;

O’er hills an valleys was her beauty fam’d,

And fair Caissa was the damsel nam’d.

Mars saw the maid; with deep surprize he gaz’d,

Admir’d her shape, and every gesture prais’d:

His golden bow the child of Venus bent,

And through his breast a piecing arrow sent.

The reed was hope; the feathers, keen desire;

The point, her eyes; the barbs, ethereal fire.

Soon to the nymph he pour’d his tender strain;

The haughtly dryad scorn’d his amorous pain:

He told his woes, where’er the maid he found,

And still he press’d, yet still Caissa frown’d;

But ev’n her frowns (ah, what might smiles have done!)

Fir’d all his soul, and all his senses won.

He left his car, by raging tigers drawn,

And lonely wander’d o’er the dusky lawn;

Then lay desponding near a murmuring stream,

And fair Caissa was his plaintive theme.

A naiad heard him from her mossy bed,

And through the crystal rais’d her placid head;

Then mildly spake: “O thou, whom love inspires,

Thy tears will nourish, not allay thy fires.

The smiling blossoms drink the pearly dew;

And ripening fruit the feather’d race pursue;

The scaly shoals devour the silken weeds;

Love on our sighs, and on our sorrow feeds.

Then weep no more; but, ere thou canst obtain

Balm to thy wounds, and solace to thy pain,

With gentle art thy martial look beguile;

Be mild, and teach thy rugged brow to smile.

Canst thou no play, no soothing game devise;

To make thee lovely in the damsel’s eyes?

So may thy prayers assuage the scornful dame,

And ev’n Caissa own a mutual frame.”

Kind nymph, said Mars, thy counsel I approve;

Art, only art, her ruthless breast can move.

but when? or how? They dark discourse explain:

So may thy stream ne’er swell with gushing rain;

So may thy waves in one pure current flow,

And flowers eternal on thy border blow!”

To whom the maid replied with smiling mien:

“Above the palace of the Paphian queen

Love’s brother dwells, a boy of graceful port,

By gods nam’d Euphron, and by mortals Sport:

Seek him; to faithful ears unfold thy grief,

And hope, ere morn return, a sweet relief.

His temple hangs below the azure skies;

Seest thou yon argent cloud? ‘Tis there it lies.”

This said, she sunk beneath the liquid plain,

And sought the mansion of her blue-hair’d train.

Meantime the god, elate with heart-felt joy,

Had reach’d the temple of the sportful boy;

He told Caissa’s charms, his kindled fire,

The naiad’s counsel, and his warm desire.

“Be swift, he added, give my passion aid;

A god requests.” – He spake, and Sport obey’d.

He fram’d a tablet of celestial mold,

Inlay’d with squares of silver and of gold;

Then of two metals form’d the warlike band,

That here compact in show of battle stand;

He taught the rules that guide the pensive game,

And call’d it Cassa from the dryad’s name:

(Whence Albion’s sons, who most its praise confess,

Approv’d the play, and nam’d it thoughtful Chess.)

The god delighted thank’d indulgent Sport;

Then grasp’d the board, and left his airy court.

With radiant feet he pierc’d the clouds; nor stay’d,

Till in the woods he saw the beauteous maid:

Tir’d with the chase the damsel set reclin’d,

Her girdle loose, her bosom unconfin’d.

He took the figure of a wanton faun,

And stood before her on the flowery lawn;

Then show’d his tablet: pleas’d the nymph survey’d

The lifeless troops in glittering ranks display’d;

She ask’d the wily sylvan to explain

The various motions of the splendid train;

With eager heart she caught the winning lore,

And thought ev’n Mars less hateful than before;

“What spell,” said she, “deceiv’d my careless mind?

The god was fair, and I was most unkind.”

She spoke, and saw the changing faun assume

A milder aspect, and a fairer bloom;

His wreathing horns, that from his temples grew,

Flow’d down in curls of bright celestial hue;

The dappled hairs, that veil’d his loveless face,

Blaz’d into beams, and show’d a heavenly grace;

The shaggy hide, that mantled o’er his breast,

Was soften’d to a smooth transparent vest,

That through its folds his vigorous bosom show’d,

And nervous limbs, where youthful ardour glow’d:

(Had Venus view’d him in those blooming charms,

Not Vulcan’s net had forc’d her from his arms.)

With goatlike feet no more he mark’d the ground,

But braided flowers his silken sandals bound.

The dryad blush’d; and, as he press’d her, smil’d,

Whilst all his cares one tender glance beguil’d.

He ends: To arms, the maids and striplings cry;

To arms, the groves and sounding vales reply.

Sirena led to war the swarthy crew,

And Delia those that bore the lily’s hue.

Who first, O muse, began the bold attack;

The white refulgent, or the mournful black?

Fair Delia first, as favoring lots ordain,

Moves her pale legions tow’rd the sable train:

From thought to thought her lively fancy flies,

Whilst o’er the board she darts her sparkling eyes.

At length the warrior moves with haughty strides;

Who from the plain the snowy king divides:

With equal haste his swarthy rival bounds;

His quiver rattles, and his buckler sounds:

Ah! hapless youths, with fatal warmth you burn;

Laws, ever fix’d, forbid you to return.

then from the wing a short-liv’d spearman flies,

Unsafely bold, and see! he dies, he dies:

The dark-brow’d hero, with one vengeful blow

Of life and place deprives his ivory foe.

Now rush both armies o’er the burnish’d field,

Hurl the swift dart, and rend the bursting shield.

Here furious knights on fiery coursers prance,

but see! the white-rob’d Amazon beholds

Where the dark host its opening van unfolds:

Soon as her eye discerns the hostile maid,

By ebon shield, and ebon helm betray’d;

Seven squares she passed with majestic mien,

And stands triumphant o’er the falling queen.

Perplex’d, and sorrowing at his consort’s fate,

The monarch burn’d with rage, despair, and hate:

Swift from his zone th’ avenging blade he drew,

And, mad with ire, the proud virago slew.

Meanwhile sweet smiling Delia’s wary king

Retir’d from fight behind the circling wing.

Long time the war in equal balance hung;

Till, unforseen, an ivory courser sprung,

And, wildly prancing in an evil hour,

Attack’d at once the monarch and the tower:

Sirena blush’d; for, as the rules requir’d,

Her injur’d sovereign to his tent retir’d;

Whilst her lost castle leaves his threatening height,

And adds new glory to th’ exulting knight.

At this, pale fear oppress’d the drooping maid,

And on her cheek the rose began to fade:

A crystal tear, that stood prepar’d to fall,

She wip’d in silence, and conceal’d from all;

From all but Daphnis; He remark’d her pain,

And saw the weakness of her ebon train;

Then gently spoke: “Let me your loss supply,

And either nobly win, or nobly dir;

Me oft has fortune crown’d with fair success,

And led to triumph in the fields of Chess.”

He said: the willing nymph her place resign’d,

And sat at distance on the bank reclin’d.

Thus when Minerva call’d her chief to arms,

And Troy’s high turret shook with dire alarms,

The Cyprian goddess wounded left the plain,

And Mars engag’d a mightier force in vain.

Strait Daphnis leads his squadron to the field;

(To Delia’s arms ’tis ev’n a joy to yield.)

Each guileful snare, and subtle art he tries,

But finds his heart less powerful than her eyes:

Wisdom and strength superior charms obey;

And beauty, beauty, wins the long-fought day.

By this a hoary chief, on slaughter bent,

Approach’d the gloomy king’s unguarded tent;

Where, late, his consort spread dismay around,

Now her dark corse lies bleeding on the ground.

Hail, happy youth! they glories not unsung

Shall live eternal on the poet’s tongue;

For thou shalt soon receive a splendid change,

And o’er the plain with nobler fury range.

The swarthy leaders saw the storm impend,

And strove in vain their sovereign to defend:

Th’ invader wav’d his silver lance in air,

And flew like lightning to the fatal square;

His limbs dilated in a moment grew

To stately height, and widen’d to the view;

More fierce his look, more lion-like his mien,

Sublime he mov’d, and seem’d a warrior queen.

As when the sage on some unfolding plant

Has caught a wandering fly, or frugal ant,

His hand the microscopic frame applies,

And lo! a bright hair’d monster meets his eyes;

He sees new plumes in slender cases roll’d;

Here stain’d with azure, there bedropp’d with gold;

Thus, on the alter’d chief both armies gaze,

And both the kings are fix’d with deep amaze.

The sword, which arm’d the snow-white maid before,

He noew assumes, and hurls the spear no more;

The springs indignant on the dark-rob’d band,

And knights and archers feel his deadly hand.

Now flies the monarch of the sable shield,

His legions vanquish’d, o’er the lonely field:

So when the morn, by rosy coursers drawn,

With pearls and rubies sows the verdant lawn,

Whilst each pale star from heaven’s blue vault retires,

Still Venus gleams, and last of all expires.

He hears, where’er he moves, the dreadful sound;

Check the deep vales, and Check the woods rebound.

No place remains: he sees the certain fate,

And yields his throne to ruin, and Checkmate.

A brighter blush o’erspreads the damsel’s cheeks,

And mildly thus the conquer’d stripling speaks:

“A double triumph, Delia, hast thou won,

By Mars protected, and by Venus’ son;

The first with conquest crowns thy matchless art,

The second points those eyes at Daphnis’ heart.”

She smil’d; the nymphs and amorous youths arise,

And own that beauty gain’d the nobler prize.

Low in their chest the mimic troops were lay’d,

And peaceful slept the sable hero’s shade

chessinpark

chessgame

I think Caïssa was with me in this game…haha.. I played against one of my all time favourite players. We always have five games going at any one time and I always try to save my Knights. In this end position, you can see why I do save them whenever I can. I know most players prefer Bishops, but I always prefer my Knights! See the pgn-file which I’ve copied here to look at.

Now, for another all-time-favourite…the music of Ravel…the ostinato from Bolero, though I do apologise for the funny sound you will hear.



Boléro became Ravel’s most famous composition, much to the surprise of the composer, who had predicted that most orchestras would refuse to play it. It is usually played as a purely orchestral work, only rarely being staged as a ballet.

The Chess game.


