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anand2

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Click HERE for the Official site.

Anand_Carlsen_schedule

Scheduleanand_game1
Game 1
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Game 1: Carlsen vs Anand 1/2

Anand_Magnus_round1

Images: Official site: chennai2013.fide.com

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Moves: game 1
1. Nf3 d
2. g3 g6
3. Bg2 Bg7
4. d4 c6
5. O-O Nf6
6. b3 O-O
7. Bb2 Bf5
8. c4 Nbd7
9. Nc3 dxc4
10. bxc4 Nb6
11. c5 Nc4
12. Bc1 Nd5
13. Qb3 Na5
14. Qa3 Nc4
15. Qb3 Na5
16. Qa3 Nc4
#FWCM2013  #AnandCarlsen

anandcarlsen

The King vs The Crown Prince

Game 1 – Live

Anand_Carlsen_game2

Anand vs Carlsen – Game 2 move 1-7

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Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 8-14

Anand_Carlsen_game2_1Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 15-21

Anand_Carlsen_game2_finalAnand vs Carlsen Game 2 Final position 1/2

Game 2 Live

anandcarlsen-3
Game 3 Photo: Official Site
Game 3: DRAW
Carlsen vs Anand 1/2
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. c4 dxc4 4. Qa4+ Nc6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Nc3 e5 7. Qxc4 Nge7 8. O-O O-O 9. d3 h6 10. Bd2 Nd4 11. Nxd4 exd4 12. Ne4 c6 13. Bb4 Be6 14. Qc1 Bd5 15. a4 b6 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. a5 Rab8 18. Re1 Rfc8 19. axb6 axb6 20. Qf4 Rd8 21. h4 Kh7 22. Nd2 Be5 23. Qg4 h5 24. Qh3 Be6 25. Qh1 c5 26. Ne4 Kg7 27. Ng5 b5 28. e3 dxe3 29. Rxe3 Bd4 30. Re2 c4 31. Nxe6+ fxe6 32. Be4 cxd3 33. Rd2 Qb4 34. Rad1 Bxb2 35. Qf3 Bf6 36. Rxd3 Rxd3 37. Rxd3 Rd8 38. Rxd8 Bxd8 39. Bd3 Qd4 40. Bxb5 Qf6 41. Qb7+ Be7 42. Kg2 g5 43. hxg5 Qxg5 44. Bc4 h4 45. Qc7 hxg3 46. Qxg3 e5 47. Kf3 Qxg3+ 48. fxg3 Bc5 49. Ke4 Bd4 50. Kf5 Bf2 51. Kxe5 Bxg3+ ½-½

anandcarlsen_game3_move29
Game 3 move 29
anandcarlsen_game3
Game 3 final position

game4
Game 4: Anand vs Carlsen 1/2 Draw
Moves
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 ½-½
game4_
Game 4 move 33

game4_-
Game 4 – Final position

Game 5 – Magnus 1 Anand 0

game6move28

Game 6 Anand vs Carlsen – move 28

game6-move32
Game 6 move 32 – I feel Anand could have made a better move with his pawn on d, which he ‘gave’ away.
game6-move33
Game 6 move 33 – game looks like a draw to me – Anand not sure what to do? Bet you they are going to draw this one!
game6-move41
Game 6 still going – move 41

game6-finalmove

Game 6 Final Move – Anand 0 – Magnus 1

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Image: Susan Polgar chess blog – image edited

Anand and Gelfand – image: chessdom

Anand – image: Anastasia Karlovich

It’s again time for the FIDE World Chess Championship – this time Anand vs Gelfand at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Follow the link of the official site to read more.The prize fund is 2.55 million US Dollars. The winner gets $1,530,000 (60%) and the loser $1,020,000 (40%)
Official site: Chess FIDE Moscow

This is the second entry on my blog, on THIS LINK you can follow the first 6 games – with some chess graphics too. Six games have been played. Six draws. Is it Anand’s tactic, is he warming up? What about a prediction: 6 more draws within the next week.

Game 7 – move 8

Game 7 – Anand explained where his ‘mistake’ was – the Bishop on C8!- which he lost

Game 7 moves – [grrr for the Houdine comments in the PGN-file too- I tried to remove it neatly]

Click HERE to play through game 7. The link will open in a new window.

Anand during the interview after Game 7 – explaining his Bishop-mistake +My opinion about move 26: unnecessary lost of his Knight on E4 too.

Game 8 Anand vs Gelfand 1-0

Game 9 – Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2-12

Game 10 Anand vs Gelfand – 1/2-1/2

Game 10 moves

Countdown startinggame 11

Anand – Gelfand – taking their positions

Standings

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – move 16

Anand – game 11

Game 11 – Gelfand

Game 11 – draw agreed

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2 – 1/2

Game 12 – Anand vs Gelfand 1/2-1/2

Standings: Anand 6 – Gelfand 6. Now – for the tie break on Wednesday! Still crossing my fingers for Anand!

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Anand and Gelfand – image: chessdom

Image data: chessbase

It’s again time for the FIDE World Chess Championship – this time Anand vs Gelfand at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Follow the link of the official site to read more.The prize fund is 2.55 million US Dollars. The winner gets $1,530,000 (60%) and the loser $1,020,000 (40%)
Chess FIDE Moscow
Anand vs Gelfand –  Official site here.

The World Chess Championship 2012 is a match between the current world champion Viswanathan Anand of India and Boris Gelfand of Israel, winner of the Candidates tournament. The match started on 10 May and is expected to end on 30 May 2012. It is played in the Engineering Building of the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, Russia and will determine the World Chess Champion. The match is held under the auspices of FIDE, the World Chess Federation. The prize fund is 2.55 million US Dollars.

The defending champion is Anand, having held the title since 2007. He last defended his title by winning the World Chess Championship 2010 against Veselin Topalov. The challenger is Gelfand, who won the tournament of eight-player Candidate Matches.- Wikipedia

Schedule – game 3-12

Image: Tretyakov-Gallery

Tretyakov-Gallery – Image:
http://moscow2012.fide.com/en/venue

The Venue

The State Tretyakov Gallery is the national treasury of the Russian fine art and one of the greatest museums in the world. Founded in 1856 by the Moscovite merchant Pavel Tretyakov, the Gallery was donated to the city of Moscow in 1892. Throughout the years, the Tretyakov Gallery developed into not only an immense museum known around the world, but also an important research center engaged in the preservation, restoration and study of its treasures, as well as raising public awareness of them. Today, the Tretyakov Gallery is home to over 170,000 works of art.

