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Fly, thought, on wings of gold,
go settle upon the slopes and the hills
where the sweet airs of our
native soil smell soft and mild!
Greet the banks of the river Jordan
and Zion’s tumbled towers.
Oh, my country, so lovely and lost!
Oh remembrance so dear yet unhappy!

Golden harp of the prophetic wise men,
why hang so silently from the willows?
Rekindle the memories in our hearts,
tell us about the times gone by!
Remembering the fate of Jerusalem
play us a sad lament
or else be inspired by the Lord
to fortify us to endure our suffering!

I think the chorus of the Hebrew slave from the Italian opera, Nabucco, is many people’s favourite. These words are beautiful and leaves me in a sad mood if I think about South Africa and how it’s getting destroyed by Zuma.

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Chess pieces from elephant tusk carved in China – Nottingham Castle Museum

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James Bond – and chess.

Chess and F1

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Twitter chess: This week: #RedSeason #F1 #RussianGP #KLSochi

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Read about Watu Kobese, a South African chess champion and Fide trainer and now also author of chess books. Kobese is taking the game and his book on a roadshow to promote chess. Click on the image for a larger view in order to read the complete article.

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chessstLouis2015

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Nakamura seems lost: a quick Bf2 will be hard to deal with, his King on g5 is too weak.

Source: Please click here to read the article on the site of ‘Business Insider.’

The Sinquefield Cup Chess Tournament is on at the moment in St Louis and I’ve been following some of the games and thought it was high time to blog about a ‘big’ tournament again. The images above are from twitter The link below is game 7 where Anand is playing against Wesley So. You can see the moves up to move 11 by Anand.
Please click HERE to follow the game live.
1 e4 e5
2 Nf3 Nc6
3 Bb5 Nf6
4 d3 Bc5
5 Bxc6 dxc6
6 Nbd2 O-O
7 O-O Re8
8 Nc4 Nd7
9 b3 a5
10 a4 f6
11 Be3 Bb4
12 Rc1 b5
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Chess Sinquefield Cup round 7 Anand vs Wesley So

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Round 7 – Aronian and Nakamura

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Round 7 – Magnus vs Grischuk

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Round 7 – Caruana vs Vachier Lagrave

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Magnus Carlsen on his way to the playing venue – photo: @   SaintLouisChessClub

The rest of the schedule:

30-Aug Sunday 1:00 PM Round 7 Chess Club
31-Aug Monday 1:00 PM Round 8 Chess Club
1-Sep Tuesday 1:00 PM Round 9 Chess Club
2-Sep Wednesday 12:00 PM Playoff

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This is one of my own poems. It is a cento. A cento is a poem written using other author’s lines or passages. This ‘cento’ though has been written using my own poems. The poems I used are all from my Afrikaans poems. I do write English too, but as I said before, it’s just playing with words. I don’t try to be professional. I decided a few years ago to do my ‘bit’ for Afrikaans on the 14th August every year. Unfortunately, it didn’t happen last year and I couldn’t let another year go by without having one on this day! This is the history behind the 14th August.

The Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners (Afrikaans for “Society of Real Afrikaners”) was formed on 14 August 1875 in the town of Paarl by a group of Afrikaans speakers from the current Western Cape region. From 15 January 1876 the society published a journal in Afrikaans called Die Afrikaanse Patriot (“The Afrikaans Patriot”) as well as a number of books, including grammars, dictionaries, religious material and histories. Die Afrikaanse Patriot was succeeded in 1905 by today’s Paarl newspaper. You can read more about this Society on this link on the site of Wikipedia.

If you are Afrikaans,  I hope you enjoy these couple of lines.

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My siel op haelwit wolke

In gietende reën sypel my gedagtes: eindloos!
Ek stuur vir jou die goud
van sondeurdrenkte landskappe
in die galery van my stille gemoed.
My opgevoude gedagtes steek vas
en onderhou my geheue
wat onvermydelik verstrengel is
en soos gister
vind jy my siel op haelwit wolke;
my gedagtes wentel om die aura van my taal
en rol ragfyn ligstraaltjies voor my uit:
wat die tuimelende bergstilte
laat rol oor die dansende blou waters
na die holtes van my gedagtes.

==Nikita 14/08/2015 


Mantovani is one of my real big favourites. On this video you’ll find a whole library of his music to keep you company. I hope you enjoy!

If you are a regular reader of my blog, you would know that I do play chess myself too. I’ve blogged quite a few chess games in the past. This is one of my most recent chess games on chess.com Time is little to play rated chess games and I was tricked into this game, but managed to escape the worst. Rated games involve more concentration and I tend to play friendlies just for fun and I feel I can ‘escape’ or shut down from normal work and enjoy the game. 

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I like how I managed to checkmate my opponent, though he was very close to checkmate me! I played white in this game – not my favourite colour, as I discovered I play better games when I play black. If you are interested, please click here to play through the game. If you are a chess player yourself, please feel free to leave a comment and Dan, if you read here, you might want to analyse my game…hehe.

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Image: classicfm


A real favourite! I hope you enjoy too. Turn up the volume! Beethoven – Pastoral Symphony – 1st movement. 

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Another classic: Women playing chess – ‘A game of Chess’ 1914 See the original picture on the site of the LoC.

CapeTown_SAOpenChessFestival

The 2015 South African Open Chess Festival incorporates the SA Schools Individual Chess Championship and SA Open Chess Championship
SA Open Chess Championship runs from Fri 03 July to Sat 11 July 2015
(entire day over weekends and evenings during week days)
SA Schools Individual Chess Championship runs from Mon 06 July to Thu 09 July 2015
(mornings and afternoons)
SA Schools Individual Chess Championship players may choose to participate additionally in the SA Open.
For more details, click this link. Click on the image for a larger view.

wwcc2015Fide

WWCC2015
It is the World Women’s Chess Championships 2015 in Sochi. Follow this link to play through the games. The final battle is between Russia and Ukraine – how ironic. All images are from the official site – from the games link.

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Muzychuk vs Pogonina

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Final pairings / results – game 4 will be played on Sunday 5th April 2015 local time: 3pm

Player Fed Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Pogonina, Natalia RUS 2456 ½ 0 ½ 1
Muzychuk, Mariya UKR 2526 ½ 1 ½ 2

Game 4 link
Click here for Game 4.

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The new Women’s World Chess Champion – Mariya Muzychuk

Comedy of Errors

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chessgame22

There stands my castle!
His queen, it was his queen!
Queen of queens, how far dost thou excel?
Come hither, come! Come, come, and take a queen
Sir your queen must overboard!
Will take your queen
Farewell sweet queen!
I was in a mood to blog a chess game, this is one of my very old games – about 8 years ago! I played black and like how I trapped my opponent. I love Shakespeare’s works and these lines are from Shakespeare. This title of the post doesn’t fit the writing, don’t worry, it’s meant not to fit. I need to play more chess so my brain can get organised in boxes. I like that guy’s video on youtube about the male and female brain. I need a male brain, so I can organised everything in boxes. I try too many things in one go. Here is the game link.
Please click HERE to play through the game.

Enjoy some chess dance


Love this music – great for a Saturday evening. The Springboks lost against Ireland! And.. Anand vs Carlsen = 1/2

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The World Chess Championship Match between World Champion Magnus Carlsen and Challenger Vishy Anand is taking place in Sochi, Russia on November 7–28, 2014. It’s the first time that Magnus will defend his title. [Images:Twitter & Official site]

5-time World Chess Champion, Vishy Anand is considered one of the most versatile chess players in the world. He is the only world champion who won titles playing in all different formats (match, tournament and knockout). He is the first Indian grandmaster.

It’s been a year since my entry about the game in Chennai, where Magnus walked off as the World Champion

Please click HERE for the official site. You can also follow the game on twitter – on the bottom photo you will find the official twitter account of Carlsen and Anand. Sochi temperatures average 24° C – 27° C between June and October/November. Who are you supporting?

anand_vs_carlsen2014_chess_set
The Chess set
anandcarlsen
I hope you like this card-image – I was in a mood to play around with the two chess kings!
As Carlsen is called the ‘Mozart of Chess’ – I have some Mozart for you to listen to. One of my favourite pieces – though only part of the composition.

anand_vs_carlsen2014
This is the hotel where Anand and Carlsen will be playing.

This is the Instagram link for you to follow, should you wish to do so.
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On the map I’ve highlighted for you where Sochi is.


I always loved this golden oldie. Is there a quick way to get hours of work done in one hour – if you are too lazy and not in the mood for any work? Any suggestions will be gratefully accepted, scientifically tested and those that work will be used in future!

Tromso_2014
Tromso_Chess

Norwegian camera teams may have been swarming around Magnus Carlsen before his meeting with world number two Levon Aronian, but the serious chess spectators had eyes firmly fixed on the start of Kramnik-Topalov, where the feud that began in their acrimonious 2006 world title match has resulted in permanently frosty relations.

by GM Jonathan Tisdall

Some of the games played today round 5. On this link you can follow the live games or play through games already played in previous rounds.

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Tromso round 5: Topalov vs Kramnik
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Round 5: Kramnik vs Topalov 1-0
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Round 5: Ivan Cheparinov vs Peter Svidler 1/2-1/2
Tromso_CarlsenRound 5: Aronian vs Carlsen 1/2-1/2
Tromso_Round5
Round 5: Barileng Gaealafshwe vs Kenny Solomon 0-1
On this youtube.com/watch?v=-xABHJdf31o link you can see Kenny as South Africa’s Chess Grandmaster and it’s strange that Fide still has him as an IM on his profile here: ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=14300192 Melissa Greeff is South Africa’s first Women Chess Grandmaster.
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Chess art at Tromso

Henry_Kamsky

Henry’s game vs Kamsky. Tromso round 4

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 d6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. a3 O-O 7. Ba2 Nc6 8. d3 Rb8 9. Re1 b5 10. Ne2 a5 11. Ng3 b4 12. c3 Ba6 13. d4 bxc3 14. bxc3 Nd7 15. Bf4 e5 16. Be3 cxd4 17. cxd4 exd4 18. Nxd4 Nxd4 19. Bxd4 Ne5 20. Rb1 g6 21. Rxb8 Qxb8 22. f4 Nd3 23. Nf5 Re8 24. Nh6+ Kf8 25. Qa1 Rc8 26. Bxf7 Bh4 27. Rf1 Rc2 28. f5 Ne5 29. fxg6 Bxf1 30. Qxf1 hxg6 31. Bxg6+ Bf2+ 32. Bxf2 Kg7 33. Bh5 Kxh6 34. Be3+ Kg7 35. h4 Qc8 36. Qd1 Qc6 37. Qe1 Kh7 38. Bg5 Qc5+ 39. Kh2 Qf2 40. Qxf2 Rxf2 41. Be7 Rd2 42. Be8 Rd3 43. g3 Ng6 44. Bd8 Rxa3 45. h5 Ne5 46. Bc7 Re3 47. Bxa5 Rxe4 48. Kh3 Re2 49. Bc7 Rd2 50. g4 Kh6 51. Bb5 Kg5 52. Kg3 Nxg4 53. Bd8+ Nf6 54. h6 Kg6 55. Kf3 Rh2 56. Bc7 Rh3+ 57. Kg2 Rb3 58. Be2 Ne4 59. Bf3 Rb2+ 60. Kg1 Ng5 61. Bg2 Rd2 62. Bb6 Kxh6 63. Be3 Ra2 64. Bf4 Ra6 65. Bf1 Rb6 66. Kf2 Kg6 67. Bd3+ Kf6 68. Ke3 Nf7 69. Bc4 Ne5 70. Bg8 Ra6 71. Ke4 Ra4+ 72. Ke3 Ra8 73. Bh7 Ke6 74. Bc2 Ra3+ 75. Ke2 d5 76. Bh7 d4 77. Be4 Ra2+ 78. Kf1 Nc4 79. Ke1 Ne3 80. Bg3 Rb2 81. Bc7 Nd5 82. Bg3 Nf6 83. Bd3 Kd5 84. Bf4 Nd7 85. Bh7 Ne5 86. Bg3 Nf3+ 87. Kd1 d3 88. Bf4 0-1

kamsky

Round 4: Kamsky Photo-  @Tromso2014 

I was super excited when Gert – also a chess enthusiast, who mainly blogs about great South African Afrikaans writers and poets and writes about movies, musicians, componists, etc.  in general- informed me about the win of Henry Steel vs Gata Kamsky. I have been following this particular group of South African champs for the past few years in the ‘big‘ tournaments like these and they are a strong team of chess players and South Africa can be proud of them. Congratulations to Henry, we hope that your game against Kamsky will inspire the team to do even better. The following images are from Tromso, tweeted out to the twitter community by Susan Polgar.

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chess_sa_women_2014
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The South African Women’s Chess Championships will be held at ‘The Atrium’, The Woodlands, Johannesburg and starts on the 8th August 2014 – 10th August 2014. That’s a serious killer with 3 games per day! There is also a B-section. You can click on this PDF for all the necessary info and a link to the venue. 
2014_SA_Womens_Open_CC

chess_thelodger
Scene from ‘The Lodger: A Story Of The London Fog‘ (1927) a thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock [movie on youtube]
chess_whatsnewpussycat

Woody Allen, Peter O’Toole and Capucine, a French model and actress in ‘What’s new, Pussycat’

world_youth_chess_championships_2014

The FIDE World Youth Chess Championships 2014 will be held in Durban, South Africa from 18th September to 30th September 2014 organized by the South African Chess Federation under the auspices of FIDE. All FIDE members and chess academies are cordially invited to participate in the 2014 World Youth Chess Championships. The Local Organizing Committee is honoured to host this prestigious event and we sincerely hope that you will enjoy your visit in Africa.

Please click HERE to visit the Official site of the World Youth Chess Championship.