1.e4 e5 2.Qh5 d6 3.Bc4 Qe7 4.Nc3 Be6 5.Nd5 Qd7 6.Nxc7  Qxc7 7.Bxe6 Nf6 8.Qf5 fxe6 9.Qxe6  Be7 10.Nf3 Nbd7 11.Ng5 O-O-O 12.Nf7 Rhe8 13.Nxd8 Kxd8 14.d3 h6 15.Qf7 Rg8 16.O-O g5 17.Qb3 Nc5 18.Qc3 b6 19.b4 Na4 20.Qxc7  Kxc7 21.c4 Nc3 22.Re1 Kd7 23.Bb2 Na4 24.Ba3 a6 25.Rab1 Nc3 26.Rb2 b5 27.c5 Na4 28.Rc2 Rc8 29.Re3 dxc5 30.bxc5 Bxc5 31.d4 exd4 32.Rh3 h5 33.Bxc5 Nxc5 34.e5 g4 35.Rg3 Nfe4 36.Ra3 h4 37.f3 gxf3 38.gxf3 Ng5 39.f4 Nf7 40.Rh3 Nh6 41.Rxh4 Nf5 42.Rh7  Kc6 43.Rh5 Ne3 44.Rd2 Rg8  45.Rg5 Rxg5  46.Kf2 Rg2  47.Ke1 Kd5 48.Rxg2 Nxg2  49.Kf1 Nxf4 50.Kf2 Kxe5 51.h4 Ne4  52.Kf3 d3

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Classical music and chess are two of my “melodies of love”..if you know what I mean..and today I want to share Dolannes Melody, by the master himself, the French artist, Jean-Claude Borelly! If you’re a chess player, try playing a game while listening to this music, you surely will have a good game. Wasn’t it Philidor that was a composer too…and a world chess champion! Today’s chess game, which I played on  Chesscube, was really one of  “those” games – for me…a plain silly start. No excuses. Sometimes you play (well me, not you) and you make certain moves and you don’t know what on earth caused you those moves. If you look at these images, you will see what I mean. You see, this is “typical-me”..Frailty, thy name is woman!) not thinking about the game, but just playing for the fun of it..and then, suddenly, the tables get turned…and your opponent refused to move as he knows he’s in trouble…and..”The rest is silence.” I wonder if you will identify some quotes I’ve used here and know from which play? You can now play through two games interactively. Down in this post you will find the links to play through it. Game 2 is a game I’ve played earlier tonight on Chesscube. My opponent is a 1708 strong player. I beat him in our first round and in the second I lost due to a silly Knight-move! If it wasn’t for my Knight-move, I could have beaten him, but that shows you again.. absent-minded-me! Please click on the images for a larger view.

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You will see how he used his Knight (my favourite piece – see how I used my Knights later on!) to “spoil” it for me! –“O! what a rogue and peasant slave am I!”

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–“Let me be cruel, not unnatural; I will speak daggers to her, but use none.”

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“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”

chessd

..hmmm…first Knight to move in with a Knight-fork…”Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me. You would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery.”

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..and my second ready to slay his King..another Knight-fork…gmf! that will teach him to chase my Dame around and slaughter my men! –“The rest is silence..

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And my dearest opponent begged me to stop..and on his knees he prayed his last prayers…his poor King in rags! –“The play’s the thing, wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the King!”  –“Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince; And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

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Do you think it’s true what Kasparov said?

Game 1: Please click HERE to play through the game. The game will open in a new window.

1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nb5 Kd7 5. Nxc7 Rb8 6. Nb5 Ra8 7. Bc7 Qe8 8. Be5 Ne4 9. Nc7 Qd8 10. Nxa8 f6 11. Bc7 Qe8 12. Bf4 e6 13. Nc7 Qe7 14. Nb5 Qf7 15. Nd6 Bxd6 16. Bxd6 Nxd6 17. e3 a6 18. Nf3 Rd8 19. Qd2 Ne4 20. Qd3 g6 21. h3 f5 22. a4 Nb4 23. Qb3 Qe7 24. c3 Nc6 25. c4 Na5 26. Qb6 Nc6 27. b4 Nxb4 28. cxd5 Nc2+ 29. Kd1 Nxa1 30. Ne5+ Ke8 31. f3 Nf2+ 32. Kc1 Nxh1 33. Bb5+ axb5 34. Qxb5+ Bd7 35. Qxb7 Qa3+ 36. Kd2 Nb3+ 37. Kc2 Na5 0-1

Game 2: Please click HERE to play through the game.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Bg4 4. d5 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 a6 6. Nc3 h6 7. Bd3 Nf6 8. O-O Nbd7 9. Re1 Qe7 10. Qd1 Nb6 11. b3 Qd7 12. a4 Be7 13. a5 Nc8 14. b4 O-O 15. Ne2 Nh7 16. Ng3 Bg5 17. Bxg5 Nxg5 18. Qh5 Ne7 19. Be2 Ng6 20. Bg4 Qd8 21. Nf5 Nf4 22. Qh4 Qf6 23. Qg3 Rab8 24. h4 Nh7 25. Bd1 Ng6 26. Nxh6+ gxh6 27. h5 Kh8 28. hxg6 Qxg6 29. Qh3 Rg8 30. Bf3 Ng5 31. Qg3 Nxf3+ 32. Qxf3 Rg7 33. Re3 Rbg8 34. g3 Rh7 35. Qe2 h5 36. Rd1 h4 37. Rdd3 h3 38. Kh2 Qg4 39. Qxg4 Rxg4 40. Rc3 f6 41. Re2 Rgg7 42. Rf3 Rf7 43. Rf5 Rh6 44. g4 Kg7 45. Rh5 Rxh5 46. gxh5 Kh6 47. Kxh3 Kxh5 48. Kg2 Rg7+ 49. Kf1 Rg5 50. Re3 f5 51. Rh3+ Kg4 52. Rg3+ Kf4 53. Rxg5 Kxg5 54. exf5 Kxf5 55. Ke2 Ke4 56. Kd2 Kxd5 57. Kd3 e4+ 58. Ke3 Ke5 59. c3 d5 60. f4+ Kf5 61. Kd4 c6 62. Ke3 Ke6 63. Ke2 Kf5 64. Ke3 Kf6 65. Ke2 Ke6 66. Ke3 Kf5 67. Kd4 Kg4 68. Ke5 e3 69. f5 e2 70. f6 e1=Q+ 71. Kd6 Qg3+ 72. Kc5 Qc7 0-1

Update: Game 3…Another game I played on Chess cube….my opponent’s time ran out…although he was about to lose the game too…please click HERE to play through the game where I played white. Out of desperation he forced me to capture his Queen in order to have a lost myself, but I didn’t mind that much as I knew I had a Pawn-advantage. I loved the position of my Knights during the middle-game as I could use them effectively.

1. d4 h5 2. e4 e6 3. e5 f5 4. Bf4 Ne7 5. Bg5 h4 6. Bb5 b6 7. Bxe7 Bxe7 8. h3 Bb7 9. f3 Bb4+ 10. c3 Be7 11. Nd2 a6 12. Ba4 b5 13. Bc2 Nc6 14. Nb3 b4 15. c4 d5 16. c5 Bg5 17. Bd3 Be3 18. Be2 Bxd4 19. Nxd4 Nxe5 20. Nxe6 Qd7 21. Nd4 Rh5 22. Qd2 Rg5 23. Qxg5 Qe7 24. Qxf5 Rd8 25. Kf2 Bc8 26. Qc2 c6 27. Re1 Qg5 28. b3 Qg3+ 29. Kf1 Kf7 30. Bd3 Re8 31. Re2 Qg5 32. Bf5 Bxf5 33. Nxf5 Re6 34. Nd4 Nd3 35. Nxe6 Qc1+ 36. Qxc1 Nxc1 37. Nd8+ 1-0

Now, for the climax! Do enjoy Dolannes Melody and if you like it, I’ve got a link – Grumpy Boss’s blog – where you can download it from rapidshare. But you also have to download the Rar-software to unzip it…good luck, it’s worth doing it for a wonderful piece of music like this, and you not only get the one track, but the complete album! Follow the link.
Dolannes Melody
Jean-Claude Borelly

http://grumpyscorner.blogspot.com/2007/08/jean-claude-borelly-dolannes-melody.html

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This is the Youtube-movie with Dolannes Melody.

The Piano version

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African Junior Chess Championhips 2008_2009… Please scroll down a little bit..I do apologise for this mixed post! I didn’t know I was going to have time to blog the African Juniors and didn’t want to start a new entry…

Melissa Greeff and Kareim Wageih - Winners of the African Junior CC 2008_9

Melissa Greeff and Kareim Wageih - Winners of the African Junior CC 2008_9

 Finally I got my picture! Image from the Official site of Chessa. Melissa Greeff – from South Africa and Kareim Wageih – from Egypt, are the winners of the 2008_9 African Junior Chess Championship that took place in South Africa. For a larger view you may want to click on the image. See more images at the bottom of this post and 5 pages of lovely photos on the official site (link in this post).

I’m not in a mood to explain anything about my own games in this post. Ask me why…and I’ll tell you it’s because of politiciants ranted about what was written in a book they’ve read, believed all the rubbish and think they know everything after what some stupid guy wrote! (ok, that was a couple of  years ago, but still…the idea! who says what was was written in that book was the truth anyway! You should go and visit a place to see what’s going on before you make any accusations or act upon what was written in a book! Silly – if you ask me!) Well, you shouldn’t ask me more on this, unless you want to see me ranting tomorrow whole day!  And those same “people” won’t move a finger about what’s going on in Zimbabwe. Could somebody please write them a book about Zimbabwe!!! People are dying of hunger, calling for help…much worse is going on than what was written by “someone”, but do they care…no! They think they care..does anyone ever really care what’s going on in another country…who cares about Mugabe killing his own people? Is he God-sent..that they don’t do anything?

Ek wip sommer my agterend vir hierdie Engelse Barones wat dink dat as jy ‘n boek lees, dat alles in ‘n boek waar is…sy was seker lekker blond gewees. Dis alles in die hansard, skree as jy die link wil hê, maar maak gereed om jou te vererg.

 Ok, I’ll shut-up and keep my thoughts to chess…that’s much better – for my soul at least. I’ve decided to upload only a few images about games I’ve played recently..some good games, some silly stupid games.  Chess Cube is a quite newish chess site which is worth to check out. You can follow this link or the link on my blog’s side bar – with the white knight’s-head. Links in the post will open in a new window.

 The Hastings Chess tournament is also now on and on THIS LINK you will find games from the 1920’s till 2004 played at Hastings tournaments. Games can also be downloaded. I also have a few chess graphics of games played by earlier Chess Grandmasters, which I dug out on Chess World. Sometimes if I play through these games, I think..oh, that’s easy, or that looks like such an easy game, or…hmm..I think I can play a game like that too! but…gmf..when it comes to the real game…it’s not always so easy peasy, but I guess I need to follow the “rules” more, as I’m  following my “own” rules. I’m playing not too much now, but prefer to go on Chess Cube for a quick real time game, there’s always someone to play with. I do like Chess Cube’s interface, it’s cool.  Chess Cube is a South African site, also now a site which the English Chess use for their chess club. At the bottom of this post you will find a link to the English Chess-forum-site and the image with the link shows you the page you get when you go to “their” club…but once you’ve clicked on “log in”..it takes you straight away to the main page of Chess Cube. On Chess Cube you can also join your country’s chat room, if you like. The African Junior Chess Championship is now taking place in South Africa! You will find a link to the official site with more information in this post too.
checkmate

Chess.com-game..I played white. I guess it was  a good checkmate in this game.

 

bezerker
Chess.com-game..I played white in this game, my American opponent wasn’t “impressed” with my play…by that I think you know what I mean..

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Sneumann vs Steinitz

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Maroczy vs Pillsbury 

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Steinitz vs Lasker

mewhite
Chess.com-game..this game wasn’t a  good game for me…although it might look like it was.

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Chess Cube-game..I like the position here..I played white in this game too..how come are all these games I’m blogging games where I played white!…just wondering..

Flags of the African countries taking part in the championships

Flags of the African countries taking part in the championships

African Junior Chess Championship: 28th December 2008 – 6th January 2009.
Please click here for the African Juniors link for more information.