The Tretyakov Gallery Engineering Wing which will host the match is designed for large exhibitions, conferences and other cultural events. Source: chessbase

Anand vs Gelfand 1/2 – game 1

[Event “Anand-Gelfand World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Moscow RUS”]
[Date “2012.05.11”]
[EventDate “2012.05.10”]
[Round “1”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Boris Gelfand”]
[ECO “D85”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Nf3 c5 8.Bb5+ Nc6 9.d5 Qa5 10.Rb1 a6 11.Bxc6+ bxc6 12.O-O Qxa2 13.Rb2 Qa5 14.d6 Ra7 15.Bg5 exd6 16.Qxd6 Rd7 17.Qxc6 Qc7 18.Qxc7 Rxc7 19.Bf4 Rb7 20.Rc2 O-O 21.Bd6 Re8 22.Nd2 f5 23.f3 fxe4 24.Nxe4 Bf5 1/2-1/2

Gelfand vs Anand: Game 2: 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Gelfand Game 3 – 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Gelfand game 3 – photo: Indianews

Gelfand vs Anand – Game 4 – 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Gelfand – Game 5 – 1/2-1/2

Gelfand vs Anand Game 6 – 1/2-1/2

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nf3 a6 6.Qc2 c5 7.cxd5 exd5
8.Be2 Be6 9.O-O Nc6 10.Rd1 cxd4 11.Nxd4 Nxd4 12.Rxd4 Bc5 13.Rd1
Qe7 14.Bf3 O-O 15.Nxd5 Bxd5 16.Bxd5 Nxd5 17.Rxd5 Rac8 18.Bd2 Bxe3 19.Bc3 Bb620.Qf5 Qe6 21.Qf3 f6 22.h4 Qc6 23.h5 Rfd8 24.Rxd8+ Rxd8 25.Qxc6 bxc6 26.Re1 Kf7 27.g4 Bd4 28.Rc1 Bxc3 29.Rxc3 Rd4 1/2-1/2

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Congratulations to Anand!

Aruna Anand wife of Grandmaster Vishy Anand delivered a healthy baby boy this morning. The child and mother are doing fine.  AICF Congratulates Anand & Aruna – source: allindiachessfed.org

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Image:Weg.co.za – Anyone for some chess?

 

Magnus Carlsen: Chess is like physical sport

Magnus Carlsen, the highest-ranking chess player in the world, is in London for a tournament which will choose the player to challenge the reigning world champion, the Indian Viswanathan Anand.

On a rest day in the tournament, Magnus Carlsen spoke to the BBC’s Tim Franks, and outlined the similarities between chess and physical sports.

He said: “I think there are many elements of sport in chess. We prepare very seriously for the games, the main objective is winning, the players prepare physically as well as mentally, and it’s very tough – you get seriously tired playing long games.”

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme on Tuesday 19 March 2013.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-21840944/magnus-carlsen-chess-is-like-physical-sport

https://sports.ndtv.com/chess/videos/why-fitness-is-important-in-chess-250573

Anand stressed it out to be fit when you play chess.

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Please click HERE to play through annotated videos of the games of Anand and Kramnik, 2008. The link will open in a new window. It is also the “movies”-link on my blog..top page.

Images: Official site

The big day has arrived! Opening ceremony on today…Monday 13th October

LIVE CHESS…click on the link on the top right of my blog!
Follow this new link with the games I blog and chess graphics about their games….

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/10/14/anand-vs-kramnik-2008/


14th October – 2nd November 2008….Who is going to be the winner?? The battle for the highest Chess Title! You can find the OFFICIAL LINK on my side-bar in the “Admin”-section as well in the “Chess” section…look out for the same image as the image in top of this post…I will be following the Championships and blog about it too…you can also find a link underneath my “welcome” image…on the side bar of my blog..(right hand side- top – the link will open in a new window)
Please click here to look at statistics between the 2 players on Wiki…the link will open in a new window.
Schedule for the World Chess Championship 2008: 
All games start at 3pm! 2pm UK local time and 9am Eastern USA time.
Game 1                      Tuesday                      October 14 —1/2           
Game 2                      Wednesday                  October 15            
Game 3                      Friday                          October 17            
Game 4                      Saturday                      October 18            

Game 5                      Monday                       October 20            
Game 6                      Tuesday                      October 21             
Game 7                      Thursday                     October 23             
Game 8                      Friday                          October 24             
Game 9                      Sunday                        October 26              
Game 10                    Monday                       October 27            
Game 11                    Wednesday                  October 29             
Game 12                    Friday                          October 31             
Tiebreak                     Sunday                       November 02          

On this link of Chessgames you can play through Kramnik and Anand’s games where they played one another. A new window will open when you click on the link! If you slide down to Anand, you will find more games to play through and at the bottom of this post you will find more links on my blog…- with games to play through- that were all played during tournaments.
 
  • Where: Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany in Bonn  
  • Overall Prize fund: 1,5 Million Euro
  • The match will consist of twelve games, played under classical time controls, in the period from October 14 to October 30, 2008. If there is a tie at the end of these games a tiebreak will be played on November 02, 2008. The prize fund, which will be split equally between the players, is 1,5 million Euro (approximately 2,1 million US Dollars) including taxes and FIDE licensee fees.

  • V. Kramnik and V. Anand. World Chess Championship Tournament Sep. 2007, Mexico City
    Image: Official Site

    Images: Official website…http://www.uep-worldchess.com/
    Short history of the World Chess Championships

    1886 – 1946
    Wilhelm Steinitz (Austria/USA) was the first official World Champion in the chess history. In 1886, he defeated Johannes Hermann Zukertort in the first classical tournament for the World Chess Champion title. They played 20 games against each other – and Steinitz won by 12.5:7.5 points. Steinitz defended his title up to 1894. Emanuel Lasker (Germany) deprived Steinitz of his title and remained champion for 27 years – a unique record in the chess history. The next World Chess Champions were José Raoul Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine and Max Euwe.

    1948 – 1993
    Since 1948, World Chess Federation (FIDE) started to organize the World Chess Championships. After Alekhine´s death in 1946, the new World Champion had to be determined. Thus, there was a tournament with several players where Mikhail Botvinnik (USSR) became a winner. Since that time, the reigning Champion should defend his title in a match against a challenger. Vassily Smyslov, Mikhail Tal, Tigran Petrossian and Boris Spassky – all of USSR – were the next World Champions. In 1972, Bobby Fischer (USA) broke through the dominance of the Soviet players by defeating Boris Spassky in Reykjavik. In 1975 Fischer refused to fight for his title, and as a result his challenger Anatoly Karpov was appointed as new Champion. Karpov – who played two times against Viktor Korchnoi and once against Garry Kasparov – kept his title until November 1985. Then it was Kasparov, who defeated Karpov by 13:11 points and became the new World Champion. 1986, 1987, and 1990 Kasparov succeeded in reserving his chess crown against Karpov, before he broke away from FIDE in 1993.

    1993 – 2006
    In 1993 Kasparov refused to defend his title under the conditions provided by FIDE – and together with his challenger Nigel Short (England) the World Champion decided to leave FIDE by holding the Championship match under the auspices of the new founded “Professional Chess Association” (PCA). Kasparov won the match against Short and retained the title of “Classical World Champion”. Two years later he won the next title match against Viswanathan Anand (India) in the New York World Trade Center. Finally it was Thursday, the 2nd November 2000, when Kasparov’s era ran out: with 8.5:6.5 victory Vladimir Kramnik (Russia) dethroned Kasparov, who did not manage to win a single game. Kramnik, at that time 25 years old, became the 14th Classical World Chess Champion. In October 2004 the next Championship took place: In Brissago (Switzerland) Kramnik held out against the
    attacks of the Hungarian Peter Leko and kept his title. Leko was qualified for this match by having won the Candidates’ tournament in 2002 in Dortmund.