 

The Championships will be hosted at the International Convention Centre, Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa. The ICC Durban is one of the most advanced conference facilities in the world. The ICC Durban is purpose-built, fully air-conditioned and comprises six convention halls that are interlinked, but separate. Halls 4-6 double as convention and meetings spaces and the flat floor space for the ICC Arena makes it the leading indoor sports and entertainment venue in Durban which accommodates up to 10 000 spectators.
The latest FIDE Rules and Regulations will apply
Age Groups : u/8, u/10, u/12, u14, u/16, u/18
Format: Swiss System
Rounds: 11 rounds
Time Control: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves; Followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game; 30 seconds per move starting from move one.
Each National Federation can register a total of twelve (12) Official Players, that is, one official player in each category (under 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 years old; open and girls) plus one accompanying official, provided he/she holds a valid licence and title as a FIDE Trainer.
The players placed 1st to 3rd in the previous FIDE World Youth Championships, and the respective Champions of the 2014 Continental Youth Championships, shall have the personal rights to participate in the World Youth Championships of the corresponding age-category or a higher age category if the age stipulation is met. Such players shall also be classified as Official Players and have to be registered by their respective National Federations.

Other than Official Players, all other players shall be classified as Additional Players. All other persons other than players or the Accompanying Official shall be classified as Accompanying Persons. A Federation may register any number of Additional Players and Accompanying Persons but they shall be responsible for their own costs.
In order to provide appropriate tournament conditions, the Federations must complete the official online registration form, in full, and submit to the organising committee by no later than 17 July 2014. FIDE endorsed Chess Academies may register not more than one player per age group per gender per event. The deadline for the reservation and payment of a 50% deposit on the accommodation is 17 July 2014. Any accommodation payment made after the deadline, will incur a surcharge of 10%. Once the payment has been made, proof of payment must be sent to the Treasurer at treasurer [at]2014wycc.co.za

Durban is the largest city in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, also known as the Zulu Kingdom. Durban is also the major centre of tourism in South Africa because of the city’s warm subtropical climate and extensive beaches. Resource: Chessdom.com

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Tromso Chess 2014

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Tromso 2014 starts Friday 1st August – Thursday 14th August

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Click HERE for the schedule. These are some of the open teams that take part in this chess olympiad.

South Africa
Captain: CM Lyndon Bouah
Average Rating: 2327
1. IM Steel Henry Robert – 2399
2. IM Solomon Kenny – 2376
3. IM Kobese Watu – 2341
4. FM Van den Heever Donovan – 2277
5. IM Gluckman David – 2241

Azerbaijan
Captain: GM Alexander Khalifman
Average Rating: 2678
1. GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar – 2743
2. GM Radjabov Teimour – 2724
3. GM Mamedov Rauf – 2659
4. GM Safarli Eltaj – 2649
5. GM Guseinov Gadir – 2613

Norway 1
Captain: Ole Christian Moen
Average Rating: 2639
1. GM Carlsen Magnus – 2881
2. GM Agdestein Simen – 2628
3. GM Hammer Jon Ludvig – 2628
4. GM Johannessen Leif Erlend – 2528
5. GM Lie Kjetil A. – 2528

Netherlands
Captain: GM Vladimir B. Tukmakov
Average Rating: 2668
1. GM Giri Anish – 2752
2. GM Tiviakov Sergei – 2656
3. GM Van Wely Loek – 2654
4. GM L’Ami Erwin – 2647
5. GM Van Kampen Robin – 2631
Israel
Captain: IM Alexander Kaspi
Average Rating: 2670
1. GM Gelfand Boris – 2753
2. GM Rodshtein Maxim – 2672
3. GM Smirin Ilia – 2660
4. GM Postny Evgeny – 2641
5. GM Sutovsky Emil – 2625

England
Captain: GM Peter K Wells
Average Rating: 2673
1. GM Adams Michael – 2743
2. GM Short Nigel D – 2665
3. GM Jones Gawain – 2654
4. GM Sadler Matthew – 2653
5. GM Howell David – 2650

China
Captain: GM Jun Xu
Average Rating: 2679
1. GM Ding Liren – 2714
2. GM Wang Yue – 2713
3. GM Yu Yangyi – 2675
4. GM Ni Hua – 2653
5. GM Wei Yi – 2634

United States of America
Captain: IM John W. Donaldson
Average Rating: 2686
1. GM Nakamura Hikaru – 2775
2. GM Kamsky Gata – 2712
3. GM Onischuk Alexander – 2659
4. GM Akobian Varuzhan – 2653
5. GM Shankland Samuel L – 2632

Hungary
Captain: IM Tamas Horvath
Average Rating: 2693
1. GM Leko Peter – 2737
2. GM Rapport Richard – 2701
3. GM Almasi Zoltan – 2692
4. GM Polgar Judit – 2685
5. GM Balogh Csaba – 2648

France
Captain: GM Sebastien Maze
Average Rating: 2705
1. GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime – 2762
2. GM Bacrot Etienne – 2720
3. GM Fressinet Laurent – 2717
4. GM Edouard Romain – 2702
5. GM Tkachiev Vladislav – 2625

Russia
Captain: GM Yury Dokhoian
Average Rating: 2767
1. GM Grischuk Alexander – 2792
2. GM Kramnik Vladimir – 2783
3. GM Karjakin Sergey – 2771
4. GM Svidler Peter – 2753
5. GM Jakovenko Dmitry – 2736

Ukraine
Captain: GM Oleksandr Sulypa
Average Rating: 2714
1. GM Ivanchuk Vassily – 2738
2. GM Eljanov Pavel – 2723
3. GM Ponomariov Ruslan – 2723
4. GM Moiseenko Alexander – 2707
5. GM Korobov Anton – 2680

Tromso_chess_women

Click on THIS LINK to view more players and their profiles.
Tromso_chess-

 

Tromso-Women


Picture:Chess News Agency

Turrets and Chess


I had been on a course and it was held at this beautiful place in Lincolnshire. It was a residential course and I couldn’t help to immerse myself completely into this historical swamp. When I looked at the mansion and the structure of the building, I found myself in a game of chess, moving turrets and spikes around, wondering about the conversations that took place at this place by noble men and women, throughout the centuries. I also wondered about the Romans who roamed the area and the meetings during WW2, when the Second Battalion of the Parachute Regiment used it. In the late 40’s teachers got trained here till the late 1970’s and today it belongs to one of the largest Teacher Unions for training sessions and conferences. 

The obelisk was erected by Charles Turnor, 1847, in honour of Isaac Newton, who acquired his basic education in the area of Stoke, the area where this mansion-hotel is. The Turnor family owned the original property from as early as the 1700’s till 1940.


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Excavations at a burial site in south-east Turkey have revealed a set of 49 sculpted pieces that may once have been used in board games. They are among the oldest evidence of such games ever found.

Sağlamtimur, from Ege university in Izmir, Turkey discussed the finds at the annual International Symposium of Excavations, Surveys and Archaeometry in the Turkish city of Muğla. He thinks the pieces belong to some complicated chess-like game. His team now hopes to work out the strategies that the game must have involved.

Not so fast, says Ulrich Schädler, director of the Swiss Museum of Games in La Tour-de-Peilz. “Do the objects really all belong to one game? I would answer no,” he told New Scientist. “We don’t have the slightest trace of a board game using more than two different kinds of pieces before chess.” Early forms of chess were not played until about 1500 years ago. Read the entire article here.

Chess is believed to have first originated in Eastern India known as Chaturanga. The game spread from India to Persia and after the Islamic conquering of the Persian empire it was adopted by them and spread even further afield with it’s name changed to shatranj. The Islamic world then spread chess throughout Europe and then to Russia. On this link you can read more about the history of ancient games relating to chess.

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Image: Wikipedia – Shatranj

Senet was played between 1550-1069 BC in Egypt. In the next image you can see a painting on the wall of Queen Nefertari’s tomb depicting her playing the game in the afterlife. 

You can download this file for  the rules of Senet

Chess_Senet-Queen-Nefertari

Egyptian Chess

Image source here.

This game in the above image has been found painted on the funeral tombs of the rich and which shows a lion and an antelope playing the game of Senet.

According to the British Museum, it’s a scene from a satirical papyrus, possibly from Thebes, the Late New Kingdom, around 1100 BC.

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I hope you make out my ‘collage.’ I will also call it: ‘The Endless Game.’ Here is the original on the site of the LoC.

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This is all about a  beautiful style of art called: ‘Fore-Edge painting’. I didn’t know about this kind of art. What you see in this above image, is the edges of the pages of this chess book. It’s amazing! See also the video clip.

Resource: Please click here to view the resource on the site of  Boston’s Public Library. 

Fragments

Chess Personality

chessknight

Masterminds seek to master both their own emotions and to impose their reality on the chessboard. A Mastermind always seeks the right move, and believes that attacking is the right way. Typically choosing sharp openings, Masterminds win with fantastically deep calculations, producing combinations which are deeply hidden in correctly built-up positions. Masterminds thrive in complicated positions, where their accurate calculating ability and iron nerves give them the advantage.

alexandre-alekhine
Alexander Alekhine is a Mastermind

Alexander Alekhine (1892-1946), the fourth world champion, was a true Mastermind. One of the greatest attacking players ever, Alekhine could produce spectacular combinations from positions which seemed to promise no such thing. His calculation ability was phenomenal, and his combinations often included deadly and unexpected surprises at the end of a series of obvious moves: the famous “sting of the scorpion’s tail”. Most important was his ability to build up an attacking position and create complications without taking undue risks himself. Alekhine held the world championship from 1927 until 1935, when he lost a match to Max Euwe, and then from 1937 (after beating Euwe in the return match) until his death in 1946.

chess_personality

I was intrigued when I was sent this link on Twitter. I quite liked the questions, as there are a few chess problems to look at and to work through, not the normal options where you choose either a, b or c. According to the link, my play is similar to Alekhine’s play. Hmmmm… what do you think of the test? Take the test and let me know. Do you trust it? Some of my chess opponents had said to me that I’m an aggressive player, but not really sure if I am that kind of player. I know I like to attack, whenever I can, but only if I know I can benefit from it, depending on my position and I do like complicated positions. The scale on the above image was different. I navigated away from the link and when I returned, aggressive and calm was also on the end of the scale. My original setting was slightly to the right, more to ‘solid‘ and the same for ‘calm’. I wonder what my chess friend in South Korea is thinking, or Dan, my other chess friend? Eugene doesn’t want to play me, he is scared of me… hehe

Click HERE to take the Chess Personality ‘Test’.

Happy New Year

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I’ve been playing around – as you can see. Happy New Year to you all! May 2014 be the best year ever. I do pray for peace all over the world and for those with evil minds – to poach more rhinos – will come to their senses – and all other evil-minded people too. I wish for a ‘fresh start’ for all countries and people and to bury their differences and live in peace and harmony.

1898 Chess

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Please click HERE to view the image by emmyeustace  on Flickr.


…and you …. and you… May you all be blessed with the blessings of God.


An Afrikaans song about Christmas – Somer Kersfees [Summer Christmas]
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This is a video I created a few years ago, enjoy and Merry Christmas

Listen to John Lennon: ‘So this is Christmas’

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Rhino-Stop-Illegal-Wildlife-Trade Click on the poster for a  large view Mr Cameron/Mr Obama YOU are part of the poaching and the killing of rhinos! You are also fueling this horrible slaughtering that’s going on! You feel nothing for these animals. You turn a blind eye and look the other way! WHY? Because of GREED – money! Mr Cameron, why do you make it EASIER for the Chinese to come to Britain if you KNOW this is what they DO? I will answer your question for you, it’s simple. GREED. MONEY. Is that what matters to you? Yes, it is, simple. Common sense. You will never make a move to protect these animals. What can I do? – you are asking. Why don’t you ask the Chinese to stop the killing and poaching, before you relax the rules for them to come to Britain? Simple answer, you will not do it, simple reason: GREED. The same with Mr Obama. Our leaders DO NOT care. The rhino has only us as humans as its enemy. What do we do? Answer the question to yourself. Simple, easy. Poach them! All for GREED. You also don’t have the guts to tell the Chinese, in their faces! – that the rhino horn is like your finger nails, made of keratin, and has NO medicine-value for anything.  Are you too scared to tell them, what kind of ‘leader’ are you? Within 5 days the statistics: 825 – 850 rhinos poached in South Africa – ONLY – this is nearly 100 more than 2012. We have 1 month left. It is going to be 940 for 2013 – my prediction – or even more. rhinoshame rhinostats2013

All five kinds of rhino species alive today face some kind of threat, whether from poaching, loss of habitat through deforestation or human settlements encroaching on their land. Demand for rhino horn is driven by lucrative criminal trafficking and the belief in some Asian countries that it can cure cancer and other ailments, though experts say the horn has no special powers and is made of the same material as fingernails. “Despite the crisis, there is hope for rhinos,” Ms Ellis said. “We believe that the situation can be turned around. The sticking point is whether rhino countries like South Africa and consumer countries like Vietnam and China will enforce their laws and whether countries like Indonesia will take the bold actions needed to save Sumatran and Javan rhinos.” As few as 100 Sumatran rhinos are left, and there are around 44 Javan rhinos. Both are critically endangered and considered on the brink of extinction. The State of the Rhino report also warned of “recent increases in poaching activity in northeastern India,” home to the greater one-horned rhino of which about 3,300 remain in the world. Detailing steps forward in the worldwide effort to save the ancient creatures, it touted some successes in Botswana, Zimbabwe, India and Indonesia, and urged officials to ramp up their efforts to protect rhinos and their habitat. Source: http://www.news.com.au/world/rhino-killings-nearly-outnumber-births-international-rhino-foundation-says/story-fndir2ev-1226766652314

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Click HERE for the Official site.