The Amanzintaba Resort at Bronkhorstspruit, South Africa, where the African Junior Chess Championships are taking place. Amanzintaba means: “Water from the mountain”, this link will take you to the resort’s homepage. Bronkhorstspruit is near Pretoria, about 30 mins’ drive on the N4 Highway. Thaba in Northern Sotho means “mountain”…I’m not sure if they’ve changed the spelling of “thaba” in this resort’s name..this is my knowledge of Northern Sotho.

schedule

African Junior Chess Championship: Schedule

 

Girls top 5 after round 7

African Junior Chess Championships 2008_9: Girls top 5 after round 7

Open section after round 7

African Junior Chess Championships 2008_9: Open section after round 7

South African girls taking the lead in the African Juniors- girls section

South African girls taking the lead in the African Juniors- girls section

Open section after round 8

African Junior Chess Championship: Open section after round 8

 African Junior Chess Championships: Round 9 – The final round…
  

Round 9 - South African girls taking the first 5 places, well done!

Results: Round 9 - South African girls taking the first 5 places, well done!

Round 9, the final round. Egypt taking the lead again.

Results: Open section: Round 9, the final round. Egypt taking the lead again.

For a larger view, please click on the images

For a larger view, please click on the images

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For more images about the African Juniors…please follow my link to the official site in this post. There are 5 pages of lovely pics to see, also pics about their free day.
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Chess Cube interface…ahh…you can see I played black here!
Please click here for the English Chess Forum link. The link will open in a new window. English chess -url…http://ecfclub.chesscube.com/
chesscubeenglishchess

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Image: Chesscentral.com

I believe this is a good combination: chess, poetry, art and music! I’ve started recently reading Dean’s poetry blog and glad that I’ve discovered his blog. This poem in this post, is today’s entry on his blog and I’ve really enjoyed it and thought to share it with you. If you’re a lover of poetry, make sure to visit his blog, if you don’t, you will regret it! If you don’t like poetry, then you still should visit his blog and you will immediately fall in love with his poems! I have a present for you today too, let’s call it an early Christmas present if you like, a composition by Jim Brickman. Finally, for my chess-lovers (and those who think they might become chess-lovers!) I’ve got a few games here (do check back as I have about ten more to blog in this entry!) played a few days ago in the Dresden Olympiad. This post is almost as good as “wine women and song!”:) All links will open in a new window.

Remember me to the world
And all the beautiful girls
I never kissed; if there’s one regret
That is it: that I left any lovelies’
Lips unblessed, her heart repressed

Remember me to the wind, which
Blows wherever it goes; still, or not
Any feeling does not cost, but what you
Do with it: recall I am that
Innocent, awake to only wonder told

Remember me to the sun; the heat,
The blaze, worries public or hidden,
I have had them all, unbidden: most
Of all when you see that woman or girl,
Remember me, my dear, to the blessed world

©Dean J. Baker
To read more wonderful poetry, please click
HERE to read on Dean Baker’s blog! Chess=love+poetry+music+art=chess!

Read more about Dean on his biography-link on his blog!

Over 500 poems and prose poems published since 1972 in over 130 literary publications in Canada, the USA, England, Australia, New Zealand, etc., such as Descant, Carleton Literary Review, Poetry WLU, The Prairie Journal, Freelance, Nexus, Bitterroot, Oxalis, Bogg, Aileron, RE:AL, Art Times, Pegasus, Impetus, On The Bus, and many others. More have been published in newspapers, magazines, online and in anthologies, recorded and paper.


Music: Jim Brickman: Dream comes true

Please click HERE to play through the game of Nyback from Finland vs Carlsen played in round 6, Dresden 2008.

carlsen

Carlsen

Please click HERE to play through the game of Dominguez from Cuba vs Gata Kamsky in round 6, Dresden 2008.

This game of Etienne Bacrot was played in round 7 against Sasikiran from India.

Click HERE to play through the game of Boris Gelfand from Israel vs Elexei Shirov of Spain in round 7.

Please click HERE to play through the game of one of my favourite players, Ivanchuk vs Wang of China.

ivanchuk

Ivanchuk

Click HERE to play through Kamsky’s game played in round 7 against Peter Leko.

Play through the game of Michael Adams against Radjabov played in round 7, Dresden.

Please click HERE to play through the game of Yelena Dembo, from Greece,  played in round 7 at the Olympiad.

yelenadembo

Yelena Dembo

Please click HERE to play through the game of Cheparinov in round 8, Dresden.

To play through a game of Topalov played in round 8, click on the link!
Please click HERE to play through the game of David Howell from England played in round 9.

david-navara

image: Greekchess.com..David Navara

Please click here to play through the game of David Navara played in round 9.

To play through the game of NIGEL SHORT, played in round 9, click on the link!

Image: chessbase..Nigel Short

Please click HERE to play through the game of Peter Svidler played in round 9 at the Dresden Olympiad in Germany.


Samuel Bak Chess Art. See my “chess humour”- page for more chess art from Samuel and his link.

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Please click HERE to see more results of games played in round 1 and round 2. The link will open in a new window. At the bottom of this post you will find a link to play through games of round 5, where South Africa played Luxembourg.

On this link you can play through games played in round 6. The link will open in a new window.

http://chessaleeinlondon.blogspot.com/2008/11/south-africa-dresden-and-round-6.html

 

Click on the top image/logo to access the official site of Dresen 2008, it will open in a new window and on the “live” image for the live games.

 

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South African players: Men

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South African players: Ladies

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Dresden Schedule

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The South African women’s team at Dresden

All images in this post: HERE the official chess blog of Chess SA. The link will open in a new window.

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Carmen de Jager

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Monique Sischy

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Melissa Greeff

jenine-ellappen

Jenine Ellappen

anzel-solomons

Anzel Solomons

henry-steel

Henry Steel

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Watu Kobese

Please click HERE to play through a game of Watu Kobese against Jennifer Shahade played in Philadelphia in June 1998. The game was Kobese’s.

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Kenny Solomon

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Johannes Mabusela

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Daniel Cawdery

Some of the round 3 results- click on images for  larger view

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Melissa Greeff round 3 move 39 …0-1

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Melissa Greeff round 3 move list

 daniel-round-3

Daniel Cawdery round 3 end position 1/2

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Daniel Cawdery round 3 move list

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Monique Sischy round 3 end position 0-1

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Monique Sischy round 3 move list

Round 4  16 Nov women’s team against Norway and men’s team against Pakistan

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Melissa round 4 move 18

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Jenine round 4 move 17

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Anzel round 4 move 17

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Monique round 4 move 17

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Daniel round 4 move 17

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Henry round 4 move 14

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Kenny round 4 move 12

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Johannes round 4 move 12

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South Africa vs Pakistan Images from players: chesssaol.wordpress.com

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South African Ladies’ team vs Latvia

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Results of the ladies’ team after round 4

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Results of the men’s team after round 4

Round 5 results: South Africa vs Luxembourg 17th November 2008

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Henry Steel vs Jeitz Christian Dresden round 5…1-0

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Mietek Bakalarz vs Kenny Solomon Dresden round 5 …0-1

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Pierre Gengler vs Johannes Mabusela Dresden round 5…1/2

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Watu Kobese vs Fred Berend Dresden round 5…1-0

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Watu Kobese round 5 move list

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Kaydanovich vs Monique Sischy Dresden round 5…0-1

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Round 5 Monique Sischy move list

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Anzel Solomons vs Gelina Melnik Dresden round 5 …1-0
Please click HERE to play interactively through the games of round 5. The link will open in a new window.

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Results: Ladies Round 6 South Africa vs Egypt

round-6-men

Results: Men Round 6 South Africa vs Italy

 

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Click on the top image/logo to access the official site of Dresen 2008, it will open in a new window and on the “live” image for the live games.
Click HERE for round 1 live games. The link will open in a new window. Then click on the country and it will take you to a window where you can click on “live”. There is a separate link to the Women’s section.

Please click on THIS LINK to see more images of the South African team at Dresden and for more results. The link will open in a new window.

„There is an incredible treasure of all kinds in this beautiful place” wrote Goethe about Dresden. Today Saxony’s state capital has rebuilt its glamorous position step by step. Dresden as cultural metropole is a worldwide center of attraction – and a strong location for economy and science. Dresden’s microelectronics cluster (ZMD, AMD, Infineon), Fraunhofer Institutes, the Max-Planck Institutes, the Technical University and the College of Arts represent an environment offering a mentality which is also determining for chess. Thus, Dresden is, for example, City of Science 2006.

Intelligence has here been at home already very early. 1083 the Bohemian daughter of a king, Judith, brought along a precious chess game as dowry to Saxony. Therewith, Dresden’s match as a chess city was begun. Alone since 1991 210 international and national relevant chess events could be experienced. Stars like Anatoly Karpov or Garry Kasparov are in Dresden oftentimes. Even the castling is close by to relax.

Elena Winkelmann is one of Germany’s greatest chess talents. Here she is playing in front of the emblem of the EURO 2007 and the Chess Olympiad, the Crown Gate of the Zwinger.

A dignified framework: the venue of the Olympiad 2008 in the ICD Dresden is located directly on the river banks on the old side of the city. Church of our Lady, Semper Opera, Castle, Bruhl’s Terrace – the famous baroque ensemble is only a few steps away. And every visitor right away feels the special flair of hospitality and love for cultural engagement in the whole city. Read on the Official Site more about Dresden.

Image: Dresden2008

Please click HERE to access the official site where you can locate your country to view the players/teams that will take part. The links in this post will all open in a new window.Please click HERE to read about Jennifer Shahade’s visit to South Africa and you can see images from her and her visit.

Simen Agdestein, Norwegian Grandmaster toured South Africa during March and said SA has great chess talent, the problem South Africans face…is the fact that they are far from Europe to play tournaments! You can see his image in this post where he played chess in a restaurant in South Africa.

chess-2

Kenny Solomon

Carmen de Jager, Anzel Solomons and Monique Sischy

Melissa Greeff

Image chessbase :Henry Steel

Image: chessbase:Jenine Elappen, Anzel Solomons, Melissa Greeff

South African players

Image: Chessbase..Dresden Chess 2008…map with details

1. Congress Center Dresden (Playing Hall)
2. Hotel Maritim Hotel
3. Westin Bellevue
4. Museum Japanese Palais
5. Art‘otel
6. Freiberger Arena (Opening Ceremony)

Dresden: Schedule…Info: Chessbase

Image: spotlightgermany.com

Watu Kobese….Image: farm1.static.flickr.com/5/4967409_aa51644369

Please click HERE to play through a game of Watu Kobese against Jennifer Shahade played in Philadelphia in June 1998. The game was Kobese’s.

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Chess Art…a display at Dresden 2008 – Image: http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com

Image: dresden2008

Grootmeester Simen Agdestein van Noorweë speel ‘n potjie informele skaak in ‘n restaurant in Pretoria. Sy hoed is ‘n aandenking van Suid-Afrika. Foto: Waldo Swiegers

SA hét talent, sê skaak-grootmeester Mar 03 2008 01:21:33:830AM  – (SA)  
Neels Jackson

Suid-Afrika se skaakspelers is erg ondergegradeer.