    On the other hand, FIDE continued organizing its own World Chess Championships from 1993 on. The FIDE title holders between 1993 and 2006: Anatoly Karpov (1993), Alexander Khalifman (1999), Viswanathan Anand (2000), Ruslan Ponomariov (2002), Rustam Kasimdzhanov (2004) and Veselin Topalov (2005).

    The split of the chess world into two competitive championships ended in 2006. The duel between the Classical World Chess Champion Vladimir Kramnik and FIDE World Chess Champion Veselin Topalov took place in Elista from 23 September to 13 October 2006. In a historic battle this unification match combined both titles in one FIDE World Chess Championship. Having won this important event, Vladimir Kramnik became an undisputed World Chess Champion. Continue to read more on the Official site here:
    http://www.uep-worldchess.com/


    Image: chessgames.com

    VLADIMIR KRAMNIK
    (born Jun-25-1975) Russia
    Vladimir Kramnik was born in Tuapse, on June 25, 1975. In 1991 he won The World Under 18 Championship, and began a string of international success. At the Manila Olympiad 1992, he achieved a gold medal for best result on reserve board. Major tournament triumphs were soon to follow, such as Dortmund 1995, Tilburg 1997, and Wijk aan Zee 1998. Dortmund became a favorite stop, as Kramnik would go on to win seven more times, either as shared champion, or clear first. In 2000 Kramnik won his first Linares tournament, completing his set of victories in all three of chess’s “triple crown” events: Corus, Linares, and Dortmund. Kramnik would later capture additional Linares victories in 2003 (shared) and 2004.
    In 2000 Kramnik reached the pinnacle by defeating long-time champion Garry Kasparov for the World Championship in London by the score of 8 1/2 to 6 1/2. Kasparov was reported as saying, “He is the hardest player to beat in the world.” The year 2002 saw Kramnik play an eight-game match against the program Deep Fritz (Computer) in Bahrain. The match ended in a 4-4 tie, with Kramnik and the computer each winning two games and drawing four. In 2006 the German organization Universal Event Promotion (UEP) would stage a return match of six games, which Kramnik lost, +0 -2 =4.

    In 2004, Kramnik successfully defended his title by drawing a 14 game match against Hungarian GM Peter Leko in Brissago, Switzerland. His next title defense was in 2006, in a reunification match with the holder of the FIDE world title, Veselin Topalov. As part of his preparation for the match, Kramnik played first board for Russia in the 37th Chess Olympiad (2006), where he won the gold medal for best performance rating of all participants (2847). He also took part in the Dortmund Sparkassen (2006) supertournament, tying for first place with Peter Svidler.

    The $1 million Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match (2006), was played in Elista from September 21 to October 13, and drew record numbers of online followers on most major chess sites. After much controversy surrounding a forfeit in round 5, Kramnik won in the tiebreak phase, thereby becoming the first unified World Chess Champion since the schism of 1993.

    Kramnik lost the unified World Champion title when he finished second to Viswanathan Anand at the Mexico City FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007). Kramnik will exercise his entitlement to a match for the World Championship against Viswanathan Anand in Bonn, Germany, starting 14 October 2008.

    NOTABLE GAMES:
       Kramnik vs Leko, 2004 1-0
       Kasparov vs Kramnik, 1996 0-1
       Leko vs Kramnik, 2004 0-1
       Gelfand vs Kramnik, 1996 0-1
       Kramnik vs Kasparov, 1994 1-0
       Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2000 1-0
       Leko vs Kramnik, 2004 1/2-1/2
       Kramnik vs Anand, 2004 1/2-1/2
       Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2001 1-0
       Kramnik vs Morozevich, 2007 1-0

    WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS:
       Kasparov-Kramnik World Championship Match (2000)
       Kramnik-Leko World Championship Match (2004)
       Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match (2006)

    It is an almost senseless challenge to describe Vladimir Kramnik in only a few lines. His personality has too many facets; his areas of interests are too diverse. What is clear is that Kramnik is not solely fixated on chess. Current affairs interest him just as intensively as numerous sport and cultural activities, several of which he regularly engages in. The cosmopolitan would love to enjoy life ever more intensively, but his drive to succeed holds this inclination within limits. What is it that marks out a world chess champion in him even though he doesn’t focus exclusively on chess?

    People close to Kramnik often claim that this has something to do with his creative nature and strategic gifts. Kramnik considers chess less as a sport and more as the art of carrying out a long-term plan. The harmonious interplay of his pieces and the beauty of his game are already legendary. He is always searching for creative and new solutions, particularly when he is playing.

    In many games, they say, he sees things that no computer can calculate and no other grandmasters could discover. The ingenious ideas would come to him quite easily, providing him with moments of pure joy. The artistic vein in the 32-year-old Muscovite must have been given to him in his cradle. His father Boris is a well-known sculptor; his mother Irina a music teacher. No wonder that journalists all over the world have dubbed Kramnik an “artist” or “painter”.

    Kramnik started to play chess at the age of five. At 12, his enormous talent was recognized in Moscow and encouraged. As a teenager, Kramnik got better and better – at only 16, he won the U18 World Championship. The list of his victories is long. He has already finished all major tournaments in the world as the victor. And he holds a record which made sporting history: Kramnik was unbeaten at the highest level in 86 classical games over 18 months up to July 2000.
    World Championship
    Thursday, November 2, 2000, London: Vladimir Kramnik became the World Chess Champion with a brilliant 8.5-6.5 result against Garry Kasparov (Russia), who could not win a single game. After Garry Kasparov had congratulated him, the greatest dream of his life became true. Exulting, Kramnik threw his arms up into the air in triumph. The audience’s applause and the subsequent tumult will not be forgotten. It was a historic moment in the history of chess: Kramnik had not only won the lion’s share of the two-million dollar prize money; his victory had ended Kasparov’s 15-year-long reign on the chess throne.

    First Challenge
    In 2004, he faced off in another World Championship Match, this time in Switzerland : Kramnik successfully defended his title against the Hungarian super grandmaster Péter Lékó. In a complex strategic battle, he pulled off a supreme coup, winning in the 14th game – the last in the match – with a 7:7 tie. Kramnik was lucky because it was agreed before the match that he had to be beaten outright based on points – the challenger Lékó came heart-wrenchingly close to doing so.

    2005 was a year of ups and downs for the World Champion. Kramnik was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, entered intense medical treatment, and disappeared from the tournament hubbub for six months. The break seemed to rejuvenate the Russian – at his comeback in the 2006 Chess Olympiad in Turin , he had the best individual score of all 1,000 participants. Kramnik was successful in several tournaments thereafter and on 1 January 2008 he again occupied the no. 1 position in the FIDE world ranking list.
      

    The Unification Match

    In October 2006, Kramnik faced the biggest challenge: the unification match that would decide who the next unique, absolute World Champion would be. In a historic fight against all sort of adversities, Kramnik defeated the FIDE champion Veselin Topalov ( Bulgaria ) to become the first unified World Champion after 1993, the one and only official World Chess Champion. His win in Elista was one of the most impressive victories in all of sports history.