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Game 1
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Game 1: Carlsen vs Anand 1/2

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Images: Official site: chennai2013.fide.com

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Moves: game 1
1. Nf3 d
2. g3 g6
3. Bg2 Bg7
4. d4 c6
5. O-O Nf6
6. b3 O-O
7. Bb2 Bf5
8. c4 Nbd7
9. Nc3 dxc4
10. bxc4 Nb6
11. c5 Nc4
12. Bc1 Nd5
13. Qb3 Na5
14. Qa3 Nc4
15. Qb3 Na5
16. Qa3 Nc4
#FWCM2013  #AnandCarlsen

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The King vs The Crown Prince

Game 1 – Live

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Anand vs Carlsen – Game 2 move 1-7

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Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 8-14

Anand_Carlsen_game2_1Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 15-21

Anand_Carlsen_game2_finalAnand vs Carlsen Game 2 Final position 1/2

Game 2 Live

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Game 3 Photo: Official Site
Game 3: DRAW
Carlsen vs Anand 1/2
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. c4 dxc4 4. Qa4+ Nc6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Nc3 e5 7. Qxc4 Nge7 8. O-O O-O 9. d3 h6 10. Bd2 Nd4 11. Nxd4 exd4 12. Ne4 c6 13. Bb4 Be6 14. Qc1 Bd5 15. a4 b6 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. a5 Rab8 18. Re1 Rfc8 19. axb6 axb6 20. Qf4 Rd8 21. h4 Kh7 22. Nd2 Be5 23. Qg4 h5 24. Qh3 Be6 25. Qh1 c5 26. Ne4 Kg7 27. Ng5 b5 28. e3 dxe3 29. Rxe3 Bd4 30. Re2 c4 31. Nxe6+ fxe6 32. Be4 cxd3 33. Rd2 Qb4 34. Rad1 Bxb2 35. Qf3 Bf6 36. Rxd3 Rxd3 37. Rxd3 Rd8 38. Rxd8 Bxd8 39. Bd3 Qd4 40. Bxb5 Qf6 41. Qb7+ Be7 42. Kg2 g5 43. hxg5 Qxg5 44. Bc4 h4 45. Qc7 hxg3 46. Qxg3 e5 47. Kf3 Qxg3+ 48. fxg3 Bc5 49. Ke4 Bd4 50. Kf5 Bf2 51. Kxe5 Bxg3+ ½-½

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Game 3 move 29
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Game 3 final position

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Game 4: Anand vs Carlsen 1/2 Draw
Moves
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 ½-½
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Game 4 move 33

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Game 4 – Final position

Game 5 – Magnus 1 Anand 0

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Game 6 Anand vs Carlsen – move 28

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Game 6 move 32 – I feel Anand could have made a better move with his pawn on d, which he ‘gave’ away.
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Game 6 move 33 – game looks like a draw to me – Anand not sure what to do? Bet you they are going to draw this one!
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Game 6 still going – move 41

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Game 6 Final Move – Anand 0 – Magnus 1

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You believe that a rhino horn is not made of the same substance as your finger nails and that it is able to cure any diseases like cancer. So start chewing your finger nail if you are a Chinese – you don’t need a rhino horn!

You do to rhinos what the Chinese and their poachers do.

You are the head of the Chinese Government and refuse to get rid of your ancient beliefs and you refuse to admit those beliefs are rubbish.

You are from Vietnam and use the horn as medicine. How insane.

You are one of the following and do this! 

In the Middle Eastern country of Yemen, the horn continues to be coveted by Muslim men, although imports were banned in 1982. The material, whose luster increases with age, is used for the handles of curved daggers called “jambiya,” which are presented to Yemeni boys at age 12. Jambiya are considered a sign of manhood and devotion to the Muslim religion, and are used for personal defense. Yemeni men place great value on the dagger handles, which are commonly studded with jewels. In China, the ornamental use of rhino horn dates back to at least the 7th century AD. Over the centuries, rhino horns have been carved into ceremonial cups, as well as buttons, belt buckles, hair pins, and paperweights.

You feel absolutely nothing for an animal, and allow them to suffer in any way. 

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You are the President of South Africa and you feel nothing and don’t want to do anything, as you have a hand in the pie with the Chinese! You’re laughing your way to the bank. Your wives are more important to you, you have recently married another one!

You, as the President, allow these poachers and you are not moving a finger to do more than what you can do. We all know you can do more! Much more…. e.g. Ban those Chinese companies, popping up – suddenly – like mushrooms all over the country! Send them all home! Tell them in their faces what you think of them… Uhm, sorry forgot what this entry is all about…so you can’t do it…. Shame on you!

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The art of Dolfi Stoki – this is what the R10 note should be looking like.

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God will not forgive anyone for what you do to these animals, whatever the reason behind your motive. The rhinos do not deserve to suffer like they do!
If you want to see HOW these rhinos really suffer, visit this link on youtube, warning!! It is a grossly upsetting to look at, but that is REALITY!!!
(youtube.com/watch?v=6MIbJR4b7UY)

Latest statistics: 11/10/2013 – 746 rhinos poached, 16 more after 5/10/2013: 730 – Rate of poaching: 2-5 per day.

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SONY DSCOne of many posters for my class assembly that was yesterday. We had a mini-campaign about the rhinos. If you have my class blog link, you can read more and see a video clip as well. We are taking part in the travelling rhinos project.

A newspaper article about the Viatnamese to read.

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Chess and Nabokov

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Nabokov in MontreuxSwitzerland – image: Wikipedia

Nabokov was a Russian Novelist, but also a chess composer. I was reading about ‘reading’  and ‘readers’ when I came across him – see the section about Jose’s blog where everything started this morning. I found his background very interesting -he was a chess composer, but not a chess player himself. I didn’t know about chess composers and found it quite odd that he actually never played. If he’s a composer of chess, then he must have been a good player as well. It’s interesting to see a writer turning game play into narratives. Even in his book Lolita, he uses chess as part of his narrative.

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This was his 3rd novel he wrote, turned into a movie. From google-books the review:  The Defense, is a chilling story of obsession and madness. As a young boy, Luzhin was unattractive,  distracted, withdrawn, sullen–an enigma to his parents and an object of ridicule to his classmates. He takes up chess as a refuge from the anxiety of his everyday life.  His talent is prodigious and he rises to the rank of grandmaster–but at a cost:  in Luzhin’ s obsessive mind, the game of chess gradually supplants the world of reality.   His own world falls apart during a crucial championship match, when the intricate defense he has devised withers  under his opponent’s unexpected and unpredictabke lines of assault.[note to self: must try and read some of his books one day]

This is a quote from Wikipedia, and it’s worth reading more on Wikipedia about him: Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov; 22 April  1899 – 2 July 1977- was a Russian-born novelist. Nabokov’s first nine novels were in Russian. He then rose to international prominence as a writer of English prose. He also made serious contributions as a lepidopterist and chess composer. Nabokov’s Lolita (1955) is his most famous novel, and often considered his finest work in English. It exhibits the love of intricate word play and synesthetic detail that characterised all his works. The novel was ranked fourth in the list of the Modern Library 100 Best Novels; Pale Fire (1962) was ranked at 53rd on the same list, and his memoir, Speak, Memory, was listed eighth on the Modern Library nonfiction list. He was a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction seven times, but never won it.

After the 1917 February Revolution, Nabokov’s father became a secretary of the Russian Provisional Government, and the family was forced to flee the city – after the Bolshevik Revolution – for Crimea, not expecting to be away for very long. They lived at a friend’s estate and in September 1918 moved to Livadiya; Nabokov’s father was a minister of justice of the Crimean provisional government. After the withdrawal of the German Army (November 1918) and the defeat of the White Army in early 1919, the Nabokovs sought exile in western Europe. On 2 April 1919, the family left Sevastopol on the last ship, then settled briefly in England. Vladimir enrolled in Trinity College, Cambridge, studying zoology at first, and then Slavic and Romance languages. He later drew on his Cambridge experiences to write the novel Glory. In 1920, his family moved to Berlin, where his father set up the émigré newspaper Rul’ (Rudder). Nabokov would follow to Berlin after his studies at Cambridge two years later.In March 1922, Nabokov’s father was assassinated in Berlin by Russian monarchist Piotr Shabelsky-Bork as he was trying to shield the real target, Pavel Milyukov, a leader of the Constitutional Democratic Party-in-exile. This mistaken, violent death would echo again and again in Nabokov’s fiction, where characters would meet their deaths under accidental terms. (In Pale Fire, for example, one interpretation of the novel has an assassin mistakenly kill the poet John Shade, when his actual target is a fugitive European monarch.) Shortly after his father’s death, Nabokov’s mother and sister moved to Prague.

I was reading Jose-English102’s blog about Nabokov about reading and I quote from his blog what Nabokov says: ‘According to Nabokov, a good reader should ‘ notice and fondle details.’ He believes that a good reader should use their imagination to visualize the story and try to understand it from the writers point of view, instead of making assumptions. He says that a good reader must re-read to be able to fully understand what the author is trying to say and to paint a better picture in their mind of the story. Nabokov also mentioned that a good reader should have a good imagination, memory, a dictionary, and some artistic sense.’

From ‘Brainpickings’ I found this interview: In the fall of 1969, British broadcaster and journalist James Mossman submitted 58 questions on literature and life for celebrated author Vladimir Nabokov — butterfly-lover, master of melancholy, frequenter of ideal bookshelves — for an episode of BBC-2′s Review. Nabokov ended up answering 40 of them in what is best described as part interview, part performance art, eventually published in Strong Opinions (UK; public library) — a 1973 collection of Nabokov’s finest interviews, articles and editorials. Some of the conversation is preserved in this rare original audio, with highlights transcribed below:

Away from Hades

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Sharlto Copley – as Kruger
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Alice Braga as Frey
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Jodie Foster – an Official – Secretary Delacourt
I’ve been ‘treated’ to see this movie, Elysium. I’ve read a couple of reviews about the movie afterwards, to see if others agree with what I thought about it. Firstly, this type of movie is really not my cuppa tea, but I’ve decided to enjoy the evening, despite the type of movie.  I prefer movies that’s about reality, or reality mixed with adventure or some action – only some action– and I love any cowboy-type of movies or westerns. When I left school, I was into action/thrillers/and Jackie Chan-type of movies. I still enjoy Jackie Chan from time to time. What I really don’t like, is fighting scenes one after the other or brutality and in Elysium, you get too much of the fighting at one stage – for too long. I get bored and I don’t like the fighting, it’s not nice. I switch off and want the ‘show to move on’, though I like the idea of Blomkamp, to have a world where everything is ‘beautiful’ or ‘perfect’.  Also, Jodie Foster didn’t have much of a role in this movie, I was a bit disappointed, as she is a great actress. I enjoyed most of the movie, but I felt at points the viewer is not really sure what is happening and you guess a little bit. I love the few Afrikaans and South African English slang in the movie – ‘Ouk, It’s lekka man, you’ll dig it!’ –  and smiled big time when Copley sang ‘Jan Pierewiet’. The South African flag on his ship immediately caught my eye and also the Gemsbok painted on the front left! I will definitely recommend this movie, but don’t expect it to be a 9 or a 10. Here’s some good reviews to read: Click HERE to read some reviews on ‘Rottentomatoes‘. You can also watch some clips of the actors and what they say about the movie on this link. Edit: This movie is also classified as a ‘thriller’, which I disagree. I’ve seen a couple of thrillers and this was nothing like a thriller to me. I would say it’s more an ‘action’ film, rather than a ‘thriller’.  About Blomkamp and the movie I would like to say this: As he is only 32, I think this movie is actually a brilliant movie for a director of his age. If this is what he produces at the age of 32, then I can only predict ‘big time movies‘ from him over the next 10 years – and more.

A bit cheeky!

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How cheeky can one get? I found this on Facebook! This is not me, but how cheeky to nick my blog’s header for her FB-account, plus to use my blog’s name. My question: does she pretend to be ‘me’?

The Camp

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Picture from FB: Mother with her dead child – Boer War: Concentration camps. I was so shocked when I saw this picture. How this mother must have felt and the poor little kids. This is what went through my mind:

The camp
White tents like white ant hills.
Strange, awkward stenches fill the war-torn air
Weak, though proud, with no disinfectant
Sitting around in poverty: deprived!
Waiting for food. Waiting for water.
Humiliation. Disgrace. Filth.
Dead bodies carried along white rows
They don’t care, they don’t think!
They can’t think. They  just kill!
The pain inside: it cuts deep, very deep.
No sound. No breath. No life.
No words. No food. Only thoughts.
Only thoughts. Only Blue vitriol.
Children crying, children dying

Hunger screams, hunger wails
Endless waiting.  Timeless prayers.
Shock. Horror. Pain.
Forgotten lives.
Panic. Fright. Terror.
God! My child is dead!
Footsteps. No words.
Empty arms. Eyes watching.
Not my child!
Patience because:
‘Another seepkissie will arrive soon.’
Silence.

Nikita 22/8/2013

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The Victorian & Albert Museum – a trip today, enjoy!

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From the Asian collection – painting with a cotton layer on the back

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Beautiful patterns

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Paint – apparently from Burhanpur, late 1700’s till early 1800’s

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Small detail on this chess board

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Basin – how beautiful!

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Stained Glass

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Candle holder – 1840’s +

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Porcelain – 1840’s +

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Looking through the tiny window

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Statue in the garden

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Life is good on the underground – for the pigeons

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Musician in the ‘Underground’

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‘Going West’

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Do I notice a Springbok somewhere?

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It’s on the floor, bring your own pieces

‘n Lewe verkort

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image:kerkbode.co.za

‘n Lewe verkort

Die beklemmende gedagte:
onbewustelik ‘n verbintenis
stigmatisering, diskriminered,
wraaksugtig, miskennend
onbeskermd…

‘n Lewe verkort

In die binneste
van jou siel:
jou fisieke, jou psige
vasgevang – die vrees
vasgeknoop – die woede

Ingelaat en toegelaat,
onbeplan, ongenaakbaar
grusaam en gruwelooslik
deurboor dit jou vlees.

Sirkelend alom jou siel:
geregtigheid, regverdigheid
melaatsheid en dilemmas
lugleegtes van pleidooie.

Slagoffer van die dood.

++Nikita++ 18/8/2013

Nadat ‘n blogleser, Azile, op hierdie link ‘n versoek gerig het, het ek ‘gehoor’ gegee. Sy het gevra vir ‘n gedig oor ‘Vigs’, in Afriaans. Wel, soos almal teen hierdie tyd weet – dat ek nie ‘n professionele digter is nie, en ek  wou my ook nie laat afsit deur hierdie doktor na wie ‘Brieweuitdievreemde‘ verwys nie- hoop ek die geskribbel maak vir jou sin. Dus, as jy ‘n professionele digter is – of kenner van Afrikaans – lees asseblief met ‘ander‘ ogies na hierdie ‘geskribbel’. Vir die dokters wil ek graag sê: Spandeer jul etenstye deur Opperman se Groot Verseboek en Verswêreld   te lees. Alhoewel daar ‘n paar ‘moderne‘ byvoegings in Verswêreld is wat ek nie dink daar behoort te wees nie – my opinie. ‘n Ander vraag: Hoe word ‘n Eugene Marais prys toegeken aan ‘n digter wat sy taal meng, dan nog ook erg  onsmaaklike Afrikaanse woorde in sy gedigte inwerk? Yuk! Wat sou EMarais daarvan gedink het? <sug, watter tipe beoordeelaars het ons in Afrikaans vandag? Red Afrikaans….iemand, asseblief>

English readers: I was asked by Azile, on the above link for an Afrikaans poem about Aids, this is what this entry is about.


reading, reading, reading, reading
reading, writing, writing, reading
more reading, more writing and even more reading
reading books, reading journals, reading bits, reading blobs
reading reading reading reading
writing writing writing writing
and more, and more, more, more and more
I can’t stop reading, writing and reading
I’m going mad, I’m going crazy
I love the reading, but not the writing
Finally, I’m finished, finished, finished
with my assignment, assignment, assignment
off to hand, hand, hand it in!
enjoy, enjoy, enjoy, enjoy the music!
I need to get back to normal
enjoy the music!
off to hand in my assignment
I am finally finished
I can stop myself now from reading
I can stop myself now from writing
I think I’m back to normal
Back to my old self and ready to relax!
Enjoy the music
F is for… Friday!