Dís die mening van mnr. Simen Agdestein, Noorweegse grootmeester, wat die naweek saam met ’n groep van sy skaakleerlinge in Suid-Afrika aangekom het om deur die land te toer. Hulle speel die naweek ook in ’n internasionaal gegradeerde toernooi by die Hoërskool Waterkloof in Pretoria.

Agdestein sê as Suid-Afrika nie so ver van Europa was nie en meer van sy spelers kon gereeld aan internasionale toernooie deelneem, sou die land al verskeie grootmeesters opgelewer het.

Hy was op sy dag die wêreld se no. 16-speler, maar hy lê hom nou toe op skaakafrigting by ’n Noorweegse sportskool. Hy is een van nege Noorweegse grootmeesters.

Dat hy ook ander talente het, blyk daaruit dat hy sy land agt keer as doelskieter van die nasionale sokkerspan verteenwoordig het.

Hy het ook aan die Noorweegse weergawe van Strictly come dancing deelgeneem, maar sê hy het vroeg uitgeval weens ’n swak ronde met die tango.

Die sportskool waar hy skaakafrigting doen, het ’n samewerkingsooreenkoms met die Hoërskool Waterkloof se skaaksentrum gesluit. Die Noorweërs se besoek is deel van dié ooreenkoms.

Skaak help kinders volgens hom nie net met hul verstandelike ontwikkeling nie. Dit verryk ook hul lewe deurdat hulle mense op ’n ander manier leer ken.

Hy bestempel dit as ’n geson-de aktiwiteit – baie beter as rekenaarspeletjies, wat hy as “ silly ” bestempel.

http://www.news24.com/Beeld/Suid-Afrika/0,,3-975_2280944,00.html.


Image: Wikipedia..The symbol of the 6th Olympiad held in 1935 in Warshaw by J Steifer.

Birth of the Olympiad
The first Olympiad was unofficial. For the 1924 Olympics an attempt was made to include chess in the Olympics Games but this failed because of problems with distinguishing between amateur and professional players.While the 1924 Summer Olympics was taking place in Paris, the 1st unofficial Chess Olympiad also took place in Paris. FIDE was formed on Sunday, July 20, 1924, the closing day of the 1st unofficial Chess Olympiad. FIDE organised the first Official Olympiad in 1927 which took place in London.The Olympiads were occasionally held annually and at irregular intervals until World War II; since 1950 they have been held regularly every two years.

Read more about the history of the Chess Olympiad on this link which will open in a new window.


Image: Wikipedia
Bobby Fischer’s score card from his round 3 game during the Chess Olympiad in 1970…he played against Miguel Najdorf in Warshaw.

childreninnepal

Children in Nepal playing chess!   Image: susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2008/11/picture-of-the-day-global-chess.html


Dresden Opening Ceremony images


Dresden Opening Ceremony

Results: Round 1

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Dresden round 1: South Africa’s Woman’s team against Tunisia

 dresden1

Results round 1: Hong Kong vs South Africa

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Dresden round 1: England vs Turkey

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results-round-2-women-dresden-sa

Round 2 results – games played on Friday 14th November 2008

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melissa-round-2-moves

Melissa Greeff Round 2 move 19

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Melissa Greeff Round 2 draw

melissa-greeff-round-2-move-list

Melissa Greef Round 2 move list – 1/2

monique-round-2-turkey

monique-round-2-vsturkey

Monique Sischy  Round 2 move 14 – 1/2

 watu-round-2-germany

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Watu Kobese round 2 move 20

watu-kobese-round-2-dresden-end-position

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Watu Kobese Round 2 Dresden end position and move list – 1/2

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Jenine Ellappen round 2

jenine-ellappen-round-2-move-list

Jenine Ellappen Round 2 move list – 1-0

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Images: chesshouse.com

I have a couple of articles/posts on my blog about chess and the link between chess and academic performance, the  research  that was done by various people, the reasons why your child should play chess etc. Today’s article is no difference and I’ve added an article about chess and the 7 dimensions, which you might enjoy and then 3 of my own games. I’ve taken out my opponents’ nicknames this time. Two games were friendlies and the last game was a rated game. As Ray mentioned the other day on his blog- (if you love playing chess, please play him on chess.com, his blog-link is on my blog roll and you can leave him a message on his blog, but be aware, he’s no softy when it comes to chess! Don’t come back to me crying! lol!) -that I used to blog only games where my opponents were defeated…(no comments…:) Anyway…I have blogged  awhile ago some of my games where I was the complete loser!  Enjoy the games here…You will notice that I played white in all three the games. You can play through these games, the game-links will open in a new window. If you wanna play me, I do play now on chess.com. If you follow the link on my sidebar, register, then you will automatically be a friend of me and we can play!

You will also find an article you might not be able to read…that’s Afrikaans! The article is about Ezet, she took part in the World Youth Championships that ended last week in Vietnam. The link of the Saffa-players and their results is also available to be viewed. On this link here you can find the official site of the World Youth Chess Championships in Vietnam. The link will open in a new window.
http://wycc2008.vietnamchess.com/index.php

Chess Improves Academic Performance
Chess has long been recognized throughout the world as a builder of strong intellects, but only recently has the United States begun to recognize chess’s ability to improve the cognitive abilities, rational thinking and reasoning of even the least promising children. Chess brings out latent abilities that have not been reached by traditional educational means. It promotes logical thinking, instills a sense of self‑confidence and self‑worth, and improves communication and pattern recognition skills. It teaches the values of hard work, concentration, objectivity, and commitment. As former World Chess Champion Emmanuel Lasker said, “On the chessboard lies and hypocrisy do not survive long.”

In Marina, CA, an experiment with chess indicated that after only 20 days of instruction, students’ academic performance improved dramatically. George L Stephenson, chairman of the Marina JHS math department, reported that 55% of students showed significant improvement in academic performance after this brief smattering of chess instruction.

Similarly, a 5‑year study of 7th and 8th graders by Robert Ferguson of the Bradford, PA School District showed that test scores improved 173% for students regularly engaged in chess classes, compared with only 4.56% for children participating in other forms of “enrichment activities” including Future Problem Solving, Dungeons and Dragons, Problem Solving with Computers, independent study, and creative writing. A Watson‑Glaser Thinking Appraisal evaluation showed overwhelmingly that chess improved critical thinking skills more than the other methods of enrichment.

Educators at the Roberto Clemente School (C.I.S. 166) in New York report that chess has improved not only academic scores, but social performance as well. In 1988, Joyce Brown, an assistant principal and supervisor of the school’s Special Education department, and teacher Florence Mirin began studying the effect of chess on their Special Education students. When the study began, they had 15 children enrolled in chess classes; two years later they had 398‑

“The effects have been remarkable,” Brown says. “Not only have the reading and math skills of these children soared, their ability to socialize has increased substantially, too. Our studies have shown that incidents of suspension. and outside altercations have decreased by at least 60% since these children became interested in chess.”

Connie Wingate, Principal, P.S. 123 in New York, says of a New York City school chess program, “This is wonderful! This is marvelous! This is stupendous! It’s the finest thing that ever happened to this school. I am most sincere. It has been an absolute plus for the students who were directly involved as well as for the rest of the school… If I could say one thing to funders, it would be this. If they ever walked down 140th St. and 8th Ave. and had the opportunity to see where our children come from, they would know that these children deserve every single break that they can get. They are trying, through chess, to apply themselves and do something to better themselves. And that filters into the entire school and community… More than anything else, chess makes a difference… what it has done for these children is simply beyond anything that I can describe. The highest scoring student in out school is a member of the chess team. He became the highest scoring kid in the school after he joined the chess team. All four are in the top quarter of the school, and they weren’t before. Academically, they are doing much better in class, and it’s in no small part because of chess. Just how they feel about themselves, their self‑esteem, makes them all winners.”

Jo Bruno, Principal, P.S. 189, ‑Brooklyn, NY:. “In‑chess tournaments the child gets the opportunity of seeing more variety and diversity. There are kids who have more money than they have, but chess is a common denominator. They are all equal on the chessboard. I believe it is connected academically and to the intellectual development of children. I see them able to attend to something for more than an hour and a half. I am stunned. Some of them could not attend to things for more than 20 minutes.”

Jerome Fishman, Guidance Counselor, C.J.H.S 231, Queens, NY: “I like the aspect of socialization. You get into friendly, competitive activity where no one gets hurt. Instead of two bodies slamming into each other like in football, you’ve got the meeting of two minds. It’s strategic, and you use logic to plan an attack scheme. Aside from being good for the cognitive development of these youngsters, chess develops their social skills, too. It makes them feel they belong. Whenever we get a child transferred from another school who may have maladaptive behavior, our principal (Dr. Wilton Anderson) suggests chess as a way of helping him find his niche. It also helps kids learn how to be better friends. They analyze the game and talk it over afterwards. I even had a couple of kids who never had much in common start going to each other’s houses to play chess and swap Chess Life magazines. We’ve got kids literally lining up in front of the school at 6:45 am to get a little chess in before classes start.”

Source for most of the above: New York City Schools Chess Program by Christine Palm, copyright 1990
https://www.chesshouse.com/articles.asp?id=115

http://knightofchess.com/34/the-role-of-chess-in-modern-education/

http://knightofchess.com/31/chess-makes-kids-smarter/


On this link you will find these articles to read.
Articles on Chess.. The link will open in a new window.
Chess Improves Academic Performance
More Schools Learn Power of Checkmate
Chess Makes Kids Smarter
From Street Kids to Royal Knights
Role of Chess in Modern Education
One Boy’s Chess Story
Chess is the Gymnasium of the Mind
Chess and Education

World Youth Chess Championships…see the official link in top of this entry.

http://www.sajca.com/wycc2008.html Uitslae van die Suid-Afrikaanse spelers. Die link sal in ‘n nuwe venster oopmaak.
 

Ezet het aan die Wêreld Junior Skaakkampioenskappe deelgeneem en op die link kan die uitslae gevind word.
 Ezet Roos, ’n gr. 11-leerling van die Afrikaanse Hoër Meisieskool in Pretoria, gaan in Oktober vanjaar baie min van haar skoolbank sien.
Dié talentvolle skaakspeler gaan aan twee toernooie in dié maand deelneem. Sy gaan eers na Beijing vir die World Mind Games en daarna na Viëtnam om aan die Wêreldjeugkampioenskap deel te neem.

Ezet het al ses keer na dié kampioenskap gegaan en het al elke jaar sedert sy tien jaar oud was Suid-Afrikaanse kleure gekry.

Ezet het ook haar skaakvermoëns in verskeie lande ten toon gestel.

“Ek was al in Spanje, Griekeland, Rusland en Turkye. Rusland is ’n vreemde land, maar die mense speel baie goed skaak. Hulle begin baie jonger as ons speel.”

Hoewel sy meen die Oos-Europese lande se gehalte van spel is veel beter as hier, sê sy Suid-Afrikaners hoef glad nie terug te staan vir lande soos Australië of Nieu-Seeland nie.

“Ons sukkel dalk teen lande soos Rusland, maar verder doen ons heel oukei.”

Volgens haar vereis skaak ’n ander soort fiksheid as ander sportsoorte.

“Mense dink skaak is nie ’n sport nie, maar net soos ander sportsoorte is dit onvoorspelbaar. Jy kan so hard oefen soos jy wil, maar jy weet nooit wat gaan gebeur nie.