    Highlights:

    – World Chess Champion 2000-2007
    – Undefeated in three World Championship Matches
    – Three-time Olympiad winner as a member of the Russian team
    – Russian Honoured Master of Sport
    – Current ELO rating: 2788

    Source: http://www.uep-worldchess.com/

    Please click HERE to play through Kramnik’s games on chessgames.com The link will open in a new window.

    VISWANATHAN ANAND
    All games on these links will open in a new window.
    Please click HERE to play through a ‘Petrov Defence’- game which was played in 2003. This Sicilian game was played in 2001and this Sicilian Najdorf was played in 2003.

    (born Dec-11-1969) India
    Viswanathan Anand, or “Vishy” as he is known to his fans, became in 1984 the youngest Indian to earn the title of IM at the age of fifteen. At the age of sixteen he became the Indian Champion. In 1987, he became the first Indian to win the World Junior Championship. At the age of eighteen, he became India’s first grandmaster. His prowess at quick-play chess earned him the nickname “The Lightning Kid.”
    Anand contested a match with Garry Kasparov for the PCA World Chess Championship in 1995, but lost. Three years later he won a knockout tournament in Groningen to qualify to play for the FIDE title against Anatoli Karpov, but was defeated in rapid tie-breaks.
    a game by them in 1996 with the Reti-opening.

    In 1998, he won the strongest Linares tournament ever, with an average rating of 2752, making it a category 21 event. In 2000, he beat Alexey Shirov to become the FIDE World Chess Champion. He is a four-time winner of the Chess Oscar award and the 2003 FIDE World Rapid Chess Champion. In spring of 2006, following a record-extending fifth victory at Corus Wijk aan Zee (2006), Anand became only the fourth player ever to crack the 2800-Elo mark in FIDE ratings, following Kasparov, Vladimir Kramnik, and Veselin Topalov.
    2007 was a year of two memorable milestones for Anand. First, he finally achieved his longtime goal of becoming world #1 in ratings. After winning his second victory at Linares-Morelia (2007), he overtook Topalov to claim first place on FIDE’s April list. His second great success came at the FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007). Leading throughout the event, Anand captured the unified World Chess Champion title with an undefeated +4 score. A few months later, he won the Morelia-Linares (2008) outright for the third time.
    Anand’s first title defense will be in a match against challenger Vladimir Kramnik in October 2008.
    Please click HERE to play through the games of Anand. The link will open in a new window.
    NOTABLE GAMES:
       Karjakin vs Anand, 2006 0-1
       Anand vs Topalov, 2005 1/2-1/2
       Anand vs Lautier, 1997 1-0
       Anand vs Bologan, 2003 1-0
       Anand vs Kasparov, 1995 1-0
       Anand vs Ponomariov, 2002 1-0
       Radjabov vs Anand, 2002 0-1
       Kramnik vs Anand, 2004 1/2-1/2
       Anand vs Karpov, 1996 1-0
       Anand vs Kramnik, 2005 1-0

    WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS:
       Kasparov-Anand World Championship Match (1995)
       Karpov-Anand World Championship (1998)
       FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2000)
       FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2001)
    WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS:
       Kasparov-Anand World Championship Match (1995)
       Karpov-Anand World Championship (1998)
       FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2000)
       FIDE World Championship Knockout Tournament (2001)
     

     

    Acclaimed as the Fastest Brain in the world, Viswanathan Anand is the World Number one and World Champion. It is his success in the world scene that has made this ancient Indian game, a mass sport in India.The critics rate him as one of the  biggest natural talents ever  in the history of chess. His hallmark lightening speed and intuitive play came to be recognised when he became the first Indian Grandmaster in 1987.

    On 29th September 2007 Anand became World Champion for the second time in his career. By winning the event in Mexico Anand becomes the Undisputed Champion, ending many years of schism in the chess world. An feat that is unique as he achieved it while being the World No.1. A honour shared by a select few. Anand became the first Asian to win the World Championships in 2000. In 2007 Anand  reached the number one spot on the world ranking lists by winning the prestigious Linares tournament. He becomes the seventh person in modern chess history to reach the coveted spot. This is the first for an  Indian and Asian . He won the prestigious Melody Amber, Blind & Rapid chess in Monaco in 2003, 2005, 2004(Rapid), 2006, 2007(Rapid). The Leon Magistral for the seventh time, Corsica Masters five times & the Mainz Classic a staggering ten times. His results in rapid chess make him one , if not the  greatest player  ever in chess history . If his talent as a Rapid chess player is legendary, his records in classical chess have been superlative. In January 2006, he became the only player in chess history to win the Corus Chess event 5 times in the tournament’s 70-year history. He has won the prestigious Corus event 5 times (1989,1998,2003,2004 & 2006),  Linares Super Tournament 3 times (1998 , 2007 and 2008), Dortmund Sparkassen 3 times (1996,2000 & 2004) and other important events like, Madrid Masters,  Biel etc.

    One of the few non-Soviet players in the sport, Viswanathan Anand has been feted with many international awards. He is the proud recipient of the Chess Oscars  given for the best player of the year . He received this award four times. (1997,1998, 2003,2004) (An unique distinction he shares with Bobby Fischer).In India he has received the civilian awards, Padma Vibhushan,Padma Bhushan, the Padmashree and the Arjuna Award. He is the first recipient of the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award. He has received   other prestigious awards from private organisations .

    Having travelled to close to 50 countries, Anand is also fluent in Spanish and German. One of the projects closest to heart is the NIIT Mind Champions Academy which aims at taking chess to over 1 million children from both  Government and Private schools in India . Known as the Gentleman Champion in the chess world, Anand is a spokesperson  for   Vidyasagar, a NGO that crusades for the Inclusion of children with cerebral palsy and  he also represents Avahan, the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation initiative on AIDS. Anand is a keen follower of  current affairs, world business and astronomy. Source: http://www.uep-worldchess.com/

    [Event “Amber Rapid”]
    [Site “Nice FRA”]
    [Date “2008.03.15”]
    [Round “1”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Anand,Viswanathan”]
    [Result “0-1”]
    [EventDate “2008.03.15”]
    [ECO “E15”]
    [MastersGameID “3707810”]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.Bc3 d5 9.Ne5 Nfd7 10.Nxd7 Nxd7 11.Nd2 O-O 12.O-O f5 13.Rc1 Nf6 14.Bb2 Bd6 15.Nf3 Qe7 16.Ne5 Rac8 17.Nd3 Rfd8 18.Re1 Qe8 19.e3 g5 20.Rc2 g4 21.Qc1 Qe7 22.Rd1 Ne4 23.c5 bxc5 24.dxc5 Bb8 25.Ne5 Ng5 26.Qa1 Nf7 27.Nxf7 Kxf7 28.a4 h5 29.b4 h4 30.b5 Bb7 31.Rdc1 Kg6 32.Be5 Bxe5 33.Qxe5 Qf6 34.Qd4 e5 35.Qb4 hxg3 36.hxg3 Rd7 37.Qa5 Rh8 38.Qxa7 f4 39.exf4 exf4 40.gxf4 Rdh7 41.Qb6 Qxf4 42.bxc6 Qf3 43.cxb7+ Kf5 0-1