Update: results

5th October 2013

Got a B for my assignment – very happy me! 

B

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@TarjeiJS Tweeted this: ‘Article of the dn.no announcing his new sponsorship deal with Nordic Semiconductor’ 

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The view from Tromso, as tweeted by Svensen: ‘The view from my room is acceptable!’ – he is also tweeting about the Tromso Chess World Cup tournament
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‘Millions flowing in for chess ace’

Magnus and the article as translated by ‘google-translate’ The article can be read in the Norwegian language from the link at the bottom of the entry. To all those little 10 year old boys always saying, ‘ I want to be a footballer’ – what about: ‘I want to be a Magnus Carlsen’ [hehe]

Norwegian sponsors will use the world’s best chess player opener with large customers, writing Todays Market.

On Saturday puts Magnus Carlsen heading to Chennai in India to prepare for the World Cup tournament pending against Viswanathan Anand in November.

On Monday techno now Nordic Semiconductor Carlsen fifth main, next to the law firm Simonsen, brokerage Arctic, newspaper VG house and software company Parallels.

Will he win the World Cup waiting nine million kroner in prize money. In addition, there are about six million in sponsorship revenue and miscellaneous other income.

Thankful
After the DN understand the young chess player will stand to gain a gross turnover of between 15 and 20 million years.

The money goes through the company Magnus Chess, which since 2007 has had a total turnover of 27 million. The profit before tax amounts to 15 million dollars, and Carlsen had at the end of 2012, built up a solid equity of nearly 12 million.

‘ I am very grateful that I can live on something I think is so fun. Beyond that I’m not thinking so much about it’, says Magnus Carlsen about their financial chess moves.

Please click here to read the original article.

Tromso, Norway

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It is time for the Chess World Cup 2013 – in Norway
Please click here for the official site.
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Photo and message from Europe-Echecs Twitter account See the official video to know who is taking part. My favourite this time? I think Etienne Bacrot.

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Chess Players arriving at the university of Tromso for the opening ceremony – photo SPolgar [twitter]

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Susan Polgar doing exactly what she says on these tweets

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Susan interviews her ‘baby’ sister, Judit on 13/8/2013

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NO Susan, he is NOT funny and insightful, read HERE why I don’t think he is and make sure you read the first 10 lines carefully. [hmf]
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Tromso – image: Barents Observer

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Lovely colourful houses in Tromso [image:getintotravel]

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Tromso Chess – 17/8/2013 Game 3 round 1

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Tromso round 3 tight security

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Final game 1 – Kramnik wins

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It was just me, playing around with Adobe Fireworks – the ‘old’ and the ‘new’ – I’m actually busy with my 5000-word assignment, therefore the ‘silence’ – but one needs a ‘break’, so it’s my excuse to do something else, other than reading and writing. My brain feels like a sieve.


image:thefloridaproject

Read here more about the ‘online rumor’ of the Pirates in the dungeons. On the link you will find a series of images taken over seven years about this chess ‘game’. 

The King’s Game

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Royal game: The chess board believed to have been owned by King Charles I, which has been sold for a record breaking £600,000 at an auction.

An amber chess board taken by King Charles 1 to his execution has been sold for a record £600,000. The board was owned by the controversial King, who was such an enthusiast for chess he was engrossed in a game when a messenger told him he had been betrayed by the Scots to the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War. The news sealed the royal’s fate and he was executed on January 30, 1649. It is known the King took with him two precious possessions to the scaffold where he was beheaded: a Bible and an amber games board, believed to be the one that has now sold for £601,250. Erik Bijzet, an expert in European sculpture at auctioneers Sotherby’s, said: ‘This board was made by Georg Schreiber who was known as the “King of the Gamesboards”. ‘He was an amber worker in Koeningsberg, the capital of Prussia, where amber washed up on the shores of the East Sea in small amounts.

Chess enthusiast: Charles, pictured with what is believed to be a chess piece around his neck, was an avid fan of the ‘King’s Game’, known to have been used to teach war strategy‘The board is dated 1607 and was given to either James I or Henry Frederick as Charles was only seven-years-old then. ‘When at the height of the Civil War a messenger arrived to inform Charles that he had been betrayed by the Scots he didn’t rise from his game of chess, even though his fate had effectively been sealed.
‘Charles took a Bible and a games board with him to the scaffold where he was beheaded.’ Following his death the items were passed on to his personal chaplain, Bishop William Juxon, who read Charles his last rites. The board then remained in his family until the 18th century before it was acquired by British peer Sir Robert Hesketh. It has now been sold by the Second Baron Hesketh’s Will Trust. The board was bought at auction in London by a private collector, following a dramatic bidding war, for £601,250, the highest amount ever paid for an amber games board. Mr Bijzet said: ‘It entered into the ownership of the Hesketh family and an inventory of their possessions is the earliest record that mentions that the board belonged to Charles.

‘Besides the provenance, this board is a tour-de-force of amber working, is of superb quality and was made by the maker of Royal chess sets.
‘We only know of four comparable boards, none of which have seemed to survive in good condition.’ The board, which measures 27ins by 13ins, opens into two halves, allowing it to be used for different games including chess, backgammon, draughts and Nine Men’s Morris, a strategy board game which emerged from the Roman Empire. The board would have been extremely sought after and expensive during the 17th century due to amber being found only in small quantities.
Source: Follow THIS LINK for more images as well.

KingCharles

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Image: Norwaychess

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Congratulations to Sergey Karjakin [left]- the winner of Norway Chess 2013

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Third time lucky

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Since our topic is WW2 in school, I was looking for something for the children to do, which is more fun than the usual writing or ‘normal’ art. The idea of transferring WW2 images and newspaper clippings came to my mind and I immediately performed a search with the phrase: ‘how to transfer images to fabric‘ and voila! The first link was from the blog:  ‘A beautiful mess‘, which was easy to follow and fun to do. As always, I was too curious and couldn’t wait for the results, though I thought my first try wasn’t too bad. [first image]. Immediately after the first try, I started the second, still very excited and inspired. You can see my second try, looking a bit more ‘faded’ than the first one. I quite like it, as it gives you the impression of a very old piece dated from the war, but my two clear words at the bottom don’t serve it any good. Also, I covered with mod podge, which gives the glossy look, also not really what I originally planned or will do again. So, third try next – the Queen with princess Margaret, broadcasting a message during WW2 to the children, plus some other children – stamp images mixed with news headline bits. This time I applied more of the liquidtex and waited patiently till the following morning. Well, I was impressed. You can see it on the display image, but it’s there temporally, as I’m waiting for the school’s order to go through, so my children can do their own. On the display you can also see their collages, which they put together with paint.net. Some used a single picture and applied the ‘effects’-tool to enhance their pictures. The transferring was really fun and I can’t wait for the children to do theirs, so I can have fun again!  Click HERE for full instructions step-by-step explained by the blog of  ‘A beautiful mess’.

wwwwww

wwwww

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SONY DSC

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SONY DSC

I had a free visit to Bletchley Park today. The reason: I’m taking our Y5-children on a trip to Bletchley Park this year, as the Imperial War Museum in London is busy undergoing renovations and will open only partially in July and I had to do my ‘pre-visit‘, which is free for teachers to complete the risk assessment before the trip. I’m overexcited about this trip as I wanted to take my class to Bletchley Park two years ago. I have blogged before about Bletchley Park on this link, if you have time to go and read about MI5, chess,  the cold war and the link to Bletchley Park. There are lots to see at Bletchley Park, and I particularly enjoyed the Churchill collection today. Churchill used a little teddy as a place holder when he removed a book from his shelf and I’ve thought it was a ‘cool‘ idea. Bletchley Park is also undergoing a big change after campaigns to save this interesting and special place, though they need more money to save it for future generations.  A few years ago, it was discovered that the buildings started crumbling down and few people started campaigning. Today, after my visit of two years ago, I could already see a major change and I can honestly recommend a visit to Bletchley Park [in Milton Keynes] if you are near enough to visit. The train station is about 5 min walk from it, which makes it even more accessible for non-drivers. Bletchley Park is where the WW2 Code breakers worked in secrecy and WW2 could have lasted about two more years, if it wasn’t for them! Just think how many more people could have died as well. Feel free to click on photos for a larger view.

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SONY DSC

anand_magnus_chennai_

New Delhi: Viswanathan Anand will defend his World Chess Championship title against world number one Magnus Carlsen in his home city as FIDE today chose Chennai as the venue for the prestigious match.

Even as it has been reported that Carlsen was not keen to play in Chennai and instead preferred Paris as the venue, the FIDE Presidential Board confirmed Chennai as the venue during a meeting at Baku, Azerbaijan today.

The match between the Indian and his Norwegian opponent will be played from November 6 to 26.

“The agreement was signed today at Baku by Bharat Singh, Hony Secretary All India Chess Federation and FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov,” a press released stated.

Anand had defeated Boris Gelfand of Israel to retain his title in 2012. Source: Zeenews.india

Farewell Farewell

A variation on the Cento – used Shakespeare-lines about Chess

There stands the castle!
My day’s delight is past
great shouts within
and all cry

A horse! A horse!
I have a horse and
a wandering knight.
My skipping king
ambles up and down

A wandering knight?
The knight is here
… a mean knight

The hour is almost past
Farewell Farewell


It’s hilarious – Carlsen’s coach?

We are asleep

quote_1
image:quotespictures.net

chess_candidates_2013

chess_candidates_2013_Radjabov

Kramnik overtakes Carlsen in the
 lead after dramatic 12th round FIDE Candidates. Follow the link to read the complete report on round 12.

candidates_2013
Round 13
candidates_2013_
Round 13
candidatesround14Round 14
candidatesround14-1Round 14
candidatesround14-2Round 14 – Final moves

Hot gates!

striking song by Laurika. How many places and people can we add for a second song?

London Paris Rome Berlin
Barcelona Washington
Moscow Beijing Tokyo
Jerusalem Jericho
Waco Waco Bethlehem
Srebrenica Sebokeng
Sarajevo O Saigon
Hiroshima Rubicon
CHORUS:
I can see a fiery, fiery glow
Even as the sun is sinking low
I can see a horseman on the run
Oh my daughter, oh my son

Dunkirk Dover Normandy
Frankfurt New York Lockerbie
Amajuba Bellevue
Chappaquiddick Waterloo

Bucharest St Petersburg
Heilbron Hobhouse Gettysburg
Belfast Budapest Baghdad
Berchtesgaden Stalingrad

CHORUS

Carthage Dresden Babylon
Sharpeville My Lai Boipatong
Delville Wood El Alamein
St Helena Mitchell’s Plain

Balaklava Austerlitz
Belsen Buchenwald Auschwitz
Nagasaki o Versailles
Armageddon Thermopylae

CHORUS

REPEAT CHORUS:
There’s another song that will be sung
There’s another bell that must be rung
There’s another city I’ve been told
Where the streets are paved with gold

There’s another city I’ve been told
Where the streets are paved with gold

 hotgates

Have you read The Hot Gates? The author of ‘Lord of the Flies‘ – which I had as a prescribed book at the age of 14 and found the story very upsetting at the time.

chessriver

Anyone for making their chess move in a freezing cold river? See the artist on this link of Deviantart – and a larger image.

Wandering Knight

chessmaster_giovanni_leonardo_di_bona
Image: Wikimedia

This painting is a great painting, read the explanation of Wikipedia.
Click HERE to play through the chess games of Di Bona on the site of chessgames.com. Di Bona was called ‘the wandering knight’.
Giovanni Leonardo di Bona or Giovanni Leonardo da Cutri (both given names can be seen also in the reversed order Leonardo Giovanni), known as Il Puttino (Italian Small Child) (1542–1587) was an early Italian chess master. Giovanni Leonardo was born in Cutro, Calabria. He studied law in Rome. In 1560, he lost a match to Ruy López in Rome. In 1566–1572, he travelled and played chess in Rome, Genoa, Marseille, Barcelona. He had played many times against Paolo Boi in Italy and they were regarded as being equal in their chess strength. Giovanni Leonardo di Bona won the first known international master tournament in the history of chess in Madrid in 1575, therefore becoming the strongest chess master of the time. After their success at the Court of Spain, Leonardo and Paolo Boi, both travelled, although separately, to Lisbon, where they tested their chess skill against Il Moro, the eminent chess champion of King Don Sebastian, of Portugal. Again, they both succeeded, first Leonardo, soon followed by Paolo Boi, in defeating Il Moro. And again the King was generous with his rewards. After this triumph, Giovanni Leonardo di Bona, having been called the wandering knight (Il Cavaliere errante) by King Don Sebastian, left Portugal to return to Italy and settle in Naples where he became the chess master for the Prince of Bisignano.

Source: Wikipedia

This game on the following link,[where I played black] is a more recent game, which I played in 2011. I usually like Knights more than Bishops and in this game you can see why. I would like to call this Knight ‘the wandering Knight‘ [as well] I love my Pawns too, they can be very powerful pieces on the board. Click HERE to play through the game.

chessgameknight

The King and I

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I’ve been looking at some of my games played a few years ago and just to post a game to go with these two games from chessgames, I’ve decided on this game HERE – for no particular reason. You can play through the game on the link. I played black.

chessendN

End position of my game

chessking-1

One of my very old games, played in 2006- I was black and you can see my rating – not that I was really bothered to improve my rating, time to really think about moves, doesn’t exist in my life of full time teaching. [hehe] I liked how I was chasing my fellow countryman around on the board, whilst he was in a really strong position early on in the game.

chessbishopattack

A game played in 2005 – and I like how I used my bishops here. My opponent resigned on this point.

chessking_1

In this game – where I played black – I was lucky. My comments on this game: a very interesting game I’d played in a long time – well, that was in 2006. I like the checkmate in this game. 