“As jy in toernooie speel, moet jy vyf uur lank konsentreer. Jy is dalk nie soos met ander sporte uitasem nie, maar dit maak my baie moeg en ná ’n wedstryd wil ek net slaap.”

http://www.news24.com/Beeld/Sport/Skolesport/0,,3-63-2372_2385625,00.html

Chess game 1

Nikita1 vs. Bg

Chess game 2

Nikita1 vs. The…

Chess game 3

Nikita1 vs. bir..

“The chessboard is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the Universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature and the player on the other side is hidden from us”
(Thomas Huxley)

 7 – Dimensions of Life article submitted by: Dr J Slobodzien The link of the article is at the bottom of the post and it will open in a new window.

1. Social / Cultural Dimension – I started seeing that your chess pieces are like family members and significant others in your life that you try to protect the best you can. We are all alike (black or white in chess) and we try to move and communicate in ways that will support our mutual goals. Unfortunately though, you end up losing the ones you love.

2. Medical/ Physical Dimension – In order to maintain a healthy body we must maintain a balance of moving (exercise), eating (our opponents pieces), and resting (knowing when not to move).

3. Mental/ Emotional Dimension – Chess forces us to think really hard about our actions, the consequences of our actions, and how our behavior affects others and the world around us. It also gives us opportunities to experience and deal with emotions – like anger, revenge, grief, and joy, etc.

4. Educational/ Occupational Dimension – Chess develops our attention span, concentration abilities, and memory – so that we can learn, be trained and skilled, and maintain satisfying work experiences.

5. Spiritual/ Religious Dimension – I didn’t notice a spiritual side to chess until one of my pawns first got transformed (born-again) into a Queen. At that point, I realized that our weakest members in life have the potential to become our strongest heroes. Chess also develops our faith in a set of organized beliefs and practices much like religion.

6. Legal/ Financial Dimension – Chess teaches us that there are consequences for not obeying the law (not playing by the rules of the game). There are also rewards for logically and systematically making the right moves in life.

7. Self-Control/ Higher Power Control Dimension- Chess teaches us that even though we may follow all the rules, all of the time – we do not have total control of our destiny (who wins the game and who loses). As Thomas Huxley so eloquently put it in his famous quote above (“the player on the other side is hidden”).

http://searchwarp.com/swa305229.htm

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Anand…vs…Kramnik


Please click HERE to play through the games of Anand/Kramnik on the site of nytimes(gambit). The link will open in a new window.


Images: Official site

 

 

 Follow THIS LINK on my blog to see the results of all their games, move-by-move, also to follow many other links to sites with games played previously, including a link to the Official site…and…on THIS LINK ..also on my blog, you can go through annotated movies of their games played through the WCC 2008. Enjoy! Links will open in a new window.

News Article from the BBC:

Anand retains world chess title

Anand said he had given one of his best-ever performances
India’s Viswanathan Anand has retained his FIDE World Chess Championship title by beating Russia’s Vladimir Kramnik in the German city of Bonn.

Anand won three games, drew seven times and lost once en route to winning the competition by 6.5 points to 4.5.

He and Kramnik will share the total prize fund of 1.5m euros ($1.94m).

Anand became FIDE world champion last year by winning a tournament in Mexico, where Kramnik was again runner-up. Anand first won the title in 2000.

Kramnik, the Classical World Chess Champion, had competed in the 2007 World Chess Federation (FIDE) world championship with the understanding that if he lost, he would get a chance to reclaim the title by playing a match against the winner in 2008.

“Vladimir pushed me into giving my all. I’ve given one of my best-ever performances here in Bonn,” Anand, 38, told the AFP news agency after his victory on Wednesday.

“I tried everything, but it just wasn’t enough. Life is like that and defeat is part of it,” Kramnik conceded.

Anand, who was born in the southern Indian city of Madras (Chennai), divides his time between India and Spain.

Known as the “Tiger from Madras”, his achievements have triggered huge interest in the game in India with chess clubs mushrooming in many parts of the country.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7698743.stm

http://gambit.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/29/anand-is-world-champion-again/

http://gambit.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/28/hold-the-coronation-kramnik-draws-game-9-wins-game-10/

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How do astronauts pass the time in between whatever it is that they do whilst they are up there in space? There’s not much room to move about, so physical activities are pretty much out. You could listen to music or read, but what if you feel the need for a bit of friendly competition with ground control?

Greg Chamitoff is a 46 year-old American astronaut currently orbiting the earth as one of the crew of the International Space Station. He also happens to be a keen amateur chess player and didn’t want a little thing like being in space to stop him playing a game or two. He therefore took a lightweight chess set into orbit with him and challenged all the various mission control centres on earth to a joint game.

Millions of miles and 30 moves later, Greg was victorious. Buoyed by his success, he has now challenged each mission control centre to an individual game.

Read more about Greg Chamitoff here on his Wikipedia site and the his flight here on Nasa’s site.
Original article
on Chess com where you can play through his game!  This post entry  was post no 980!

Image rotated specially for LittleIndian…

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It’s been months since I’ve blogged one of my chess games! These games here were on draft for about a month and I’ve thought to get them out here now. I’m not going to say a lot about it, – like previous games – all I want to say is, play through the games, read what I’ve said and hey! the Grandmasters are busy playing and some of them finished the British Champs last week…I was definitely not invited,- not this year, and last year I was way to busy playing chess to go! hehehe..- so what you get here, is really, really a few games of a novice in comparing to those Grandmasters! and a few games of somebody that loooooooves the game and also somebody who plays it for the fun and enjoyment of the game! If you’re not into chess, please go through all the other posts, there’s a lot more than just chess on here! or, move on to the next blog, but I want to tell you one thing! You don’t know what you’re missing if you don’t play chess! It’s not that boring game you think it is! You want me to tell you more…shout!! and I can keep you busy for hours without end. Dig into this site for tons of chess stuff if you’re a chess lover too! and enjoy! Click on the links and the games will open up in a new window. Click on this link to play through a few games where I was a complete loser in most of them… https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/chess-game-20/

Nikita1 vs. Gio82

I played white in this game. I haven’t got much to say, only that I didn’t capture his Knight in move 22, as I wanted to save my Rook, for in case …Bg5-f6…. and I was blocked by his Rook on move 26 and my Queen was driven back again.  In move 36 I forked his King/Queen/Bishop and I think I couldn’t  ask for a better end position. 

Image: ullart.com

 Nikita1 vs. deroy

White again…In this game I’ve thought at one stage the game was my opponent’s game and for some reason I missed the opportunity twice to capture his Knight!  I think I wasn’t really focused in this game as I sometimes play my games just for the fun of chess! I finally turned this game into a win with my King and Rook. These games are all games where I won, but I’ve blogged a few games before where I was really the bad loser! So, please don’t think it’s all win, moonshine and roses for me!

oakey vs. Nikita1

Not much about this game where I played black… I enjoyed it and like some other games…my mind was set on something else and then, out of the blue, I realised (duh! hello!!) that I only have that one move! I don’t think my opponent realised that too…play through it and see what a sudden checkmate that was!

Nikita1 vs. hotmailchessman

Nothing exciting about this game where I played white, except that I looooooove this game from move 30 onwards. Play through it and see how I used my Bishop/Queen whilst my own Rook was in danger too and with my Knights in place, I’ve thought it was really a good end. I invaded him from all sides here…lol

Nikita1 vs. torridon1

In this game I played white  –  a game against one of my favourite chess friends on Chess World. I often play him more for the fun and chat and thought to blog one of our games where he got into too much chat! That’s the problem on the chess site, I often chat too much and lose out on my games! hehehe… who cares! I would like “torridon” to know that I blog this game to “celebrate” our chess friendship on the site. He’s really a pleasure to play and makes me laugh about things in life.

Finally, two games I finished recently against the Earl… his rating is about double mine! and he refuses to play rated games, we always play friendlies only, as he knows one thing, and that’s with all the chatting, he comes only second! These two games are two brilliant examples of how he came second…oh, I’m only joking about the rated games! I’ve now discovered how to win a game against him and he knows for sure to be aware of my evil moves! He doesn’t know it yet, but I’m about to challenge him for a rated game! hehehe…I just wonder if he would accept it! Earl….? are you ready!?

Earl of Norfolk vs. Nikita1

Nikita1 vs. Earl of Norfolk

Nikita1 vs. k.o.bold

I recently finished this game in a tourney and it’s the first tourney in ages which I won…I quite like the way I used my Knights. I will sacrifice a Bishop in order to keep my Knights! In this game I also saw the gap for my Rook to capture either a pawn or his Bishop…and if it’s the pawn first…his Bishop was going to be next as with the pawn-capture his King would be in check! I think that made him resigning the game.

One of those times in chess that you think..duh! hello! you can checkmate your opponent! and you feel like a real beginner, knowing very little! Can that be identified/classified as a type of syndrome…hehehe…

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Image: http://gsport.co.za

I think this is brilliant! Just think how the children can keep themself busy playing chess during breaks! and you will get more children interested in the game! As you can see from these images, these stands can be placed anywhere! I think these people deserve a 10/10 for this idea. See more info on this site: http://www.ramlodi.co.za/

There is little doubt that a development plan that benefits all the parties involved, is a development plan that is bound to succeed, and Mind Sports SA believes its development plan backed by Ramlodi Outdoor Advertising can put together an exciting and dynamic programme, where everyone wins.

Mind Sports South Africa (MSSA) is an affiliate of the South African Confederation of Sport and Olympic Committee, and is responsible for the good governance and promotion of Historical figure games (also known as wargames), Board games (such as Diplomacy, Checkers, Draughts, Morabaraba, etc), and Computer games (whether they are played on ‘cell phones, Sony® PSP’s, personal computers or similar).

The programme is based on open-air game stands at schools, which receive a monthly payment while the game stand is sponsored, and MSSA is focussed on ensuring that the games played in an ever increasing number of schools.

The Morabaraba game stand, which has been used to develop strong mathematical skills. The programme’s official rollout has been aided by the Tshwane University of Technology, which has sponsored a number of game stands being distributed to schools, beginning at Pretoria West High, where a delighted Headmistress Rita Coetzee took delivery of the first two stands.
As soon as the stands were positioned in the quad, learners descended en masse to the game stands and began to play. Only when the bell rang signifying the end of break did the learners leave the stands.

Steven Kekana of Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) was also delighted with the response of the learners to the game stands, as the game of Morabaraba is well known to have a strong linear mathematical background, and has previously been used by Tshwane University of Technology to identify learners who have strong mathematical skills.

Additional stands will be set up at schools in Benoni, Johannesburg, Witbank, Nelspruit, Attridgeville, and Mamelodi within the month.

Source: http://gsport.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1681&Itemid=52

Images: ramlodi.co.za…IM Watu Kobese…The “Lion” of South Africa (right)

http://rpc.technorati.com/rpc/ping

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Watu Kobese IM (South Africa)..Image: farm1.static.flickr.com

This is a news article about Watu playing chess on the 29th June in Pretoria in a simul to raise money for the Ramlodi chess festival in July. A Grade 7-student (u/14) checkmated him in a game! Rian Cox is also a Springbok Chess player.
Read more about the RAMLODI Chess Festival here and you can visit the Official site here
On THIS LINK you can play through his games on Chessgames.