    [Event “Amber Blindfold”]
    [Site “Nice FRA”]
    [Date “2008.03.16”]
    [Round “2”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Leko,Peter”]
    [Result “1/2-1/2”]
    [EventDate “2008.03.15”]
    [ECO “B10”]
    [MastersGameID “3707801”]

    1.e4 c6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 e5 4.Ngf3 Bd6 5.d4 exd4 6.exd5 cxd5 7.Nxd4 Ne7 8.Bd3 Nbc6 9.N2b3 Ne5 10.O-O O-O 11.Bg5 a6 12.Re1 Nxd3 13.Qxd3 Qc7 14.h3 h6 15.Bd2 Bd7 16.a3 Nc6 17.Nf3 Ne5 18.Nxe5 Bxe5 19.Ba5 b6 20.Bxb6 Bh2+ 21.Kh1 Qxb6 22.Kxh2 Qxf2 23.Qxd5 Qxc2 24.Rac1 Qf5 25.Qxf5 1/2-1/2

    [Event “Corus A”]
    [Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
    [Date “2008.01.26”]
    [Round “12”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Carlsen,Magnus”]
    [Result “0-1”]
    [EventDate “2008.01.12”]
    [ECO “A30”]
    [MastersGameID “3693740”]

    1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 4.g3 b6 5.Bg2 Bb7 6.O-O Be7 7.d4 cxd4 8.Qxd4 d6 9.Rd1 a6 10.Ng5 Bxg2 11.Kxg2 Nc6 12.Qf4 O-O 13.Nce4 Ne8 14.b3 Ra7 15.Bb2 Rd7 16.Rac1 Nc7 17.Nf3 f5 18.Nc3 g5 19.Qd2 g4 20.Ne1 Bg5 21.e3 Rff7 22.Kg1 Ne8 23.Ne2 Nf6 24.Nf4 Qe8 25.Qc3 Rg7 26.b4 Ne4 27.Qb3 Rge7 28.Qa4 Ne5 29.Qxa6 Ra7 30.Qb5 Qxb5 31.cxb5 Rxa2 32.Rc8+ Kf7 33.Nfd3 Bf6 34.Nxe5+ dxe5 35.Rc2 Rea7 36.Kg2 Ng5 37.Rd6 e4 38.Bxf6 Kxf6 39.Kf1 Ra1 40.Ke2 Rb1 41.Rd1 Rxb4 42.Ng2 Rxb5 43.Nf4 Rc5 44.Rb2 b5 45.Kf1 Rac7 46.Rbb1 Rb7 47.Rb4 Rc4 48.Rb2 b4 49.Rdb1 Nf3 50.Kg2 Rd7 51.h3 e5 52.Ne2 Rd2 53.hxg4 fxg4 54.Rxd2 Nxd2 55.Rb2 Nf3 56.Kf1 b3 57.Kg2 Rc2 0-1

    [Event “Corus A”]
    [Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
    [Date “2008.01.23”]
    [Round “10”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Gelfand,Boris”]
    [Result “1/2-1/2”]
    [EventDate “2008.01.12”]
    [ECO “E15”]
    [MastersGameID “3693722”]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.O-O d5 9.Qc2 Nbd7 10.Rd1 O-O 11.a4 c5 12.Na3 Bb7 13.Qb2 Rc8 14.Rac1 Ne4 15.Be1 Bf6 16.b4 Ba8 17.e3 cxd4 18.exd4 dxc4 19.Ne5 Bg5 20.f4 Be7 21.Naxc4 f5 22.Ne3 Rxc1 23.Qxc1 Ndf6 24.Nc6 Qc7 25.b5 Nd5 26.Nxd5 exd5 27.Nxe7+ Qxe7 28.Qb2 Rc8 29.Rc1 Rc4 30.Bf1 Nd6 31.Qa3 Qe4 32.Bf2 Rxc1 33.Qxc1 Nc4 34.Qd1 Bb7 35.Bd3 Qe6 36.Qh5 Nd6 37.Qe2 Qxe2 38.Bxe2 Kf7 39.Be1 Bc8 40.Kf2 Nc4 41.Bb4 g6 42.Ke1 a6 43.bxa6 Bxa6 44.Bc3 Bb7 45.Kf2 Bc6 46.Bd1 Nd6 47.Ke3 Ke6 48.Bb3 1/2-1/2

    [Event “Corus A”]
    [Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
    [Date “2008.01.20”]
    [Round “8”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Polgar,Judit”]
    [Result “1/2-1/2”]
    [EventDate “2008.01.12”]
    [ECO “A15”]
    [MastersGameID “3692699”]

    1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 b6 3.g3 Bb7 4.Bg2 e6 5.O-O Be7 6.Nc3 O-O 7.Re1 d5 8.cxd5 exd5 9.d4 Nbd7 10.Bf4 Ne4 11.Qc2 Bd6 12.Nxe4 dxe4 13.Ng5 Bxf4 14.gxf4 Nf6 15.Nxe4 Bxe4 16.Bxe4 Nxe4 17.Qxe4 Re8 18.Qd3 Qf6 19.e3 Rad8 20.Qc2 Rd5 21.Rad1 g5 22.Qxc7 gxf4 23.exf4 Rxe1+ 24.Rxe1 Rxd4 25.Re3 h5 26.Qe5 Qxe5 27.fxe5 Rd2 28.Rb3 Kg7 29.Kg2 Kg6 30.Ra3 Rxb2 31.Rxa7 b5 32.Kg3 h+ 33.Kf3 b4 34.h3 Rc2 35.Ra4 Rb2 36.Ra7 Rc2 37.Rb7 Rb2 38.Kg2 Rxa2 39.Rxb4 Kf5 40.Rxh4 Kxe5 41.Rg4 Kf5 42.Kg3 Ra3+ 43.f3 Ra1 44.Rf4+ Kg6 45.Rb4 Rg1+ 46.Kf2 Rh1 47.Rg4+ Kf6 48.h4 Ra1 49.Kg2 1/2-1/2

    [Event “Amber Rapid”]
    [Site “Nice FRA”]
    [Date “2008.03.17”]
    [Round “3”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Mamedyarov,Shakhriyar”]
    [Result “0-1”]
    [EventDate “2008.03.15”]
    [ECO “A52”]
    [MastersGameID “3707822”]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.e3 Ngxe5 6.a3 a5 7.f4 Ng6 8.Bd3 Bc5 9.Qh5 d6 10.Nf3 a4 11.Bd2 O-O 12.Ne4 Qe8 13.O-O-O f5 14.Nxc5 dxc5 15.Kb1 Nge7 16.Qh4 h6 17.Bc3 Be6 18.Rhg1 Rd8 19.Ka1 Rxd3 20.Rxd3 Bxc4 21.Bxg7 Kxg7 22.g4 Ng6 23.gxf5 Rxf5 24.Rc3 Bf7 25.Qf2 Qe6 26.b3 axb3 27.Nh4 Rh5 28.Kb2 Qf6 29.Nxg6 Bxg6 30.e4 c4 31.Qd2 Qd4 32.Qxd4+ Nxd4 33.Rcg3 Rxh2+ 34.Kb1 Kf7 35.Rxg6 c3 36.Rg7+ Ke8 37.R7g2 Rxg2 38.Rxg2 Nf3 39.Kc1 Nd2 0-1