You can click HERE to play through the game.

In these next two chess games, you can see some bizarre chess openings…with a King… play through the first game on this link  on chessgames.

chessking01

Not that I think I’m the best chess player, but look at THIS GAME  game, not sure what he was trying.

chess-kingo

Have you seen The King and I?

Reykjavik Open 2013

Reykjavik_Open_2013

Reykjavik Open 2013

Reykjavik_Open

Reykjavik_Open_schedule

Schedule

AnishGiri

Anish Giri

IvanCheparinov

Click HERE to play through the chess games of Cheparinov on chessgames.com

Some of the players: David Navara, Anish Giri,  Johan-Sebastian  Christiansen, Svetoslav Mihajlov, Ivan Cheparinov,  Claude Hoegener, Sebastian  Mihajlov, Gawain Jones and Per Isaksson

reykjavikchess

The tournament are held in Harpa, Reykjavik´s spectacular new music hall on the harbour : 19th – 27th February 2013

The City of Reykjavík has sponsored the tournament since its inception in 1964, when Mikhail Tal won it with a record 12½ points out of 13. The tournament was initially held every two years, but has since 2008 taken place every year. It was closed in its early years, but has been an open event since the 1980s. Throughout its history the Reykjavik Open has featured many of the strongest chess players in the world at the time, including Mikhail Tal, Nona Gaprindashvili, David Bronstein, Vasili Smyslov, Bent Larsen, Friðrik Ólafsson, Mark Taimanov, Lev Polugaevsky, Jan Timman, Victor Korchnoi, Samuel Reshevsky, Anthony Miles, Nigel Short, Hikaru Nakamura, Judit Polgar, Magnus Carlsen, Alexander Grischuk, Fabiano Caruana and Hou Yifan.  Official site: reykjavikopen.com

Games can be followed live HERE on livestream or on the Chessbomb site.
Click HERE to view the chess results of the various rounds of the tournament and rankings/pairings on the site of chess-results.com.
Reykjavik_Giri_round1
Round 1 – Anish Giri

Reykjavik_round1_anish_giri

Reykjavik_Navara_round1
Round 1 David Navara 1-0

moves 17-20 – 17. O-O  Bc3   18. Ne7+ Kh8   19. Qd6 Ra6   20. Bxa6 1-0

Reykjavik_round1_Ivan_Cheparinov

Claude Hoegener vs Ivan Cheparinov 0-1 End position

Moves

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. dxc5 Nc6 5. cxd6 Nxe4 6. Nf3 Nxd6 7. h3 e5 8. Na3 f6 9. Nc4 Be6 10. Nxd6+ Bxd6 11. Be3 O-O 12. Qa4 Kh8 13. Rd1 Qe7 14. Bc4 Bd7 15. Qc2 e4 16. Qd2 exf3 17. gxf3 Bb8 18. Qxd7 Qxd7 19. Rxd7 Ne5 20. Be6 Nxd7 21. Bxd7 Bc7 22. O-O Rad8 23. Bf5 Bb6 24. Bc1 g6 25. Be4 Rd7 26. c4 Re8 27. b4 f5 28. c5 fxe4 29. cxb6 axb6 30. Be3 exf3 31. Bxb6 Re6 32. Bc5 Ra6 33. Re1 Rxa2 34. Re3 Rd1+ 35. Kh2 Rxf2+ 36. Kg3 Re2 37. Rxf3 Kg8 38. h4 h5 39. Rc3 Re4 0-1

Reykjavik_Cheparinov

Moves  – Cheparinov 1 – Wang 0 – Round 2

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. h3 Be6 9. Qf3 Nbd7 10. g4 Nb6 11. O-O-O Rc8 12. Nc5 O-O 13. g5 Nfd7 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. Qg4 Kh8 16. g6 Rf4 17. Bxf4 exf4 18. Qxe6 Ne5 19. gxh7 Qc7 20. Rg1 Rf8 21. Bc4 Kxh7 22. Bb3 Qd7 23. h4 Qxe6 24. Bxe6 Rf6 25. Bf5+ g6 26. Rxg6 Nxg6 27. h5 Kg7 28. hxg6 Rf8 29. Ne2 Rh8 30. Rg1 Nc4 31. Nd4 f3 32. Ne6+ Kg8 33. b3 Ne5 34. g7 Rh5 35. Kd1 Bh4 36. Nf4 Rg5 37. Rxg5 Bxg5 38. Nh5 Bh6 39. Be6+ Nf7 40. c4 b6 41. Kc2 a5 42. Kd3 Bg5 43. e5 dxe5 44. Ke4 Bh6 45. Kf5 Bxg7 46. Nxg7 Kxg7 47. Bxf7 Kxf7 48. Kxe5 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_

Round 3 – Cheparinov vs Huang position after move 24

Moves up to move 24
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. b3 Bg7 4. Bb2 O-O 5. g3 d6 6. d4 e5 7. dxe5 Nfd7 8. Nc3 dxe5 9. Qc2 Nc6 10. Rd1 Re8 11. Nd5 Nc5 12. b4 Bf5 13. Qc1 Na4 14. Ba1 Nd4 15. Ne3 Be4 16. Bg2 Qe7 17. Kf1 Rad8 18. c5 a5 19. bxa5 Nxc5 20. Ne1 Bh6 21. Bc3 Bxg2+ 22. N1xg2 Ne4 23. Be1 Qe6 24. Qb1 Nd6 *

Reykjavik_Navara

Navara vs Ris – Round 4 Endposition    1-0 

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. e4 Bg4 8. Bb5+ c6 9. Ng5 O-O 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 Na6 12. Qh3 h6 13. Nf3 Qd7 14. Qh4 g5 15. Bxg5 hxg5 16. Nxg5 Rfd8 17. Qh5 e5 18. O-O f6 19. Qh7+ Kf8 20. f4 exd4 21. f5 fxg5 22. f6 Bh8 23. Qxh8+ Kf7 24. Qg7+ Ke6 25. f7 Kd6 26. Nxd4 Kc7 27. Qe5+ Qd6 28. Ne6+ 1-0

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round4

Cheparinov Round 4 Endposition 1/2

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O exd4 8. Nxd4 Re8 9. f3 c6 10. Kh1 Nbd7 11. Bf4 Ne5 12. Qd2 a5 13. b3 Nfd7 14. Bg5 f6 15. Bh6 Bxh6 16. Qxh6 Nc5 17. Rad1 Nf7 18. Qd2 Bd7 19. Rfe1 Qb6 20. Nc2 f5 21. Qd4 Qd8 22. exf5 Bxf5 23. Ne3 Bd7 24. Bf1 Ne6 25. Qd2 Nc5 26. g3 Qf6 27. Bg2 Qg7 28. f4 Re7 29. g4 Rae8 30. g5 h6 31. h4 hxg5 32. hxg5 Qh8+ 33. Kg1 Qh4 34. Qf2 Qxf2+ 35. Kxf2 Bf5 36. Bf1 Bd7 37. Nc2 Kg7 38. Rxe7 Rxe7 39. Re1 Rxe1 40. Nxe1 Bf5 41. Ke3 Nd8 42. Nf3 Nde6 43. Nh4 Bg4 44. Bg2 Kf7 45. Ne4 Nxe4 46. Bxe4 Bh5 47. a3 Nc5 48. Bc2 b6 49. f5 gxf5 50. Nxf5 Kg6 51. b4 axb4 52. axb4 Kxg5 53. bxc5 dxc5 54. Nd6 Kf6 55. Ba4 Ke5 56. Nc8 ½-½
Standings after 4 rounds: top ten positions

1 GM Yu Yangyi CHN 2688 4.0
2 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 2678 4.0
3 GM Gajewski Grzegorz POL 2644 4.0
4 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime FRA 2715 4.0
5 GM Cheparinov Ivan BUL 2709 3.5
6 GM So Wesley PHI 2684 3.5
7 GM Giri Anish NED 2722 3.5
8 GM Socko Bartosz POL 2643 3.5
9 GM Baklan Vladimir UKR 2609 3.5
10 GM Jones Gawain ENG 2637 3.5

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round5

Round 5 -Cheparinov 1 Kristiansson 0

Round 5 – moves Cheparinov vs Kristiansson

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. d4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 a6 6. Bxd7+ Bxd7 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 Rc8 9. Nc3 e5 10. Qd3 Qa5 11. Nd2 Be6 12. Nf1 g5 13. Bg3 Nf6 14. Ne3 Be7 15. O-O Qc5 16. Rfd1 b5 17. a4 h5 18. f3 b4 19. Ne2 g4 20. Bf2 Qc6 21. c3 Rg8 22. Kh1 h4 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. exd5 Qc4 25. Qxc4 Rxc4 26. b3 Rc8 27. c4 h3 28. Ng3 hxg2+ 29. Kxg2 Kd7 30. a5 gxf3+ 31. Kxf3 Ng4 32. Bg1 f5 33. Ra4 Rb8 34. Rf1 Nh6 35. Ba7 Ra8 36. Bb6 f4 37. Ne4 Nf5 38. Rxb4 Rab8 39. Ra4 Rxb6 40. Nc5+ dxc5 41. axb6 Nd6 42. Rfa1 e4+ 43. Kxf4 Bg5+ 44. Kg4 Bf6+ 45. Kf4 Bxa1 46. Rxa1 Rf8+ 47. Kg4 Kc8 48. Rxa6 Kb7 49. Ra7+ Kxb6 50. Re7 Ka5 51. Re6 Rd8 52. Kf4 Kb4 53. Ke5 Kxb3 54. Rxd6 Rxd6 55. Kxd6 e3 0-1

Reykjavik_standings

Standings after round 5 – Top Ten

Reykjavik_pairings_round6
Pairings Round 6 – top 16 boards

Reykjavik_Cheparinov_round6

Round 6 Cheparinov 0- Eljanov 1 

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 a6 5. a4 e6 6. g3 dxc4 7. Bg2 c5 8. O-O cxd4 9. Nxd4 Be7 10. a5 O-O 11. Nc2 Qc7 12. Be3 Bd7 13. Bb6 Qc8 14. Ne3 Bb5 15. Rc1 Nfd7 16. Na4 Bg5 17. f4 Nxb6 18. Nxb6 Qc5 19. Rf3 Bf6 20. Nxa8 Rd8 21. Qe1 Nc6 22. Nb6 Bd4 23. Kf2 e5 24. b4 Nxb4 25. fxe5 Nc6 26. Qd2 c3 27. Qc2 Nxe5 28. Qf5 g6 29. Qf4 Re8 30. Nd5 Qxd5 31. Kf1 Nxf3 0-1

Reykjavik_open_2013-
Pairings round 7 – 24th February at 13:00

Sommer net


Picture taken in Osterley Park.
Sê nou die afgevalde blare
waai dartellend
en vul heimlik my blootgestelde verlange?

Nikita 29 Sept 2008

Opdatering: 8/3/2013 – Ek lees so pas hierdie gedeelte van Barend Toerien en kon nie glo wat ek lees nie… jy sal verstaan as jy die inskrywing oor hom op my blog lees…toeval?

++++

Barend J. Toerien 

Uit: Momente (herfs)

XV
Sê nou die koue maan
ruk hom los
en tuimel agter die trekganse aan?

chess_victoria-oomPaul

Image: kihm2.wordpress.com

Playing chess with Queen Victoria is Paul Kruger (1825-1904) a.k.a. Uncle Paul (Dutch: “Oom Paul”), President of the South African Republic (Transvaal) and the face of Boer resistance against the British in the Second Boer War (1899–1902). The general looking over Victoria’s shoulder could be Baden-Powell. Sad face, Queen Victoria ‘s – uhm…wonder why…? 

Die Beiteltjie
Ek kry ’n klein klein beiteltjie,
ek tik hom en hy klink;
toe slyp ek en ek slyp hom
totdat hy klink en blink.
Ek sit ’n klippie op ’n rots:
– mens moet jou vergewis:
’n beitel moet kan klip breek
as hy ’n beitel is –
ek slaat hom met my beiteltjie
en dié was sterk genoeg:
daar spring die klippie stukkend
so skoon soos langs ’n voeg:
toe, onder my tien vingers bars
die grys rots middeldeur
en langs my voete voel ek
die sagte aarde skeur,
die donker naat loop deur my land
en kloof hom wortel toe –
só moet ’n beitel slaan
wat beitel is, of hoé?
Dan, met twee goue afgronde
val die planeet aan twee
en oor die kranse, kokend,
verdwyn die vlak groen see
…from the day I see the night
far beyond opening up
within a crack that from my chisel
runs through to the stars
en op die dag sien ek die nag
daar anderkant gaan oop
met ’n bars wat van my beitel af
dwarsdeur die sterre loop
Klik die link vir NP van Wyk Louw huldeblyk-dokument.

Van Wyk Louw – one of the most distinguised Afrikaans poets– I agree with Breyten Breytenbach. ‘The chisel, a metaphor for the poetic word – splits a stone, then the rock under the stone, then the earth beneath the rock, then the poet’s country, then the planet, until… 

…from the day I see the night
far beyond opening up
within a crack that from my chisel
runs through to the stars [Breytenbach]

Lees HIER ‘n breedvoerige verduidelik oor Die Beiteltjie op Oulitnet.

‘n Pragtige gedig – In die dokument verskyn heelwat feite en inligting oor van Wyk Louw. Ek het ook Cecile Cilliers se artikel raakgelees op die internet en kan met haar  en van Wyk Louw saamstem met: ‘n Donker naat loop deur my land. 

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Verward deur die donker naat van ons geweld

2013-02-18 22:52

Cecile Cilliers

Die donker naat loop deur my land / en kloof hom wortel toe – Dít is die eerste twee versreëls van die vierde strofe van N.P. van Wyk Louw se “Die Beiteltjie”, waarskynlik een van die bekendste gedigte in die Afrikaanse letterkunde. Dit word vertel, of miskien het hy dit self in Rondom eie werk vertel, dat die gedig volledig een Kaapse oggend na hom gekom het. Hy was te voet op pad universiteit toe, toe die woorde plotseling in sy kop verskyn. Agter sy lessenaar het hy dit heel en in sy geheel neergeskryf.