On THIS LINK you can read about the Chess simultaneous on the Kolonnade Centre’s site.

Skaakkampioen kom toe ’n Ermeloër teë
Jun 29 2008 06:13:41:670PM – (SA)

Mnr. Watu Kobese, Suid-Afrika se skaakmeester met die hoogste gradering tans, het Pretorianers – 40 van hulle – eergister by die Kolonnade-inkopiesentrum in Pretoria die stryd aangesê.

’n Oorlogsveld van 40 skaakborde is staangemaak terwyl Kobese opponente begin lok het.

“Ek glo skaak kry nie genoeg erkenning in Suid-Afrika nie. Selfs die onderwysdepartement moet verstaan dat skaak help met jou leerwerk en kognitiewe denke,” het die skaakfoendi gesê.

“ ’n Skaakbord het ’n X- en Y-as wanneer ’n mens byvoorbeeld aan wiskunde dink. Skaak is baie goedkoop en jy het geen spasie nodig daarvoor nie. Skaak is vir my soos musiek en kuns. Dis ’n intellektuele plesier. Dit leer jou ook om jou opponent te respekteer.

“Daar word gemeen dat skaak jou sosiale karakter weerspieël. Ek is ’n baie aggressiewe onkompromistiese speler. ’n Mens moet skaakfiks wees. Sodra jy slaplê, verlaag jou sin vir gevaar. ’n Rede vir my sukses is die vermoë om vinnig variasies te bereken op die skaakbord.

Soos ek aanstap van een opponent na die volgende, hou ek my moeilike opponente in gedagte en werk solank aan daardie skuiwe in my kop. Ek vrees Russiese spelers die meeste. Hulle leer skaak van vroeg af op skool.”

Terwyl die tuisopponente peinsend die skaakbord voor hulle bestudeer, stap Kobese al skuiwende van een spel na die volgende. “Skaak laat jou verder dink,” vertel Werner Buys (10) van Rayton. “Skaak is werklik fun en dit gee ’n mens kans om jou tyd ordentlik te bestee.”

En toe kom die groot gif in die klein botteltjie. Uit die 47 skaakspele wat Kobese gespeel het, was een spel ’n probleem.

’n Gr. 7-leerling van Ermelo en ’n o.14 junior skaak-Springbok, Rian Cox, vertel: “Ek het my ruiter vir twee van Watu se pionne opgeoffer, dit alles om Watu se koning oop te kry. En in die 21ste skuif was dit skaakmat.”


Hannah Kneen–8jr — van Johannesburg hou die volgende skuif van mnr. Watu Kobese, ‘n skaakmeester, dop. ‘n Geldinsameling is die naweek by die Kolonnade-inkopiesentrum in Pretoria gehou vir die Ramlodi-skaakfees wat op 18 Julie in Pretoria begin. Foto: Leon Botha

Source: http://www.news24.com/Beeld/Suid-Afrika/0,,3-975_2349020,00.html
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Aerosvit 2008 International Chess Tournament

Magnus Carlsen winner with a total of 8 and Ivanchuk in 2nd place with a total of 7 games.

 Image: http://ukrchess.org.ua/aerosvit2008/foto_e.htm

 

 

The final standings:                       
Carlsen 2765  *   1 ½   1 ½   ½   1 ½   ½   1 1 ½   8
Ivanchuk 2740  0 ½  1 ½  ½  1 1 ½  ½  1 ½  7
 3  Karjakin 2732  ½  ½  ½  0 1 ½  ½  ½  1 ½  ½  6
Eljanov 2687  0 0 ½  1 ½  1 ½  ½  ½  ½  1 6
Volokitin 2684  ½  ½  1 0 0 ½  1 ½  ½  0 1 5½ 
Jakovenko 2711  ½  ½  0 ½  1 0 ½  ½  ½  1 ½  5½ 
Shirov 2740  0 0 ½  0 ½  1 ½  1 0 1 1 5½ 
Alekseev 2711  ½  0 ½  ½  0 ½  ½  1 1 0 ½  5
Svidler 2746  ½  ½  ½  ½  ½  ½  0 0 ½  ½  1 5
10  Nisipeanu 2684  0 ½  0 ½  ½  ½  1 0 ½  1 ½  5
11  Van Wely 2677  0 0 ½  ½  1 0 0 1 ½  0 ½  4
12  Onischuk 2664  ½  ½  ½  0 0 ½  0 ½  0 ½  ½  3½ 
                               

Standings after round 7…source: Chessgames


Please click Chessgames here to follow the results of games and to play through games played on any particular day!

If you click on the link of CHESSCLUB you can watch the “game of the day” on a movie!

Round 11 : Final round…results

Svidler, Peter ½ – ½ Van Wely, Loek
Ivanchuk, Vassily 1-0 Eljanov, Pavel
Karjakin, Sergey ½ – ½ Carlsen, Magnus
Volokitin, Andrei 1 – 0 Alekseev, Evgeny
Jakovenko, Dmitry ½ – ½ Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter
Onischuk, Alexander 0 – 1 Shirov, Alexei

Carlsen still leading!

Round 10 : Results

Van Wely, Loek 0 – 1 Ivanchuk, Vassily
Eljanov, Pavel ½ – ½ Karjakin, Sergey
Carlsen, Magnus ½ – ½  Volokitin, Andrei
Alekseev, Evgeny ½ – ½ Jakovenko, Dmitry
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter ½ – ½ Onischuk, Alexander
Shirov, Alexei 1 – 0 Svidler, Peter

Round 9 results:

Karjakin, Sergey ½ – ½ Van Wely, Loek
Volokitin, Andrei 0 – 1 Eljanov, Pavel
Jakovenko, Dmitry ½ – ½ Carlsen, Magnus
Onischuk, Alexander ½ – ½ Alekseev, Evgeny
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter 1 – 0 Shirov, Alexei
Ivanchuk, Vassily ½ – ½ Svidler, Peter

Results: Round 8

Van Wely, Loek 1 – 0 Volokitin, Andrei
Eljanov, Pavel ½ – ½ Jakovenko, Dmitry
Carlsen, Magnus ½ – ½ Onischuk, Alexander
Alekseev, Evgeny 1 – 0 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter
Svidler, Peter ½ – ½ Karjakin, Sergey
Shirov, Alexei 0 – 1 Ivan
chuk, Vassily

Round 7  results:

Jakovenko, Dmitry 1 – 0 Van Wely, Loek
Onischuk, Alexander 0 – 1 Eljanov, Pavel
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter 0 – 1 Carlsen, Magnus
Alekseev, Evgeny ½ – ½ Shirov, Alexei
Volokitin, Andrei ½ – ½ Svidler, Peter
Karjakin, Sergey ½ – ½ Ivanchuk, Vassily


Please click HERE to play through games of round 7.

Magical Magnus conjures win over Shirov

Round 5 at Foros and yet another elite Grandmaster crumbles in the face of Magnus Carlsen’s relentless pressure.  Alexei Shirov is a formidable player and has himself come close to the World Championship crown, but today he became Carlsen’s latest victim.

Shirov answered 1.d4 with the Slav defence and Magnus chose the popular ‘Moscow’ variation in reply.  A balanced opening developed into an even middlegame, but as in previous games, Magnus kept creating tricky problems for his opponent to solve and soon Shirov fell into time trouble as he sought to find the best answers.

It was on the 61st move that Shirov finally cracked, allowing Magnus to catch his King in a mating net.

Elsewhere on another exciting day, the closest challenger to Magnus failed to keep up the pace as Sergey Karjakin lost with the Black pieces against Andrei Volokitin.   The other decisive games saw Nisipeanu put Van Wely to the sword in a Najdorf Sicilian and Svidler employed his favourite Grunfeld defence to good effect against Onischuk.

Vassily Ivanchuk fought hard against Dmitry Jakovenko, but an extra pawn in a Knight ending was not enough and the game ended all-square after 72 moves.

Magnus Carlsen now leads by a clear 1.5 points with a very impressive score of 4.5/5.  If the world rankings were published today then Carlsen would be ranked second in the world, with only World Champion Vishy Anand ahead of him.
Please click
HERE to play through the games of round 5…played on the 12th June.

 Source of article….about round 5: http://www.chess.com

Round 6  results!

Van Wely, Loek ½ – ½ Onischuk, Alexander
Eljanov, Pavel ½ – ½ Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter
Carlsen, Magnus ½ – ½ Alekseev, Evgeny
Svidler, Peter ½ – ½ Jakovenko, Dmitry
Ivanchuk, Vassily ½ – ½ Volokitin, Andrei
Shirov, Alexei ½ – ½ Karjakin, Sergey

Ukrainian Chess Federation
International Chess Tournament from 7-20 June 2008
Please click

HERE
to play through the games of round 1 and on THIS LINK you can see the results of rounds 2 and 3.
On THIS LINK you can play through games played in round 2.

Results Round 3

Carlsen, Magnus 1 – 0 Van Wely, Loek
Eljanov, Pavel 1 – 0 Shirov, Alexei
Alekseev, Evgeny 1 – 0 Svidler, Peter
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter ½ – ½ Ivanchuk, Vassily
Onischuk, Alexander ½ – ½ Karjakin, Sergey
Jakovenko, Dmitry 1 – 0 Volokitin, Andrei

Standings …Round 4

Van Wely, Loek vs Alekseev, Evgeny
Eljanov, Pavel vs Carlsen, Magnus
Svidler, Peter vs Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter
Ivanchuk, Vassily vs Onischuk, Alexander
Karjakin, Sergey vs Jakovenko, Dmitry
Shirov, Alexei vs Volokitin, Andrei

 

Day of Rest…Balaklava…

~Day of Rest…Balaklava…Images: Official site of Aerosvit

Magnus Carlsen, Norway, 2765

Peter Svidler, Russia, 2746

Vasiliy Ivanchuk, Ukraine, 2740

Alexei Shirov, Spain, 2740

Sergey Karjakin, Ukraine, 2732

Dmitry Jakovenko, Russia, 2711

Evgeny Alekseev, Russia, 2711

Pavel Eljanov, Ukraine, 2687
See 4 more players’ photos HERE with more information on all players.The list of participants:

1. Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2765

2. Svidler, Peter RUS 2746

3. Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR 2740

4. Shirov, Alexei ESP 2740

5. Karjakin, Sergey UKR 2732

6. Jakovenko, Dmitry RUS 2711

7. Alekseev, Evgeny RUS 2711

8. Eljanov, Pavel UKR 2687

9. Volokitin, Andrei UKR 2684

10. Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter ROU 2684

11. Van Wely, Loek NED 2676

12. Onischuk, Alexander USA 2664

June 8th, 2008, Round 1, Time 15:00…ALL rounds start at 15:00 —every day!
June 9th, Round 2
June 10th, Round 3
June 11th, Round 4
June 12th, Round 5
June 13th, Round 6
June 14th, REST DAY
June 15th, Round 7
June 16th, Round 8
June 17th, Round 9
June 18th, Round 10
June 19th, Round 11

Round 2 Magnus Carlsen

 


Church on the Rock…Foros…

Foros, Crimea is the settlement in the Ukraine where this tournament is taking place…

 

The region is also known as the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and lies on the northern coast of the Black Sea. The population is two million inhabitants, the capital is the city of Simferopol.