    [Event “Amber Blindfold”]
    [Site “Nice FRA”]
    [Date “2008.03.18”]
    [Round “4”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Morozevich,Alexander”]
    [Result “1-0”]
    [EventDate “2008.03.15”]
    [ECO “E51”]
    [MastersGameID “3709268”]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.e3 O-O 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 c6 8.Bd3 b6 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.Qe2 Bb7 11.Bb2 Nc6 12.O-O Na5 13.Nd2 Rc8 14.f3 Re8 15.e4 e5 16.Rae1 exd4 17.cxd4 Nh5 18.g3 g6 19.Qe3 Qd7 20.Qh6 Ng7 21.exd5 f5 22.d6 Bd5 23.g4 Rcd8 24.Re5 Qxd6 25.gxf5 gxf5 26.Qxd6 Rxd6 27.Rxe8+ Nxe8 28.Bxf5 Nc4 29.Nxc4 Bxc4 30.Re1 Ng7 31.Be4 Ne6 32.Kf2 Nxd4 33.Rg1+ Kf7 34.Bxh7 Ne6 35.Ke3 Rd5 36.Bc3 Rb5 37.Bg6+ Ke7 38.Bb4+ Kf6 39.f4 a5 40.Bc3+ Ke7 41.f5 Rb3 42.Kd2 Nc5 43.f6+ Kd6 44.Rg4 Be6 45.f7 Bxf7 46.Bxf7 Rxa3 47.h4 b5 48.h5 b4 49.Bg7 Rh3 50.Bf8+ Kc6 51.Rc4 Rf3 52.Be8+ Kd5 53.Rxc5+ Kd4 54.Be7 Rf2+ 55.Kc1 b3 56.Rxa5 Kc3 57.Rc5+ 1-0

    [Event “Amber Rapid”]
    [Site “Nice FRA”]
    [Date “2008.03.20”]
    [Round “5”]
    [White “Kramnik,Vladimir”]
    [Black “Topalov,Veselin”]
    [Result “1-0”]
    [EventDate “2008.03.15”]
    [ECO “E94”]
    [MastersGameID “3709299”]

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Be2 e5 7.O-O Na6 8.Be3 Ng4 9.Bg5 Qe8 10.Re1 exd4 11.Nd5 d3 12.Bxd3 c6 13.Ne7+ Kh8 14.Nxc8 Rxc8 15.Bf1 Nc5 16.Qxd6 Nxe4 17.Qa3 f5 18.h3 Ne5 19.Bf4 Nd7 20.Qxa7 Bxb2 21.Rab1 Bg7 22.Qxb7 Ndc5 23.Qb6 Rf7 24.Ng5 Rb7 25.Qxb7 Nxb7 26.Rxb7 Kg8 27.c5 h6 28.Bc4+ Kh8 29.Be5 hxg5 30.Bxg7+ Kh7 31.Bf8+ Kh8 32.Be7 Rb8 33.Rxe4 1-0

    Anand’s games

    [Event “XXI Magistral Rapid Final”]
    [Site “Leon ESP”]
    [Date “2008.06.01”]
    [Round “3”]
    [White “Anand,Viswanathan”]
    [Black “Ivanchuk,Vassily”]
    [Result “1/2-1/2”]
    [EventDate “2008.06.01”]
    [ECO “B47”]
    [MastersGameID “3726239”]

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.O-O Nf6 8.Be3 Be7 9.f4 d6 10.Qe1 O-O 11.Qg3 Nxd4 12.Bxd4 b5 13.a3 Bb7 14.Rae1 Rad8 15.Bd3 Rfe8 16.Kh1 Rd7 17.Nd1 g6 18.Bc3 Nh5 19.Qh3 Bf6 20.e5 dxe5 21.fxe5 Bg5 22.Qg4 Qd8 23.Nf2 Bh4 24.Re2 Qg5 25.Qxg5 Bxg5 26.Ne4 Bxe4 27.Rxe4 Rc8 28.g4 Ng7 29.a4 Rd5 30.axb5 axb5 31.Ra1 Be7 32.Ra7 b4 33.Bxb4 Bxb4 34.Rxb4 Rxe5 35.Rbb7 Rf8 36.b4 Ne8 37.Rb8 Nf6 38.Rxf8+ Kxf8 39.b5 Nxg4 40.b6 Nf2+ 41.Kg1 Nxd3 42.b7 Re1+ 43.Kg2 Rb1 44.cxd3 Kg7 45.Kf3 Rb4 46.d4 g5 47.Ke4 Kf6 48.Kd3 h5 49.Kc3 Rb1 50.Kc4 g4 51.Kc5 h4 52.Kc6 Rc1+ 53.Kd6 Rb1 54.Kc6 Rc1+ 55.Kd6 Rb1 56.Kc6 1/2-1/2

    [Event “XXI Magistral Ciudad de Leon”]
    [Site “Leon ESP”]
    [Date “2008.06.01”]
    [EventDate “2008.06.01”]
    [Round “4”]
    [Result “1-0”]
    [White “Vassily Ivanchuk”]
    [Black “Viswanathan Anand”]
    [ECO “E55”]
    [WhiteElo “2740”]
    [BlackElo “2803”]
    [PlyCount “31”]

    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5
    7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4 Nbd7 9. Qe2 cxd4 10. exd4 b6 11. d5 Nc5
    12. Rd1 Qe8 13. Nb5 exd5 14. Nc7 Qe4 15. Rd4 Qg6 16. Nh4 1-0

    On all of these links – on my blog – you will find games of Kramnik or Anand which you can play through — games they played during different tournaments.

    https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/06/27/dortmund-chess-2008/

    https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/09/04/chess-grand-slam-bilbao/

    https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/01/27/anand-polgar-van-wely-ea-in-corus-rounds-12-and-13/

    https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/01/23/corus-rounds-9-and-10/

    https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/01/15/aronian-vs-leko-and-mamedyarov-vs-kramnik-round-3/

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    Please click HERE to play through the games of round 9. The games will open in a new separate window as all other links in this post too.

    All images and info: from the Official site where you can also follow the games live!
    On this link you can follow the the results of all the rounds.
    On THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 1 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 2…and click here for round 3 all rounds’ games on chess.com’s site.

    Topalov…winner of the Final Chess Masters

    Final score…Click on the image for a larger view…source: Chessbase

    Round 10…the final round

    Pairings and results round 10 Saturday 13th September 2008–the final!