Die eenvoud van die gedig ten spyt, laat hy hom nie maklik verklaar nie. Die beiteltjie dui glo op die woord en die mag van taal – meer as wat dit vir die swaard moontlik is, kan dit wêrelde verander. Maar die gevare wat taal inhou, bly nie uit nie.

Daardie versreël, die eerste reël van die rubriek, bly die hele week in my kop dreun: die donker naat loop deur my land…

Ek raak stram om te lag, staan verward, verneder en gedeprimeer deur die donker naat van geweld wat deur my land loop, en wat besig is om gesinne, families, gemeenskappe, uit mekaar te ruk. Is dít wat van ons geword het?

Amalie bel uit Amerika: Mamma, wat gaan aan? Op elke voorblad, The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, USA TODAY, word die gewelddadigheid van Suid-Afrika uitgebasuin.

In 1994 nog die liefling van die wêreld, 20 jaar later opnuut die muishond. Natuurlik is daar ’n yslike hap leedvermaak. Net soos ons leedvermakerig vertel het van die bloeddorstige skietery in die VSA, van die verskrikking van die busverkragting in Indië.

Maar met of sonder die veroordelende woorde van die buitelandse verslaggewers – tot van Fidji het hulle glo gekom – het dit tyd geword dat ons lank en eerlik en ondersoekend na onsself en na ons gemeenskappe kyk. Sonder die gewone skindernuus. Want elkeen het ’n eiertjie te lê, ’n stuiwer in die armbeurs te gooi, of dit nou die dood  an Anene of van Reeva is, ons práát daaroor. Ons praat ja, blý praat, maar wat dóén ons?

Hoeveel sulke berigte, hoeveel sulke stories kan ’n volk se psige verduur voordat dit gewoon aan die werklikheid onttrek? Of erger nog, mettertyd alles gewoond word, hoe grusaam ook al? Is ons dan nie bereid om verantwoordelikheid vir ons land te aanvaar nie?

Tydens die apartheidsjare is daar groepe gevorm – Vroue vir Vrede, Kontak, Black Sash, Vroue vir Geregtigheid – wat daadwerklik vir ’n nuwe, beter Suid-Afrika gewerk het. Moet dit nie maar weer gebeur nie? Kán dit weer gebeur?

Soms vrees ek geweld het in ons bloed kom sit, eie geword aan ons mense en ons land. En dit kloof hom wortel toe.

In die wit nag bid ek saam met Dawid: Laat my weer blydskap en vreugde belewe…

beeld.com/Rubrieke/CecileCilliers/Verward-deur-die-donker-naat-van-ons-geweld-20130218

Hier is ‘n Engelse vertaling deur Uys Krige en Jack
Cope van “Die Beiteltjie.”

         THE LITTLE CHISEL

Here in my hands a small cold-chisel,
I tap it and it rings;
and I hone it and I stone it
until its bright edge sings.

I prop a pebble on a rock;
 –  you’ve got to get this clear:
a chisel that’s a real cold-chisel
can crack a boulder sheer –

I slam it with my chisel edge,
its toughness is a gift:
straight the pebble flies apart
as clean as on a rift:

next, under my ten fingers split,
the granite rock divides,
below my feet I start to feel
the softened earth subside,

and dark the seam runs through my land
and cleaves it to the core –
so a chisel cuts that truly is
a chisel, or what’s it for?

Then with two gold-red chasms
the planet falls in two
and down the rockfalls boiling,
drains the ocean flat and blue

and in the day I see the night
below me open far
with a crack that from my chisel blow
runs to the furthest star


Beautiful South African views

What a beaut!

This poem is about the night mail train that delivered post in Scotland – it left London at night and travelled through all the small towns and villages in Scotland – at night. A service that stopped by Royal Mail a couple of years ago – not very long ago though!
Night Mail by W H Auden

This is the night mail crossing the Border,
Bringing the cheque and the postal order,

Letters for the rich, letters for the poor,
The shop at the corner, the girl next door.

Pulling up Beattock, a steady climb:
The gradient’s against her, but she’s on time.

Past cotton-grass and moorland boulder
Shovelling white steam over her shoulder,

Snorting noisily as she passes
Silent miles of wind-bent grasses.

Birds turn their heads as she approaches,
Stare from bushes at her blank-faced coaches.

Sheep-dogs cannot turn her course;
They slumber on with paws across.

In the farm she passes no one wakes,
But a jug in a bedroom gently shakes.

Dawn freshens, Her climb is done.
Down towards Glasgow she descends,
Towards the steam tugs yelping down a glade of cranes
Towards the fields of apparatus, the furnaces
Set on the dark plain like gigantic chessmen.
All Scotland waits for her:
In dark glens, beside pale-green lochs
Men long for news.

Letters of thanks, letters from banks,
Letters of joy from girl and boy,
Receipted bills and invitations
To inspect new stock or to visit relations,
And applications for situations,
And timid lovers’ declarations,
And gossip, gossip from all the nations,
News circumstantial, news financial,
Letters with holiday snaps to enlarge in,
Letters with faces scrawled on the margin,
Letters from uncles, cousins, and aunts,
Letters to Scotland from the South of France,
Letters of condolence to Highlands and Lowlands
Written on paper of every hue,
The pink, the violet, the white and the blue,
The chatty, the catty, the boring, the adoring,
The cold and official and the heart’s outpouring,
Clever, stupid, short and long,
The typed and the printed and the spelt all wrong.

Thousands are still asleep,
Dreaming of terrifying monsters
Or of friendly tea beside the band in Cranston’s or Crawford’s:

Asleep in working Glasgow, asleep in well-set Edinburgh,
Asleep in granite Aberdeen,
They continue their dreams,
But shall wake soon and hope for letters,
And none will hear the postman’s knock
Without a quickening of the heart,
For who can bear to feel himself forgotten?


If you don’t know about it, you can view plenty of videos on youtube about the Bush War – South Africa vs Angola – a war fought more than 20 years… This is a beautiful Afrikaans song. Visuals are great in the video.
Found this link: warinangola.com


I like this video clip more, as it’s not just still images – like the above video. South African troops can be proud of what they have achieved during the Bush War – they were real heroes.

boemelaar

anzelgerber.wordpress.com/2012/05/03/boemelaar-n-storie-wat-ek-net-moes-oorvertel

Ek het vanoggend weer bewus geraak van ‘n 2007-inskrywing, nadat ek gesien het dat die inskrywing ‘n hele paar ‘besoekers’ gehad het. Dis ‘n gedig wat ek in die vroeë tagtigs geskryf het na aanleiding van ‘n kort verhaal wat in een van die plaaslike tydskrifte gepubliseer was. My prentjie by die inskrywing het ‘verlore’ geraak en met ‘n google-soektog, het ek hierdie verhaal gekry en daar en dan besluit dit moet ook ‘n ‘gedig’ kry. Hier is ‘n nog ‘n gedig by die verhaal wat ek so pas gevind het. Ek hoop jy hou daarvan. Lees eers die verhaal – dis nogal ‘n storie wat jou ‘vang’. Ek het dit geniet.

‘n Vreemde slenter langsaam verby
hare in toutjies en slierte opgerol
moeë plooie, oë op skrefies  teen die skerp sonstrale
stadig krap-krap hy my gedagtegang rond.

Herkenbare momente, oomblikke van draai en wag
opflikkerende name en tasbare gevoelens
met onbeantwoorde sugte – vir later.

Momentum, metaal, glas en splinters
bewegende kreune, die oë van vervloeë
sirenes, histerie, skerper en slegter
oë wat vervaag, verdwyn in die niet
my binneste word stil…

[nikita-18/2/2013]

Battle on Ice

Indeed the name Prokofiev needs little introduction, as one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. However his connection to chess might be a little less obvious, even to the musically enlightened. As to David Oistrakh, he was one of the very greatest violinists, whose virtuosity ranked alongside Fritz Kreisler and Jasha Heifetz. Both of them were passionate chess players, though Prokofiev more than one would believe.
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev, born April 23, 1891, died March 5, 1953 was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor who mastered numerous musical genres and is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century, which include Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Among his best-known works are the 3rd Piano Concerto, the third and fifth symphonies, as well as composed family favourites, such as the ballet Romeo and Juliet – from which “Dance of the Knights” is taken – and Peter and the Wolf. Sergei Prokofiev fell in love with chess at an early age, and during his lifetime never lost his passion for the royal game, befriending chess greats such as Capablanca and Alekhine.The composer met Alekhine in his native Russia in 1900 during an international tournament held there. Alekhine was a member of the organizing committee and Prokofiev had volunteered to accommodate the guests and the players. As the years passed, their friendship solidified. He met Capablanca in January 1914 in Petersburg where the Cuban champion was playing a series of simultaneous games. Prokofiev tried his luck and even managed to win a game!

The game:
[Event “1914 Tournament”]
[Site “St. Petersburg, Russia”]
[Date “1914.05.16”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[Black “Sergei Prokofiev”]
[ECO “D02”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “86”]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 Bf5 4.Qb3 Nc6 5.Qxb7 Na5 6.Qa6 Nxc4
7.Nc3 e6 8.e4 dxe4 9.Bxc4 exf3 10.Qc6+ Nd7 11.g4 Bg6 12.Bg5
Be7 13.Bxe7 Kxe7 14.O-O-O Re8 15.h4 h5 16.gxh5 Bxh5 17.Nb5 Kf8
18.d5 Qf6 19.dxe6 Ne5 20.Qc5+ Kg8 21.exf7+ Bxf7 22.Bxf7+ Qxf7
23.Kb1 Rab8 24.Nxc7 Rbc8 25.Rc1 Re7 26.Qd6 Rexc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7
28.Qe6+ Kh8 29.a3 Qc2+ 30.Ka1 Nd3 31.Rb1 Nxf2 32.h5 Qc6 33.Qf5
Ne4 34.Qxf3 Nd2 35.Qxc6 Rxc6 36.Rd1 Rc2 37.Rg1 Rc5 38.Rg6 Rxh5
39.Ra6 Nb3+ 40.Ka2 Ra5 41.Rxa5 Nxa5 42.b4 g5 43.Kb2 g4 0-1
Another great combination: Chess and music! What’s missing is the poetry! The closest I could get was the poem by Robert Frost.  Please click HERE to read the entire article on Chessbase.

Fire and Ice – Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

You can read my entry on Dance of the knights  on this link. The music is also the theme music to The Apprentice.


A young Sergey Prokofiev with his inseparable board
and chess books. [Image: chessbase]


Prokofiev in his later years remained faithful to his true love [Image: chessbase]

nigel09

 

bond01

Chess: Spy Style – from the movies: James Bond: From Russia with Love

It’s time for chess – again – and this time – from the movies. This game of Boris Spassky, is the game played in the James Bond movie as well.  You can read what Nigel Short said in 2004 about Spassky’s game.

russia
The name is Spassky, Boris Spassky
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d5 4. exd5 Bd6 5. Nc3 Ne7 6. d4 O-O 7. Bd3 Nd7 8. O-O h6 9. Ne4 Nxd5 10. c4 Ne3 11. Bxe3 fxe3 12. c5 Be7 13. Bc2 Re8 14. Qd3 e2 15. Nd6 15Nf8 16. Nxf7 exf1=Q 17. Rxf1 Bf5 18. Qxf5 Qd7 19. Qf4 Bf6 20. N3e5 Qe7 21. Bb3 Bxe5 22. Nxe5 Kh7 23. Qe4 [see an annotation of the game lower down in this entry]

Click HERE to play through the game on Chessgames.com

Nigel Short: [see resource at the end of the text] If chess is a vast jungle – deep, relatively unexplored and slow to yield its myriad secrets – computers are the chainsaws in a giant environmentally insensitive logging company. If our beloved game is not to be reduced to a glorified naughts and crosses – an arid computational desert – then, like a beautiful and intelligent woman, it must retain an element of mystery. If I sound uncharacteristically sentimental, it is probably because my wife and I celebrated our 17th wedding anniversary this week and thus, for once, my thoughts are jolted out of their quotidian rut onto matters of the emotions. A little romance does not come amiss in either chess or love, or so I try to remind myself from time to time. In my opinion perhaps the most romantic of all openings is the King’s Gambit (1. e4 e5 2. f4!). A few years ago I sat in a bar with Vladimir Kramnik discussing theory. At that time the future World Champion was contemplating a switch to King’s Pawn openings and he wanted to bounce his preliminary ideas off me. He opined that the Evans’ Gambit (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4!) was very logical: White sacrifices a fairly unimportant wing pawn to open lines and accelerate his development. This was not necessarily to say that it was Vlad’s preferred method of starting the game, but at least he could understand the rationale behind it. In contrast, the King’s Gambit, however, was for him totally incomprehensible: it loses a pawn and weakens the King-side, for all he could see. Of course Vlad was absolutely right; my scientific deductive side had to agree – the King’s Gambit has had a somewhat dodgy reputation ever since it was first mentioned in Lucena’s manuscript of 1497. And yet my irrational mystical side revolted and still revolts against so cold and sober a judgement. There is something inspiring about voyaging into storm-tossed seas.
Over the years the most successful practitioner of the King’s Gambit has been Boris Spassky. His record of 16 victories and no defeats (with some draws) is unsurpassed. His victims include two of the most illustrious names in chess history – Bobby Fischer and Anatoly Karpov – and his famous brilliancy against Bronstein was used as the opening scene of the Bond movie From Russia with Love.
Click on this link to read the article on the site of the Telegraph.

From Chessbase:

bond02

From Leningrad with Love

The movie Nigel mentions, From Russia with Love, was produced in 1963. One of the villains is Kronsteen, played by Vladek Sheybal, master plotter for the terror organisation SPECTRE. Kronsteen is also a world-class chess player who, when asked if his plan would be successful, replies: “It will be. I’ve anticipated every possible variation of counter move.” And Bond’s colleague, the Turkish operative Kerim Bey, says of him: “These Russians are great chess players. When they wish to execute a plot, they execute it brilliantly. The game is planned minutely, the gambits of the enemy are provided for.”