Foros, where the AeroSvit tournament is held, is a small village situated about 40 km from Yalta, in the southern part of Crimea. The climate conditions are gorgeous. Foros is the place were the dacha (summer-house) of the President of Ukraine is situated. The Russian writer Maxim Gorkiy lived and worked for some time in Foros. Today Ukrainian politicians and businessmen own summer houses there. Students spend their summers in Foros. There is the orthodox Foros Church and a beautiful national park. What is also good in Foros – you spell the name of the village exactly the way you pronounce it – F-o-r-o-s.

Source: chessbase

Last 2 Images: chessbase

In Foros, you will get this monument about Yuri Gagarin, the first man in Space!
Click HERE to read more about him.

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Chess champ takes on 20 opponents at Hay
May 25 2008 Media Wales

Former chess grandmaster Boris Spassky will today take on 20 opponents simultaneously – including one in Antarctica.

Spassky will take up the challenge at the Hay Festival, in mid Wales.

And, with Antarctica 8,000 miles away, it will be the longest distance live chess match ever attempted.

Spassky’s on-line opponent on the continent will be Ian McNab, a field technician with the British Antarctic Survey based on the Rothera Research Station.

His other 19 opponents, who include comedian Dom Joly, Liberal Democrat Welsh Assembly Member Peter Black, and a number of the area’s leading child chess prodigies, will play him in person.

Mr MacNab, 52, from Manchester, said: “I am not very optimistic. I would describe myself as an amateur, but I was quite good as a teenager. I don’t think that Boris has much to be afraid of.”

The former outdoor pursuits instructor is part of a British team of 21 scientists and experts who are undertaking a long-term monitoring of environmental and maritime changes in the region.

Their next physical contact with the outside world will not take place until the arrival of a supply ship in October 2008.

Spassky, a 71-year-old Russian, became grandmaster at the age of 18 and proceeded to win the Soviet Chess Championship twice.

He was in the world’s top ten players for most of the years between the mid 50s and the mid 80s.

The simultaneous chess match will take place at 6pm at Richard Booth’s Bookshop, in Lion Street, Hay-On-Wye.

The challenge pre-emts the former world number one’s talk at the annual literary festival tomorrow about his famous loss to Bobby Fischer, in Reykjavik, at the height of the Cold War in 1972.
Source of article : HERE
 We visited Wales a few years ago and I wanted to travel back through this “town of books”…Hay-on-Wye…and on THIS LINK

you can read what I said about the town…I’ve added two pictures here from that link…and on THIS LINK you can see my pics about Aberystwyth, in Wales where we visited friends.
    
You can clearly see the slot to leave your money at the “Honesty Bookshop” in Hay-on-Wye.

 Hay Castle  is where the “Honesty Bookshop” is…where you pay 50p per book and you can see the slot on my first pic for the money!


…and this is the bookshop! image:travel.nytimes.com
http://rpc.technorati.com/rpc/ping

 Please click HERE to visit the website of “Hay-On-Wey”…the “town of books”…

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alexandra2

alexandra-kosteniuk

Click on the images for a larger view.

alexandra-kosteniuk1

alexandrakosteniuk

alexandra-kosteniuk

alexandra-kosteniuk3

alexandra-k

Please click HERE to play through chess games of Alexandra. The link will open in a new window.

10 January 2009: News article about Alexandra…the link will open in a new window.

http://www.miamiherald.com/277/story/847451.html

On this link on my blog, http://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/09/12/alexandra-kosteniuk-winner-of-nalchik/ you can follow the games played in the  World Women’s Chess Championships in  between Kosteniuk and Yifan. There’s also more pictures of her to see.

Alexandra Kosteniuk is one of the beauties in the world of Chess! In this video you can see the game she played against GM Zoltan Almasi. It’s a blitz. Fast chess, also known as, blitz chess, lightning chess, bullet chess and rapid chess, is a type of chess game in which each side is given less time to make their moves than under the normal tournament time controls of 60-150 minutes (1-2½ hours) per player.
Read HERE more about blitz chess.

Please click HERE for the official site of Alexandra Kosteniuk.

Alexandra Kosteniuk comments in detail her blitz game played in Moscow at the World Blitz Championships Qualifiers against one of the world’s top experts on the Berlin Wall defence.
 

Image…NYtimes

The model Carmen Kass in a five-minute blitz match against Viswanathan Anand in 2004.

Image:chessbase


Read the review of this book here at the link at the bottom of this post….or click on the image to order the book.

Many of us, even those of us who don’t play either well or often, are familiar with chess. Some of us will be aware that some pieces are differently represented in different parts of the world, but I wonder how many of us are aware of the comparatively recent introduction of the queen?

Marilyn Yalom attempts three objectives in this interesting book. Firstly, and of most interest to me, she outlines a history of the game of chess and its likely spread across the world. Secondly, Dr Yalom explains the development of the piece currently known as the queen in most European chess play both in terms of its replacement of earlier pieces, and its emerging power. Finally, Dr Yalom makes a case for parallels between the emergence of the power of the chess queen and the rise of powerful female sovereigns in Europe.

While I am attracted to the notion of the role of the chess queen as a reflection of the rise of strong queens (such as Isabella of Castile), and a possible association with the cult of the Virgin Mary, this is of peripheral interest to me. What I did find fascinating was the history of the development of the game, especially the differences between cultures and countries. Dr Yalom advises that the chess queen did not appear on the board until about 1000: some 200 years after the game had been introduced to southern Europe. Yet, by 1497, the queen had developed from a weak piece (moving one square at a time on the diagonal) to the more formidable force that she is today.

Dr Yalom presents a wealth of information in this book. Whether you share her conclusions, her enthusiasm for the subject combined with her capacity to present a variety of interesting data in a readable and accessible way will make this an enjoyable read.

Those who are serious chess players may find some of the facts interesting. Those of us interested in the evolution of institutions of power and who choose to explore parallels between games of strategy and political realities should also enjoy this book.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060090650/ref=cm_rdp_product

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Magnus Carlsen  against Alexander Grischuk

Gata Kamsky against Ivan Cheparinov


Peter Svidler against Yue Wang


Gashimov against Navara

Inarkiev against Bacrot

Chess players in Baku, Azerbaijan are now busy playing round 11, follow their games live on the “live” link on my blog. By looking at the images of the players, they all look very serious! On the game-images you can see what the chess boards looked like up to the particular move that can also be seen on the image. Please click on the games-images for a larger view. All other images are from the Official site.

Results of finished games…

Karjakin 1/2 Radjabov1/2

Adams 1/2 Mamedjarov 1/2

Grischuk 1/2 Carlsen 1/2

Cheparinov 1/2 Kamsky 1/2

Inarkiev 1 Bacrot 0

Yue Wang 1 Peter Svidler 0

Vugar Gashimov 1/2 David Navara 1/2

 

On these images you can see players on their way and getting examined by security…seems like Svidler was in a good, relaxing mood  and even smiled friendly at the camera!…..



 

 

This photo has nothing to do with Baku Chess…a photo I want to share…Svidler and Anand… I think Svidler might be my “next” favourite player – I have a few and can’t make up my mind though, but I do enjoy his friendly personality that reflects from many photos. On this photo he’s sharing a “joke” with Anand…wonder if he was trying to advise Anand on how to be the best…if you look at his finger…lol!

Pairings for rounds 12 and 13:

Round 12 on 04/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Kamsky Gata – Svidler Peter    
Inarkiev Ernesto – Yue Wang    
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar – Bacrot Etienne  
Carlsen Magnus – Adams Michael  
Gashimov Vugar – Grischuk Alexander  
Radjabov Teimour – Navara David  
Cheparinov Ivan – Karjakin Sergey  
         
Round 13 on 05/05/08 at 14:00  
         
Karjakin Sergey – Kamsky Gata    
Navara David – Cheparinov Ivan  
Grischuk Alexander – Radjabov Teimour  
Adams Michael – Gashimov Vugar  
Bacrot Etienne – Carlsen Magnus  
Yue Wang – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar  
Svidler Peter – Inarkiev Ernesto   

After round 11:

1 Wang Yue 2689 CHN 7
2 Grischuk Alexander 2716 RUS 7
3 Gashimov Vugar 2679 AZE 6½
4 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2752 AZE 6
5 Carlsen Magnus 2765 NOR 6
6 Adams Michael 2729 ENG 6
7 Radjabov Teimour 2751 AZE 5½
8 Kamsky Gata 2726 USA 5½
9 Bacrot Etienne 2705 FRA 5
10 Cheparinov Ivan 2695 BUL 5
11 Karjakin Sergey 2732 UKR 5
12 Svidler Peter 2746 RUS 4½
13 Inarkiev Ernesto 2684 RUS 4½
14 Navara David 2672 CZE 3½

Enjoy this video-report about round 11 from the Official Fide-Baku site

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In Baku, Azerbaijan, it was a rainy day today….In this image you can see Radjabov sharing his umbrella. In Round 10, Carlsen and Navara drew their game and Grischuck and Mamedyarov.  Ivan Cheparinov-(Bulgaria)  won his game against Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan).
Follow THIS LINK to watch some press conferences about different players.
Other results:
Gata Kamsky 1/2 Wang Yue 1/2
Gashimov Vugar 1/2 Karjakin Sergey 1/2
Inarkiev Ernesto 1/2 Michael Adams 1/2
Svidler Peter 1/2 Bacrot Etienne 1/2

Follow the “live” link on the side bar of my blog to follow the games live.
Please follow
THIS LINK to see more photos taken today in round 10.

…..is that an expression of a blunder?

 

Round 11 on 03/05/08 at 15:00  
         
Cheparinov Ivan – Kamsky Gata  
Karjakin Sergey – Radjabov Teimour  
Navara David – Gashimov Vugar  
Grischuk Alexander – Carlsen Magnus  
Adams Michael – Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Bacrot Etienne – Inarkiev Ernesto  
Yue Wang – Svidler Peter  

This video is from the Official website of Fide-Baku-2008


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In this game I’ve thought that I had really a cool game! Very early in this game I was in really big trouble…if you look at black’s position after move 13. I made a desperate attack on his King, to prevent a checkmate! and by my Bishop-move…in move 14, I could relief my King from that pressure, but now my King was exposed! but at least not in checkmate…Knowing wat was coming..I moved my King with move 21 to F1. In move 38…my lovely Knight-to-the rescue…and I count myself lucky with move 42…to capture his Knight. From move 51 and on… I could have done better, but at least I had some Pawns left and pushed through with one Pawn. With black’s move in move 58, I sacrificed one Rook in order to prevent his Pawn from promotion as I knew that I was still safe with my Pawns left…with black’s move in 62….was just what I wanted! and I could finish the game in a very slow Rook/King @ lonely King… this opponent is rated much higher than I am and that’s why I’ve thought that was really cool play on my side….to recover from a early heart attack, my poor King… he’s now back from intensive care and all is well with him! hehehe…click on this link to play through the game…it will open in a new window.
Earl from the chess site sent me this quote when I commented on this game: Nimzovitch once said, regarding one of his games, “[My opponent] now succumbs to a very pretty attack (I would say this even if the game were played by my worst enemy, so why not when it’s me?).”
This is also a game played on Chess World…and I think you’ve noticed that I played white again in this game…

Nikita1 vs. sirlancelot08

The Rooks/Queens game!