    TOPALOV Veselin vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1-0  
    CARLSEN Magnus vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2 
    ARONIAN Levon vs RADJABOV Teimour–0-1

    Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 11

    Carlsen vs Anand round 10 move 22

    Carlsen vs Anand round 10 final position

    Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 11

    Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 21

    Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 32

    Topalov vs Ivanchuk round 10 move 42..move 43: Re6 end position

    Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 11

    Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 22

    Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 33

    Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 move 42

    Aronian vs Radjabov round 10 final position

    Standings after round 9

    round 9

    Pairings and results: round 9 Friday 12th September 2008

    IVANCHUK Vassily vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2
    RADJABOV Teimour vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
    ANAND Viswanathan vs TOPALOV Veselin–1/2

    Bilbao round 9 Anand vs Topalov move 10

    Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 24

    Anand vs Topalov round 9 move 34

    Anand vs Topalov round 9 final position

    Bilbao round 9 Radjabov vs Carlsen move 7

    Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 17

    Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 36

    Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 move 49

    Radjabov vs Carlsen round 9 final position

    Bilbao round 9 Ivanchuk vs Aronian move 11

    Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 24

    Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 42

    Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 move 51, please ignore the 1/2

    Ivanchuk vs Aronian round 9 final position

     

    Standings after round 8 click on image for a larger view

    Pairings and results: round 8 Wednesday 10th September 2008

    IVANCHUK Vassily vs RADJABOV Teimour–1-0  
    ANAND Viswanathan vs ARONIAN Levon –1-0
    TOPALOV Veselin vs CARLSEN Magnus–1-0


    Round 8..Carlsen left…Topalov

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 11

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 16

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 21

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 26

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 34

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 move 42

    Topalov vs Carlsen round 8 end position



    Round 8..Radjabov …Ivanchuk

    Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 6

    Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 13

    Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 20

    Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 move 44

    Ivanchuk vs Radjabov round 8 end position

    Round 8..Anand left…Aronian

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 13

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 20

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 27

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 39

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 49

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 58

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 move 66

    Anand vs Aronian round 8 end position

    Standings as 9 Sept – from the Official site…click on image for a larger view

    Pairings and results: round 7 Tuesday 9th September 2008

    CARLSEN Magnus vs IVANCHUK Vassily –0-1
    ARONIAN Levon vs TOPALOV Veselin–1-0  
    RADJABOV Teimour vs ANAND Viswanathan–1/2

    Please click HERE to play through the games of round 7 and on THIS LINK you can play through the games of round 6.

    Standings…after 6 games…from the Official site..click for larger view

    Pairings and results: round 6 Monday 8th September

    IVANCHUK Vassily vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
    TOPALOV Veselin vs RADJABOV Teimour –1/2
    CARLSEN Magnus vs ARONIAN Levon–1-0


    Round 6

    Pairings and results: round 5: 6th Sept 2008

    IVANCHUK Vassily vs TOPALOV Veselin –1/2
    ANAND Viswanathan vs CARLSEN Magnus –1/2
    RADJABOV Teimour vs ARONIAN Levon–1/2

    Standings after round 4
    Please click HERE to play through the games of round 4.

    Results: round 4 – 5th Sept 2008

    ARONIAN Levon IVANCHUK Vassily –1-0
    CARLSEN Magnus RADJABOV Teimour–1-0
    TOPALOV Veselin ANAND Viswanathan–1-0

    Image: chess.com
    The organisers are certainly making original efforts to make chess more accessible to spectators by placing the players in an “Aquarium” i.e. a giant, soundproofed glass box. This innovation was first seen earlier this year at the M-Tel Tournament, but in Bilbao the “Aquarium” will be situated outside in The Plaza Nueva in Bilbao.


    Round 1

    Round 3…Carlsen vs Topalov..image:chess.com

    Round 5 …6th Sept

    Bilbao will receive from September 2 to September 13, the strongest tournament of the History of the Chess. A tournament of the category XXII with Elo’s average of the participants of 2775,63. Further more, for the first time ever an event of such characteristics will take place in the street, in the Plaza Nueva, right in the centre of Bilbao’s Old Town.
    The six players participating are currently among the world’s top ten chess players headed by world’s champion and number one Viswanathan Anand. Along with him, Magnus Carlsen (number two), Vasili Ivanchuk (number three), Véselin Topálov (number six), Teimur Radyábov (number seven) and Levon Aronián (world’s number ten currently) will compete in Bilbao. No tournament had managed so far to gather such a high Elo’s average level (scoring system to order players’ ranking).

    For the first time in a world’s elite tournament and surrounded by a strong international controversy, the Final Masters is going to apply the football scoring system, earning three points per game won and one point per draw, though players will not be allowed to agree a draw being the competition’s referee who will determine it.

    The Final Masters has the official recognition of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and it will be played in a double round league during ten days (plus a two-day break). The total prize money amounts to €400,000, sum only exceeded by World Chess Championships: €150,000 for the first classified, €70,000 for the second one, €60,000 for the third one, €50,000 for the fourth one, €40,000 for the fifth one and €30,000 for the sixth one.

    Another great novelty in this tournament will be the playing place: the street, allowing a lot of people to follow the games live and directly. A huge soundproofed and air-conditioned glazed case is under construction to this purpose and it will be placed in the Plaza Nueva in Bilbao under a marquee which will also accommodate The Agora for analysis and comments, a space located by the glass case where the audience will also be able to enjoy comments from Chess Grandmasters among whom we can name Boris Spassky and Susan Polgar.

    Pleae click HERE for the Official site.

    Standings after round 3..click on the image for a larger view

    Pairings and results: round 3 — 4th Sept 2008
    RADJABOV Teimour vs IVANCHUK Vassily–1/2
    ARONIAN Levon vs ANAND Viswanathan –1/2
    CARLSEN Magnus vs TOPALOV Veselin–0-1

    Rounds 3-10…Pairings…source:chessbase

    Anand
    I couldn’t care less about my mental power or whatever it is said about me in the chess encyclopaedias in a hundred years time”. Viswanathan Anand is no doubt one of the greatest genius in chess history in the last fifteen centuries. But his easy-going character makes him the complete opposite of Fischer, Kárpov and Kaspárov. World champion and number one at the age of 38, he lives in Collado Mediano (Madrid), the rapid of Madras wants to polish even more his record in Bilbao at a month from the struggle for the crown with Russian Vladímir Krámnik.

    “Although it is my second world title, this one is more valuable because in 2000 chess was suffering from a schism and there were two champions. Now I am the only one. The dream has come true” he explained in Mexico City on 1st October 2007, before calling his parents who live in Chennai (former Madras) and his “Spanish father”, Mauricio Perea.


    Carlsen

    The ‘Mozart of Chess’

    His second places at the Wijk aan Zee Corus (Holland) 2008 and at the Ciudad de Linares 2008, where he repeated his 2007 achievement, are a sign that this 17 years old Norwegian is already mature for even greater achievements. Magnus Carlsen recommends parents of child prodigies: “to give them support but without putting pressure on them. My father taught me to play chess when I was 5, but I wasn’t interested at the time and he left me alone”. At the age of 2 he already solved difficult jigsaws; at 5 he remembered the capitals, flags, areas and inhabitants of every country.