In the famous chess scene at the beginning of the movie we see Kronsteen playing the Canadian McAdams in an “International Grandmaster Championship”. The score is 11½–11½. The position on the board is the following:

Kronsteen – McAdams, From Russia with Love, 1963

Here Kronsteen gives his opponent a long glare and then plays 1.Nxe5+ (as you can see in the picture above). He ominously says “check” while the move is displayed for the audience on a large demonstration board. McAdams nervously plays 1…Kh7, after which Kronsteen smiles and plays 2.Qe4+.

McAdams is horrified and knocks over his king as a sign of resignation, muttering “Congratulations sir, that was a brilliant coup.” The audience bursts into applause as Kronsteen leaves the room to get on with his evil plottings.

Click HERE to read the article on the site of Chessbase.

This is the game annotated by my chess friend, Dan. [see his message in the message box].

1.e4 e5 2.f4 Prior to Spassky, Bronstein was considered to be the foremost grandmaster practitioner of the King’s Gambit, so Spassky’s move has an air of provocation about it.

exf4 3.Nf3 d5 The Abazzia, or “Modern,” Defence to the gambit. After 45 years, though, should it still be called “modern,” especially since it dates back to at least 1913 (time of the Abazzia Gambit Tournament, from which it gets its alternate name)?

4.exd5 Bd6 A rarely played continuation, the usual line being 4…Nf6.

5.Nc3 This move comes up in several of Spassky’s King’s Gambit games (see his game with Fischer in the same year). It’s like his philosophy is, “when in doubt, play Nc3.” In many lines of this opening, a handy solidifying move for White is Pc3, which the Knight now blocks. More active, it seems to me, is the line (5.Bb5+ Bd76.Bxd7+ Nxd7 7.0-0), which should lead to a considerable advantage for White. White could have also tried 5.d4 followed by 6.c4 with a Pawn phalanx. Both plans seem better than the text.

5. … Ne7 Black plans to put his Queen’s Knight on f6, hence the King’s Knight gets developed on e7.

6.d4 O-O 7.Bd3 Nd7 Heading for f6 …

8.O-O h6 … which he doesn’t play right away because of (8…Nf6 9.Ng5! h610.Nge4) and White has a nice, centralised game (although, due to White’s Pawn minus, the game could be considered equal).

9.Ne4 White might also have tried the manuever 9.Qe1-h4.

Nxd5 10.c4 Ne3 11.Bxe3 fxe3 12.c5 White prefers to gain space rather than prosaically win back his Pawn with 12.Qe2.

Be7 13.Bc2 This looks almost like a beginner’s plan: doubling the Queen and Bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal, move the Knight/e4 out of the way, then mate on h7. Of course, that’s assuming Black does nothing to stop it.

Re8 14.Qd3 e2?! Black is trying to gain time with his useless e-pawn, but the threat on h7 is real. Better would be (14…Nf6 15.Rae1 Be6 16.Rxe3) and White is only marginally better.
15.Nd6!? One of the more spectacular sacrifices in chess history. “The most brilliant sacrifice since the Evergreen Game,” exclaimed one commentator. The question is: is it sound? (15.Qxe2) sould lead to a small advantage for White, and, objectively speaking, may be the better move. Another possibility is 15.Rf2, with the idea of(15.Rf2 Nf8 16.Rxe2) followed by Rae1.

15. … Nf8 (15…exf1=Q+ may transpose to the game if, after 16.Rxf1 Nf8). KK suggests the following: (15…exf1=Q+ 16.Rxf1 Nf6 17.Nxf7!) with advantage. However, I think Black has a better move here with 15 or 16…Bxd6, e.g.,(15…exf1=Q+ 16.Rxf1 Bxd6 17.cxd6 cxd6 18.Qh7+ Kf8 19.Qh8+ Ke7 20.Re1+Ne5 21.Qxg7 Be6 (21…Rg8 22.Qxh6 Qb6+! 23.Kh1 Be6 24.dxe5 d5 25.Qf6+ is unclear) 22.dxe5 dxe5 23.Bb3 Qb6+ 24.Kh1 Rg8 25.Qxe5). I’d take Black for choice.

Chessworld member jim42078, Lord Ptarmigan did the following analysis with the aid of his “Fritz” computer: “I have found what seems to be the best defence for Black(well, my fritz has anyway). The key idea is to maintain the pawn on e2 for as long as possible, e.g., (15…Bxd6 16.Qh7+ this check really just gives White a chance to peer through the fogginess of this position, but is not disadvantageous 16…Kf817.Qh8 probably not best; this is merely for illustrative purposes 17…Ke718.Qxg7 Rg8 19.cxd6+ cxd6 20.Qxh6 and now Black has to take on f1 with check, or else he will find himself lost or level.

20…exf1=Q+ 21.Rxf1 Qb6) and this position differs from the …exf1 before …cxd6 lines because Black has made time to give his King somewhere to run to and has not needed to interpose with the Knight to e5. Black is better off here, although there is work to do.

To counter this, White could play his King’s Rook to e1 or f2 and not sacrifice it. Thus(15…Bxd6 16.Qh7+ Kf8 17.Rfe1 Nxc5! 18.Qh8+ Ke7 19.Rxe2+ Ne6 20.Qxg7 Rg821.Qxh6 c6 22.Rae1 Kd7 23.Ne5+ Bxe5 24.dxe5 Ke8 25.Qf6) seems White’s best on a first, rushed glance, but Black cannot have much to fear here.

Alternatively, White could force the early sac by (15…Bxd6 16.Qh7+ Kf8 17.cxd6when Black has to take on f1 if he wants to claim a refutation 17…exf1=Q+18.Rxf1) and we are back in the main idea Norfolk suggested. This is White’s best.”

Another example of the inexhaustible riches of chess! Admittedly, these complications are almost impossible to wade through over the board, so who can blame Bronstein for losing his way?
16.Nxf7 exf1=Q+ 17.Rxf1 Bf5 This looks like desperation, but Black’s options are limited. If instead (17…Kxf7 18.Ne5+ Kg8 (18…Ke6 19.Bb3+ Qd5 20.Qf5 mate) 19.Qh7+! Nxh7 20.Bb3+ Qd5 21.Bxd5+ Be6 22.Bxe6+ Kh8 23.Ng6 mate). Black’s best bet may be to try to block the key diagonal with 17…Qd5, e.g.,(17…Qd5 18.Bb3Qxb3 19.Qxb3 Be6 20.Nxh6+ gxh6 21.Qxb7). White is better, but Black can fight on for awhile.

18.Qxf5 Qd7 Otherwise he loses at least the Queen. Maybe White will swap Queens?

19.Qf4 No such luck. White has a marked advantage now.

Bf6 Trying to cut off the Knight from the Queen’s protection.

20.N3e5 Qe7 Another try is (20…Bxe5 21.Nxe5 Rxe5 22.dxe5 Re8 23.Qe4) with advantage for White.

21.Bb3 Threatening a deadly discovered check.

Bxe5 This leads to a quick end, but (21…Ne6 22.Nxh6+ gxh6 23.Qxf6 Qxf624.Rxf6) also loses, as does (21…Kh7 22.Qf5+ g6 23.Qxf6 Qxf6 24.Rxf6) etc. The position following the text, and the remaining moves of the game, were featured as the game “Kronstein vs. McAdams” in one of the early scenes of the James Bond movie, “From Russia With Love” (although I was informed that the position in the movie was slightly altered). Quite a distinction and honour for an actual grandmaster game of chess!

22.Nxe5+ Kh7 Or (22…Ne6 23.Qe4 Rad8 24.Qg6 Qg5 25.Bxe6+ Rxe626.Qxe6+), winning easily.

23.Qe4+ On (23…g6 24.Rxf8!) wins. Bronstein (and McAdams in the aforementioned movie) resigned.

23. … 1-0


Loved this series and the theme music!


Sweet memories.


Steve and Nadine – Lied van my hart.

When I read this article I realised how hard, we as teachers, try to instill this advice in the children we teach, in particular 1-4, which Anton Chekhov gave his brother, Nikolai. In our society of today, little is done, from home, to ensure children mature in a way that they will be proper grown-ups, to understand the world we live in and to be accepted in the world we live in. Have you what it takes to be a ‘cultured‘ person? A colleague and I had a ‘conversation’ about nr 4. I said to him that if you work with someone and the person is a liar, you can not trust and have respect for the person the same time… you decide if you want to put nr 4 in position 1 – like me. Honesty is definitely taking position nr 1 in everything I believe. 

“In order to feel comfortable among educated people, to be at home and happy with them, one must be cultured to a certain extent.”

What does it mean to be “cultured”? Is it about being a good reader, or knowing how to talk about books you haven’t read, or having a general disposition of intellectual elegance? That’s precisely the question beloved Russian author Anton Chekhov, born 29th January 1860, considers in a letter to his older brother Nikolai, an artist. The missive, written when Anton was 26 and Nikolai 28 and found in Letters of Anton Chekhov to his Family and Friends (public domainpublic library), dispenses a hearty dose of tough love and outlines the eight qualities of cultured people — including honestyaltruism, and good habits:

MOSCOW, 1886.

… You have often complained to me that people “don’t understand you”! Goethe and Newton did not complain of that…. Only Christ complained of it, but He was speaking of His doctrine and not of Himself…. People understand you perfectly well. And if you do not understand yourself, it is not their fault.

I assure you as a brother and as a friend I understand you and feel for you with all my heart. I know your good qualities as I know my five fingers; I value and deeply respect them. If you like, to prove that I understand you, I can enumerate those qualities. I think you are kind to the point of softness, magnanimous, unselfish, ready to share your last farthing; you have no envy nor hatred; you are simple-hearted, you pity men and beasts; you are trustful, without spite or guile, and do not remember evil…. You have a gift from above such as other people have not: you have talent. This talent places you above millions of men, for on earth only one out of two millions is an artist. Your talent sets you apart: if you were a toad or a tarantula, even then, people would respect you, for to talent all things are forgiven.

You have only one failing, and the falseness of your position, and your unhappiness and your catarrh of the bowels are all due to it. That is your utter lack of culture. Forgive me, please, but veritas magis amicitiae…. You see, life has its conditions. In order to feel comfortable among educated people, to be at home and happy with them, one must be cultured to a certain extent. Talent has brought you into such a circle, you belong to it, but … you are drawn away from it, and you vacillate between cultured people and the lodgers vis-a-vis.

Cultured people must, in my opinion, satisfy the following conditions:

  1. They respect human personality, and therefore they are always kind, gentle, polite, and ready to give in to others. They do not make a row because of a hammer or a lost piece of india-rubber; if they live with anyone they do not regard it as a favour and, going away, they do not say “nobody can live with you.” They forgive noise and cold and dried-up meat and witticisms and the presence of strangers in their homes.
  2. They have sympathy not for beggars and cats alone. Their heart aches for what the eye does not see…. They sit up at night in order to help P…., to pay for brothers at the University, and to buy clothes for their mother.
  3. They respect the property of others, and therefor pay their debts.
  4. They are sincere, and dread lying like fire. They don’t lie even in small things. A lie is insulting to the listener and puts him in a lower position in the eyes of the speaker. They do not pose, they behave in the street as they do at home, they do not show off before their humbler comrades. They are not given to babbling and forcing their uninvited confidences on others. Out of respect for other people’s ears they more often keep silent than talk.
  5. They do not disparage themselves to rouse compassion. They do not play on the strings of other people’s hearts so that they may sigh and make much of them. They do not say “I am misunderstood,” or “I have become second-rate,” because all this is striving after cheap effect, is vulgar, stale, false….
  6. They have no shallow vanity. They do not care for such false diamonds as knowing celebrities, shaking hands with the drunken P., [Translator’s Note: Probably Palmin, a minor poet.] listening to the raptures of a stray spectator in a picture show, being renowned in the taverns…. If they do a pennyworth they do not strut about as though they had done a hundred roubles’ worth, and do not brag of having the entry where others are not admitted…. The truly talented always keep in obscurity among the crowd, as far as possible from advertisement…. Even Krylov has said that an empty barrel echoes more loudly than a full one.
  7. If they have a talent they respect it. They sacrifice to it rest, women, wine, vanity…. They are proud of their talent…. Besides, they are fastidious.
  8. They develop the aesthetic feeling in themselves. They cannot go to sleep in their clothes, see cracks full of bugs on the walls, breathe bad air, walk on a floor that has been spat upon, cook their meals over an oil stove. They seek as far as possible to restrain and ennoble the sexual instinct…. What they want in a woman is not a bed-fellow … They do not ask for the cleverness which shows itself in continual lying. They want especially, if they are artists, freshness, elegance, humanity, the capacity for motherhood…. They do not swill vodka at all hours of the day and night, do not sniff at cupboards, for they are not pigs and know they are not. They drink only when they are free, on occasion…. For they want mens sana in corpore sano[a healthy mind in a healthy body].

And so on. This is what cultured people are like. In order to be cultured and not to stand below the level of your surroundings it is not enough to have read “The Pickwick Papers” and learnt a monologue from “Faust.” …

What is needed is constant work, day and night, constant reading, study, will…. Every hour is precious for it…. Come to us, smash the vodka bottle, lie down and read…. Turgenev, if you like, whom you have not read.You must drop your vanity, you are not a child … you will soon be thirty.It is time! I expect you…. We all expect you.

A. P. Chekhov (left) with Nikolai Chekhov (right), 1882; public domain image via Wikimedia Commons

Source: brainpickings.org

Similar text and more images can be found on this link.

It’s Saturday morning, it’s snowing outside, quite heavily. The snow is settling and I love this music.

Barend_J_Toerien

I have received a PDF document from my sister with the words, ‘…you will be interested to follow up the links in this document and read more, as you like to write as well. I think it runs in the family.’  Well, yes, I like to ‘write’, but where is the time if you haven’t got it? I wish I had all the time in the world! When I read the following paragraph about what AP Brink said about Barend Toerien, I thought by myself, hey, but this is me too! I love mountains and hiking in the mountains – I’ve done several  trips in the Drakensberg and the Wild Coast. I am a qualified librarian teacher, who LOVES libraries and books! Last, but not least, I’ve done some translations… not really something to get excited about, but at least one poem that got published… Barend Toerien grew up in Porterville, the ‘home‘ of my Grandma.  It’s great to know about your relatives and what they have achieved, it makes you feeling better about yourself ….hehehe!! Ok, I am proud of him, to be honest. 