This next game was really a very tough game..and one of my longest games on the site…my longest game was 107 moves and you can view the game HERE on my blogger site…not only was it a long game, but also a game we started in July 2007! My opponent was a slow mover, but was also on holiday a few times. If you look at the image, you will see why I call it the Rooks/Queens’ game… I don’t want to elaborate on the game as you will see how tense this game was near to the end before my opponent resigned when you play through the game. Please click on the link and it will open in a new window. In this game my opponent’s rating was also about 300+ higher than mine. I played white in this game.

Nikita1 vs. jammywel

 

 

READ ALL ABOUT IT!! ….on my blog…

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Chess Love
This is again one of my own games played on Chess World… I blog this game due to a couple of reasons. Firstly…to show you how easy you can get a piece trapped…-I played white in this game-…..my Rook with black’s move after move 16 …trapped!  If… he had moved his Bishop to G7… I was Rook-less! Secondly… to show you how one can recover from a few thoughtless moves….really bad moves on my side…and how I gained control again. I captured his Knight… move 17 …..so by the way…if it’s your first time here…then you don’t know it… but I always capture a Knight if I can and I do prefer to keep mine in safety where possible… hey… horses are great animals and they do work for you…even if it’s on a chess board! lol! you should allow them to work for you…I really started panicking and was desperate with move 20 and with black’s Knight-move…ahw…what can I say! For some reason, black missed E5 with move 21 and from there…he missed my Rook too! and preferred to check instead…Move 23…brilliant move by black as I lost a pawn and my poor Knightie! Another desperate move on my side with move 26 and I sacrificed my Rook in order to capture black’s Rook, because I had other plans in my head…. With move 29-30… I saw the checkmate earlier….and was hoping for the right moment…the game was really getting tense and I couldn’t wait to make that devastating move…and with black’s move (32)Qf6… I knew he missed the checkmate and could I perform that last move to close the game. I used to have my Knights most of the time in my end games or in a checkmate…but in this game…very rare for me…I have one of my Bishops to-the-rescue. If you click on the link, the game will open in a new window.

Nikita1 vs. Perry Mason

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Click on the images to see a larger view. These are results from round 4, the Chess Grand Prix tournament in Baku, Azerbaijan. If you click HERE you will find a games-link and you can play through the games played in the previous rounds…on the side bar of my blog, you will find a link to the current round’s games.

All images from the Official Fide-Baku-Chess-site.

 

Pairings for round 5

 

Baku…city…wall

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europeanchess

Round 7…results…please click HERE to play through the games in round 7…in the women’s section and click HERE to play through the games of the men.

Round 5 results…Please click HERE to play through the games interactively.
 

The European Individual Chess Championship is now taking place in Bulgaria…men/women are battling for the top positions. On THIS LINK you can view their games live. Round 4 will be played today.

Please click HERE for results and standings where you can view more photos of the participants too.

Tsveta Galunova

GM Miroshnichenko – GM Markos

Image: chessbase

Source: eicc2008.com Bulletin: 4 PDF

Click on the images for a larger view

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Azerbaijan is now a world of chess! GrandMasters in the world of Chess are there for this prestigious event taking place in Baku. Round 4 results now available too. On my side bar you can follow the games LIVE. Look for the “Fide Grand Prix”-link! Read HERE more about Azerbaijan.

Please click HERE to play through the games of Gashimov vs. Svidler, Carlsen vs. Inarkiev and Navara vs. Grischuk in round 3 played on the 23rd April.
Click HERE for the results of round 4.

 

 

On this table you can see the results after round 3. The video can also be seen on
Baku’s Official website
and it’s about round 2! See more photos on this link too.

 

 

 

Peter Svidler: Image – Chessvibes

Michael Adams…Image: Chessvibes

 

Kamsky…examined by security before entering …Image: Chessvibes

Carlsen…and security…see more images on Chessvibes.com


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Image: chess.com…Yelena Dembo
Click on THIS LINK to play through a game of her played in this tournament in round 8 on the 29th April 2008.
The 2008 European Individual Chess Championships are starting on the 21st April in
Plovdiv,
Bulgaria. There are separate men’s and women’s titles at stake in 11-round Swiss events.
Click HERE to play through the games interactively.

 

 

 

Participating in the women’s event is Yelena Dembo from the Chess.com site…
You can view her games HERE on Chess.com.
You can follow the games and results HERE

 

 

 

 

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The first move is officially made at the board of Magnus Carlsen (White) against Wang Yue (Black). Standing from left to right: Geoffrey Borg (CEO Global Chess), Elisabeta Polihroniade (Deputy Chief Arbiter), Azad Rahimov (Minister for Youth and Sport, Azerbaijan), Elman Rustamov (Chairman, President of Azerbaijan Chess Federation), Zurab Azmaiparashvili (Technical Adviser).

Baku 2008 has started, and with it the first FIDE Grand Prix Series.

Please click HERE for the Official website in Baku. There are videos to see and games in PGN Files.

Standings in the first 7 positions so far:

Kamsky, Radjabov, Adams, Grischuk, Karjakin, Navara, Carlsen

 On THIS LINK link you can see results and pairings.

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I hope you all have a good weekend!! I’m that chicken in the image! …..and here’s a very short chess game, chess game 27…. to play through. I think in this game there are also only 27 moves!.. I played black in this game. The reason why I blog this game…you will see early on how easy it is to get your rook captured! I don’t like to use my Queen early in a chess game. I believe to develop the back pieces slowly before moving my Queen…you can also see how fast I had to get her back in safety, as she was threatened a few times…she was even trapped in that corner and I even sacrificed other pieces to save her at one point! and once again..like I said before…my dearest Knight… made my opponent resigning this game. My opponent has beaten me up in two other games! So, I really think this was just my luck! Some people can’t have it all! hehehe…Click on the link and the game will open in a new window.

juliethered vs. Nikita1

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This is chess game 26!  In this game I played black. This was really a tough game….one of those challenging games. If you play through the game you will see why. Luckily…as always… I had a Knight-to-the-rescue. I will even sacrifice a Rook just to have my Knight! Exactly like in real life… that’s why Knights are there! hehehe… look at move 80! Fork! and from there one…it was really easy. If you play through the game, you will see why my opponent named this game after this nursery rhyme! See if you can work out why I couldn’t really move away from that advanced Pawn of my opponent…He resigned this game at the end. Enjoy playing through it by clicking on the link.

arturo1113 vs. Nikita1


Ring a-ring o’ roses,
A pocketful of posies.
a-tishoo!, a-tishoo!.
We all fall down.

This nursery rhyme is about the black death…also called “The Plague”. The symptoms of the plague included a raised red rash on the skin (Ring a ring o’ rosies) and violent sneezing (Atishoo, Atishoo) A pouch of sweet smelling herbs or posies were carried due to the belief that the disease was transmitted by bad smells. The death rate was over 60% and the plage was only halted by the
 Great Fire of London in September 1666
which killed the rats which carried the disease which had been transmitting it to water sources. Read about Samuel Pepys and his connection with the Fire of London. Read on this link about the black death which was also called “The Plague”  and  on THIS LINK to read more about Ring-a-ring-a-rosie.
 

Artist: Louise Mansfield : Irishpaintings.com

famousquotes.me.uk

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I blogged in December HERE about chess boxing and you can see a video too on this link! Now it’s also in the UK! I’m glad I don’t have to box before I can play a game of chess! Wonder if they play some good chess games in this sport…or is it just for the fun…and because of the rules…that they make only a few moves to keep the organisers happy….hehehe…wonder if they have chess coaches…chess is about tactics…concentration…seems to me the skills these people need too…hehe… yeah yeah chess!! once again!

Opponents compete over the chessboard then hit each other in the boxing ring in a combination sport being introduced to north London.

Chessboxing features alternate rounds of chess and boxing, with the winner decided by either knockout, checkmate or a judge’s decision after 11 rounds.

The first UK chessboxing club has begun at Islington Boxing Club in Archway.

Founder Tim Woolgar said: “Boxing requires tactical thinking, a skill that is vital to playing chess.”

We train at a high level to ensure competitors learn how to fully defend themselves

Chessboxing originates from Berlin, where the world’s first tournament was held last November. Championships have also taken place in Amsterdam and Cologne.

“I’m interested in both chess and boxing, so I went to one of the Berlin championships and thought they combined the two perfectly,” said Mr Woolgar.

“Boxers need real strength of mind, which helps them compete in chess.”

Competitors are given 60 seconds to remove their gloves as they leave the ring to sit or stand at the chessboard.
Read the entire article HERE on the BBC’s site.

Image: National Geographic

 

To win, players must either checkmate or knock out their opponent within 11 rounds. 
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On  ChessWorld, in the chess forum, we had a discussion about male/female players.  The question was… are meneuwe
better at chess….? and some wondered why men are/were better…  Some people think chess is a male game. I didn’t play chess when I was at school, although I could play, as there were always only boys playing…as I said before on my blog… I felt intimidated by those boys giving me the look of…”hey… you’re a girl…and you play chess!”… as if it’s actually a boy’s game…I think nowadays boys/men have accepted  that chess is also a girls/female game and that we can actually also play the game, and sometimes even a bit better…also, I think it’s just a matter of statistics. For some men on the site, it’s even hard to lose a game to a woman! I experience it every now and then and quite recently had again such an experience of a male player that couldn’t handle the fact that a female was beating him.

We have also two tournaments going…where there are equally male/female players in both… I’m in the one tournament…and in this tournament the outcome looks positive for both sexes…in the other tourney it seems to be the females that will walk away as the winners…How do you feel? Are men better…is it a male game…what’s your opinion? 

On THIS LINK you can follow the discussion about male/female chess on CW. This forum link will open in a new window.

 In the following chess game, I played white. My opponent – this game was played more than six months ago, before this entry – was about 400+ ahead of me although he’s actually a 2000+ player, which means he would then be 800 ahead of me.  He resigned at the end. You can click on the link and it will open in a new window to play through the game. I think it was also a bit of luck on my side. He wasn’t really impressed with the fact that I was beating him. Then, best of all, the game got more attention in the chess forum as an annotated game with a title: “Underdog wins”…Here is the game link ….Nikita1 vs. No6

chessart roger morin

This chess art is a brilliant piece of art by Roger Morin

I came across a site with very useful information… a very extensive site where you can read more about the research/study that was done about the female/male chess player! Read here an extract and you can follow the link to read the entire article! There is more to read than just this extract… you will not regret reading more!

After examining the data the researchers made four statements summarized below:

They found that men and women differed in chess ability in all age groups even after differences like frequency of play (read: level of training) or age were taken into account. The disparity between men and women in ability exists at the beginning and persists across all age groups. At least ostensibly this would lend credence to the ability distribution hypothesis in the sense that it suggests the mean ability between men and women are innately different. The last piece of data looks at whether that is true.

They found no greater variance in men than women. It had been suggested that since science selects for individuals at the upper tail of the distribution, a higher variance in men than women might explain their greater representation. However, the researchers found that — with respect to chess — if anything