    At 8, Magnus felt jealous one of his sisters played chess and that is where a career only comparable in precociousness with the ones of the sacred manes began. At 13 Carlsen became the youngest chess grandmaster in the world; and today, at the age of 17, he is among the world’s top five players in the rankings. He sleeps up to eleven hours, is a passionate fan of the Real Madrid and Spain is the country he knows best. When he is not travelling he attends a special school for sports talents. He has his particular opinion about money: “I don’t really know what to do with it”. I spend much less than I earn”.


    Ivanchuk
    An adorable absent-minded wise man

    His sensational victory in the Mtel Masters, Sofia 2008 gave him the right to be in the Bilbao Final Masters. But even without this feat, Vassili Ivanchuk deserves a place among the top-class chess players: at almost 40, he is the oldest luminary though he is nevertheless at the peak of his career. Chess lover to the core, tireless worker of encyclopaedic knowledge he is a genius absent-minded wise man of whom everybody – even his most bitter rivals- speaks very fondly.

    “My secret is I don’t know how I managed to win those five first games one after the other. I certainly did have a little bit of what it is called the luck of the champions. But the key is I wasn’t aware of what I was achieving; otherwise I would have never managed to do it. I believe I am at the best of my career. I don’t feel a bit old to stay in the elite; particularly if I compare myself to Víktor Korchnói, who is at his 77 years old still in the front line!”. So modestly explained Ivanchuk his win in Sofia –undefeated, with eight of ten possible points-, one of the best results in chess history.


    Topalov
    An exemplary fighter on his way up

    He defeated Kasparov in what was to be his last game (Linares 2005) and he is a clear symbol of the differences between the current chess elite and the times of the Ogre of Baku.Natural, modest and very friendly, a fighter and well disciplined about his everyday training, and tries to keep a good image. That’s Veselin Topalov, the 33 year-old Bulgarian from Salamanca world chess champion in 2005 and currently number four in the chess rankings, with the clear aim to take up again the crown in 2009.

    “I will never forget what happened to me when I was 8 years old in Ruse, my native city. After defeating me, one of the best players of the area gave me a row, he pulled my ears and almost hit me because I had played too fast, without thinking. A year later I played with him again in the same tournament, and I won, he remembers about his childhood in Bulgaria.

    Topalov admits that it is impossible to be among the world’s top ten chess players without innate talents: “If we put it into round numbers, 60% of my success is due to the effort and 40% to the talent”.

    Radjabov
    The kid that knocked out Kasparov

    Even though chess is along with music and mathematics the activity that more child prodigies produces, very few have impressed so much as Teimur Radyabov. At 12, when he became European Champion U-18, he already showed a strategic depth and good manners not expected from someone of his age. At 14 he became grandmaster. At 15 he defeated Kasparov with the black pieces in Linares. Today he is 21 and has settled among the elite, though everything shows that he’s still got a long way to go, as he will most probably demonstrate in Bilbao.

    One has to go back as far as the legendary Bobby Fischer in the 60’s to find feats as resounding as when Radyabov defeated Kasparov in 2003. Also born in Baku, he had never lost with white pieces to a human rival in the classical game since May 1996. Bearing in mind that both of them were born in Baku and were Guéidar Alíyev’s protégées (President of the Azerbaijan KGB when Kasparov was young and of the Azerbaijani Government when Radyábov was a child) one can better understand Kaspárov’s angry outburst that night: he did not shake hands with the winner and had a very late dinner, thumping his fist on the table while having chicken.

    Aronian

    An easy-going winner

    He could be the boy from the shop around the corner, jet he is a great chess luminary: he is only 25 years old but has already won the World Cup and the Linares and Wijk aan Zee (twice) tournaments. That naturalness, his universal style and belonging to a country where chess is the national passion, as well as a balanced nervous system configure the 25 year-old Armenian Levon Aronian as a very solid value.

    “I’m not prepared to compete with the big ones. The only advantage I have over those beasts is my total ignorance and fresh thinking”, Aronian said at Christmas 2005, a few days after having won the World Cup in Siberia and some days just before his debut in the Wijk aan Zee Corus Tournament (Holland), where he shared the 7th place of 14 participantespants. Just a month later he triumphed in Linares, the chess Wimbledon, so surprisingly as convincingly.

    Images from different rounds from the Official site.

    About.com…classic chess…64 great chess games ever played…follow this link

    http://chess.about.com/library/pal4/zbstches/blzbstix.htm

    LIVE ratings!

    http://chess.liverating.org/



    Round 6

    Image: zeenews.com
    Fifth draw for Anand in Chess Grand Slam
    Bilbao, Sept 09: India’s Viswanathan Anand continued to search for his first win of the Chess Grand Slam Final being staged here, as he played yet another draw in the sixth round.

    The world champion, who is back by Tech giant NIIT, Monday drew with Vassily Ivanchuk in 32 moves and took his total to 2.5 points on the traditional points system.

    But here in Bilbao with draws fetching one point and wins three, Anand has five, while the leader is young Magnus Carlsen with 11 points from three wins and two draws and one loss.

    The Ivanchuk-Anand game was a staid draw coming out from a Slav Defence, with Ivanchuk making a token effort to gain advantage and Anand thwarting this effectively for a 32-move draw.

    Anand’s game has been somewhat subdued leading to the feeling that the world champion is not revealing any of his major preparations that he may have made for the world title match against Vladimir Kramnik next month.

    Veselin Topalov, who beat Anand in the fifth round, and has 10 points with two wins and four draws, follows Carlsen. Lev Aronian, the only player with two losses, is third with six points, and Anand, Teimour Radjabov and Ivanchuk have five points each.

    The tournament is a six-player double round robin event, one of the strongest in the history of the game.

    The scoring system in this tournament is different and experimental. Players get three points for a win, one point for a draw and zero points for losing a game. For rating purposes the traditional 1-½-0 system will be used.

    The prize fund for the event is 400,000 Euros, with the winner receiving 150,000 Euros, the second place 70,000 Euros, and so on, with the sixth player getting 30,000 Euros. The sums are unprecedented for an event like this. Only world championships have exceeded the amount.

    The Topalov-Radjabov clash was more volatile, with the Bulgarian GM looking set to chalk up another victory in Bilbao. But after massive trade-offs after the time control Black had solved all his problems and in fact undertook some tentative attempts to play for a win. The draw came with a repetition at move 73.

    Carlsen continued his great run with a solid win over Aronian. He sacrificed a pawn, which was part of theory, but then young Carlsen played a novelty which involves a second sacrifice on move 15. It loosely resembled the Gelfand-Kramnik game in Mexico City 2007, but that ended in a draw.

    The novelty led to Carlsen forcing Aronian’s king to be stuck in the middle. Carlsen got one pawn back and then launched a blistering attack. He wrapped up the game in 32 moves.

    In the seventh round, Anand will have black pieces against Radjabov, while Carlsen clashes with Ivanchuk and Aronian meets Topalov.

    Scores after six rounds: Carlsen (11 points); 2. Topalov (10 points); Aronian (6 points); Anand, Radjabov and Ivanchuk (5 points each).

    IANS
    Source: http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=467774&sid=SPO&ssid=93


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