 Please click here to access the PDF, which is in Afrikaans only. This PDF contains a number of news articles from various newspapers about Barend Toerien and MC Toerien. Both were writers/poets. 

Toerien

Barend_Toerien_Steenwerp_se_Bruinmense

Uit: Momente (herfs)

XV

Sê nou die koue maan

ruk hom los

en tuimel agter die trekganse aan?

 

SONY DSC
You will remember THIS entry of a few weeks ago about the snow and winter. Today was again a snowy day and this time, I had my camera with me!! Traffic was quite heavy on the small road I’m travelling, before I get on the main road. I couldn’t resist taking pictures, whilst sitting in the car, before moving on another car length, just to sit again for 5 min-10 min. To be honest, I didn’t mind the wait, as I could just sit – in awe. I couldn’t get enough of the beauty that surrounded me and thought to share it with you today! Enjoy with me these images and I hope you understand now why I got so excited about the views in the other entry. I loooove snow, it’s so white and pure…wishing all people on earth could be so pure.

“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says “Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.”
― Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

SONY DSC

Please click on the images for a larger view.

SONY DSC

Here’s a poem to enjoy! My 5000 words are done… now to hand in my assignment on Monday…hip-hip hurray! One more to go!

Wow, was just reading this entry about De Bono’s patterns of thinking again. Read what he says about creativity! 

Shakespeare… again…my favourite

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind

Act II, Scene 7 from As You Like It by William Shakespeare (1600)
 
Blow, blow, thou winter wind.
Thou art not so unkind
As man’s ingratitude;
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,
Although thy breath be rude.
Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly:
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:
Then, heigh-ho, the holly!
This life is most jolly.
Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,
That dost not bite so nigh
As benefits forgot:
Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp
As friend remember’d not.
Heigh-ho! 

Happy New Year

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To everyone: I would like to wish you a Happy New Year and hope all your dreams will come true during 2013. May you be blessed! You may have recognised my ‘creation’ of last year, which I have now ‘spruced up’ a little bit for this year. If you are a chess player, I hope you enjoy more chess games in the new year! 

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Image:businessinsider.com

When I followed a link on Twitter, I came across this article, which reminded me of a draft I’ve saved a few years ago! By further ‘investigation’, I found this article much more interesting than the start I made on some chess terminology. I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I did. Happy New Year – again!

Here’s a headline that was in USA Today a few days ago: Obama, Boehner continue stalemate on ‘fiscal cliff’.

Anyone who knows chess terminology knows that headline makes no sense.

A “stalemate” happens at the very end of the game, when neither side has a legal move, and so the game is tied. There is no way to “continue” a stalemate.

And the headline writer presumably was not trying to imply that there were literally no more options in the discussion. In fairness, lots of people misuse stalemate.

That being said, chess offers up a wealth of nice terminology that can spice up your writing if you use the terms correctly. Anyone who writes professionally, whether as a journalist or analyst or anything else, could benefit with some knowledge of chess terms.

So as a service, here are a few terms, what they mean, and how they might apply to the news.

Alekhine’s Gun — When your queen and both rooks are all along the same file, they can be incredibly powerful. This orientation is named after the chess master Alexander Alekhine. This is a great term to use to describe any time you have a bunch of heavy hitters all lined up together, focusing on a single target.

 

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E2-E4
 — This is the most common opening move in all of chess, as it involves moving your king pawn out two squares. Bobby Fischer famously called this opening move the “best by test.” When a politician makes the most predictable possible announcement (such as when Obama started the Fiscal Cliff talks by saying he wanted everyone to freeze taxes on incomes sub-$250K) that was the E2-E4 of political moves.Bad Bishop — In chess, you have two bishops that move along diagonals, each of which only occupies one color throughout the whole game. The bishop that starts on a white square can never occupy a black square. In a game where all of your pawns on light squares, your white bishop becomes a “bad bishop” as it becomes hemmed in and impotent. In politics, you see assets misused all the time, as their vantage point makes them particularly ill-suited to bring a certain case. A Wall Street CEO coming out as a spokesperson for later retirement? That’s a bad bishop.

Five-Piece Endgame — A very common endgame scenario in chess involves one side having a king and a rook while the other side has a king, a rook, and a pawn (five pieces total). Usually the side that is a pawn up can win, but not before an extremely drawn out and predictable fight that leaves little room for error. Any scenario where the finale is obvious, but the process of getting there is drawn out might be characterized this way.

Kibbitzer — Kibbitzers are those annoying folk who stand behind you while you play, whispering or even outright commenting on the game in progress. Pretty much everyone on twitter is a kibbitzer.

Knight Fork — Due to the knight’s unusual L-shaped moves, it can be used in clever ways to attack two other pieces at once. Anytime a politician or business attacks two far apart things in one blow, the term applies.

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Wikimedia Commons

White’s pawn on C-7 is on the verge of advancing and becoming a queen.

Queening — A pawn that makes it from its starting point all the way to the other end of the board gets promoted into being a queen. After taking the lead on budget issues, Paul Ryan got queened when Mitt Romney made him his VP selection, essentially making him one of the most powerful people in the GOP.

Simul — When a master demonstrates his skill by playing several simultaneous games at once with amateurs. Any executive who has to multi-task and address several different issues at once could be said to be playing a simul.

Theory — Because there have been so many documented chess games, almost every possible opening sequence has been played several times over. Grandmasters have a huge library of these openings memorized, and can play them rote without much thought. As long as a game is going according to some previously played sequence, it’s all going according to “theory.” Eventually every game deviates, at which point the real game begins.

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Wikimedia Commons

A chess clock. Each side starts with the same amount of time. After each players move, they hit their button, their clock stops, and the other players begins to tick down.

Zeitnot — In competitive chess, the players use a chess clock, which alots each player a certain amount of time to make all of their moves. As the endgame draws near the need for speed causes the players to make worse moves because time is running low. That time pressure is Zeitnot. That could be used to characterize the Plan B fiasco.

Zugzwang — This is a state that occurs usually near the end of a chess match, when it becomes advantageous for the other side to make a move before you do. This might happen if you have a perfectly secure position, but you’ll inevitably weaken your position by moving. When John Boehner is calling on the Senate to move next, you know the fiscal cliff talks are in zugzwang.

Zwischenzug — An “in-between” move. If there’s an obvious play, but the player decides to delay that move for whatever reason, this is a Zwischenzug. Again, Plan B might have been a Zwischenzug.

Bottom line is that chess offers a wealth of cool terms with unique definitions that can spruce up writing. No need to stick to tired terms like stalemate or checkmate.

Read more:businessinsider.com/chess-terms-that-every-journalist-needs-to-know-2012-12

Enjoy this song and listen to the words

Procrastination

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I’m in control, I promise [not] – 5000 words! It’s a lot to write! Happy New Year too! Moving house is also not a joke, whilst 5000 words are waiting. Things are happening against Africa time at the moment – new internet connection can only be established by the end of January. Meantime… mobile internet via a dongle…this is serious now. I’m not a procrastinator…I’ll prove you wrong…someday. Yeah

 

Straatfluitjie

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Picture: ecopreneurist.com

“I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says “Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.”
― Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

This entry is basically meant to be in Afrikaans – only.
What you see in this picture, is what almost hit me in my face about two weeks ago. I was travelling on a road and when driving round a bend, this popped up in my face. Barrels of numbness washed over me, as I watched in awe and admiration, wishing I could sit on a bench and just enjoy the scene for hours without end. Everything was just so… white! I then realised that Winter is also ‘special’.

Winter

Nou lê die aarde nagtelang en week
in die donker stil genade van die reën,
en skemer huise en takke daeliks bleek
deur die wit mistigheid en suising heen.
Dis alles ryk en rustig van die swaar
geheime wasdom wat sy paaie vind
deur warm aarde na elke skeut en blaar,
en ver en naby alles duister bind
in vog en vrugbaarheid en groot verlange;
tot ons ’n helder middag skielik sien
die gras blink, en die jong graan teen die hange,
en weet dat alle rus die lewe dien:
hoe kon ek dink dat somer ryker is
as hierdie groei se stil geheimenis?
-N P van Wyk Louw

Winter is koud. Winter is naar en ongenaakbaar, maar dan is daar ook ‘n misterieuse ‘stilte’ rondom Winter. Winter laat my soms dink aan ‘n gesprek wat jy met jouself het. Winter laat my dink, beplan – of soms herbeplan. Ek dink Winter probeer iets doen, maar is nie seker hoe om dit te doen nie, daarom verkies hy om in ‘stilte’  dinge te doen. Hy bekruip jou en ‘pynig’ jou met sy koue. Winter is soos ‘n ‘boelie’ wat mooi is, so mooi dat jy hom vergewe dat hy jou ‘boelie’. Geniet die Winter – as jy in ‘n land is waar dit nou Winter is! Geniet die sonskyn waar jy nou Somer het! Geniet die liedjie van Johan van der Watt: Straatfluitjie wat so bietjie ‘warmte’ gee met sy pragtige stem.

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Sunday afternoon mood

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Images: Official site of London Classic/Ray Morris-Hill

Players left  to r: Luke McShane, Hikaru Nakamura, Mickey Adams, Vladimir Kramnik, Viswanathan Anand, Malcolm Pein Tournament Director, Magnus Carlsen, Judit Polgar, Levon Aronian and Gawain Jones

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Jason Kouchak – during the Opening Ceremony of the London Classic 2012

Jason Kouchak is a widely-acclaimed concert pianist who plays popular music and jazz as well as classical music. Jason was born in France and studied piano at the Royal College of Music in London, and at Edinburgh University. He has performed in major concert halls in London, Paris, St Petersburg and other venues in Europe and Asia. He has recorded five albums, including his own compositions, and appeared on BBC TV and the Japanese NHK channel. He has made regular guest appearances with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and recorded and performed with Julian Lloyd-Webber. Jason’s tastes and talents underline the long-established link between chess and music. He is a committed and enthusiastic competition chess player, and played in the 2011 London Classic Open and 2009 Gibraltar tournaments as well as in other domestic chess competitions. Visit his site: Jasonkouchak.com 

http://www.londonchessclassic.com/special_events.htm

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Anand Images: raymorris-hill.smugmug

It’s the London Chess Classic – again! It started today and I hope to attend it next Saturday, as my favourite – Anand is playing. The link of the official site is on the side bar – with the logo of the London Classic. Today’s games started with a small opening ceremony. There were a couple of musicians to entertain the group of spectators in the auditorium. Chess is free at the classics for children! On this  LINK you can read my entry about the classics in 2009. You can see my photos of the 2009 event. For the 2011 classics I had tickets, but unfortunately fell ill and couldn’t go. How sad.

This is a ‘cento‘ which I wrote a little while ago, by using Shakespeare lines.  A ‘cento’ is a poem written by using lines or passages of other authors in a new form or order. I used different plays of Shakespeare where he quoted something about the game of chess.

A Game of Chess
Sweet lord, you play me false
For a score of kingdoms you should wrangle
and I would call it fair play
How fares the king?
His hour is almost past

A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!
And I have horse – will follow where the game makes way.
I have his horse!
Give me another horse!
So, the good horse is mine.
My day’s delight is past, my horse is gone.
The rascal hath removed my horse.

Are the knights ready to begin their triumph?
A wandering knight?
I am undone! The knight is here!
Great shouts within all cry ‘the mean knight!’
Great is the humour of this dreadful knight.

I dare thereupon pawn
My life I never held but as a pawn
I have not pawn’d to you my majesty?
I pawn’d thee none!
I’ll send some bishop to entreat
The bishop will be overborne by thee
Wat says my bully rook?

There stands my castle!
His queen, it was his queen!
Queen of queens, how far dost thou excel?
Come hither, come! Come, come, and take a queen
Sir your queen must overboard!
Will take your queen
Farewell sweet queen!

I’ll move the king.
The skipping king, he ambles up and down
This may gall him for some check
No mates for you!
We’ll draw!
My lord, your son drew my master
Where’s the master? Play the men!
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown 

Enjoy a some classical music – Haydn’s symphony nr 101 in D – the clock part 3- one of many favourites and Villar Rides.  Unfortunately, not the whole track, but at least 3/4 of the track.

Another to enjoy

Villa Rides

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Chess Rocks!

Magnus Carlsen playing chess on Pulpit Rock – in Norway
and…I think I can ‘read’ a little bit of the Norwegian language. There’s a tournament next year, Magnus is going to take part in a Super Tournament and then there’s…a school tournament..and a celebrity tournament……

Enjoy the song by a Norwegian singer.

Turneringene

Superturneringen blir stil 7. til 18. mai 2013.

En unik vri planlegges med varierte historiske spillesteder for å trekke maksimal oppmerksomhet fra hele regionen.Stavangerregionen bruker arrangement som virkemiddel for å markedsføre regionen.Det arbeides allerde med mulighet for repeterende turneringer til regionen.

Turneringen vil inneholde:

Superturnering med flest mulig av de topp 10 rankede spillerne
Skoleturnering med hundrevis av barn
Kjendisturnering med et utvalg kjendiser som skal vise sine sjakkferdigheter


Magnus Carlsen plays chess in Mexico – what a beautiful image on the background.

Magnus Carlsen (L) of Norway and Lazaro Bruzon of Cuba compete during the semifinal of chess, in the framework of the Second Great International Chess Festival UNAM 2012, in Mexico City, capital of Mexico, on Nov. 23, 2012. (Xinhua/Rodrigo Oropeza)

Source: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/photo/2012-11/24/c_131996510_5.htm

Unbelievable! I missed all of this! And I saw the tournament was coming up during the Olympics, but so so not me to forget about it! -With all these ‘posh‘ players a few miles away from me! See this link who they are. Here here are the results on the site of Fide. I was fascinated by the piece of art when I saw the image. It’s so beautiful. Some people are just more artistic than other people, so unfair. 

This year, the voting results of the annual contest of the “64” became known later than usual. In the 10 th issue of the reports that the owner of the honorary prize was Magnus Carlsen. The Norwegian was the first chess player, who won the trophy three times in a row. The gap between him and the runner-up -Gelfand was very significant. The remaining places in the top ten was as follows: 3. Aronian 4. Svidler 5. Kramnik 6. Grischuk 7.Ivanchuk 8. Anand 9. Morozevich 10. Nakamura.

Resource: HERE  a Russian Chess website.

Chess Wedding cake of Shahriyar Mammadyarov. See more photos on this link of him and the wedding.