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Archive for the ‘South African artists’ Category

Gawie Cronje

An old school – An undiscovered gem: Gawie Cronje, South African landscape artist who lived in the Eastern Cape

I’m a big art lover and have blogged before some of our very best artists like Pierneef and Walter Battis, the creator of Fook Island, Bettie Cilliers-Barnard and Tretchikoff to name only a few. I must admit that until now, Gawie Cronje was really unknown to me. I found today babobski’s blog and was quite surprised to discover this piece of brilliant art.

The Brett Kebble art collection went on auction last week and raised R 54 million. Some artists’ paintings received record prices, which is quite amazing in this economic climate.

Yet, art experts have been saying for at least five years now that South African art is a good investment and should form part of a diversified portfolio.

Many people, when hearing about art and oil paintings tend to think about Van Gogh and Van Rijn. However, there are secondary art markets around the world and South Africa has a flourishing art market as well.

 Kebble’s collection included the big names in South African art. J.H. Pierneef, Alexis Preller, Irma Stern, Nita Spilhaus, Maud Sumner, Vladimir G. Tretchikoff, Jan Volschenk and Pieter Wenning were just some of the names Kebble had collected.

 One of the Irma Stern painting sold for R 5 013 000 at the auction, held in Johannesburg.

 His Pierneef sold for R 267 000 and a Jan Volschenk achieved a world record price of R 668 000.

 Not all of us have the resources of a Brett Kebble so how does one go about collecting art?

What could you buy with R 1 000 000?

 A good JH Pierneef or an Irma Stern if you lucky.

 What could I buy with R 100 000?

 Keep your eyes open for an Adriaan Boshoff or an Errol Boyley.  Boshoff is regarded as the finest South Afirican impressionist artist and a small Boshoff painting will cost around R 30 000 – R 35 000 at least.

Errol Boyely died in 2007 and his paintings are in demand.  The prices of his paintings seem to have settled down but will pick up again once the economy turns.

 What could I buy for R 10 000?

Click on the link for more reading and beautiful art on babobski’s blog.

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moon_1

It was National Poetry Day today in the ukay and I want to share this song by Steve Hofmeyr to celebrate poetry, not just in the ukay, but everywhere. Do listen to the words of this song – beautiful!  Poetry, love and music…touching the strings of my heart.[and of course…chess!]
If you like this song, click
here to listen to more songs from a variety of artists and to read a few love poems in English as well as in Afrikaans.

[Sorry, I’ve removed the song due to another site getting people to download it from my site..that is illegal]
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fook-island-gallooper
Fook Gallooper

Image: artthrob.co.za artist:Norman Catherine

I’m not a big fan of  Walter Battiss, but do like some of his art. He got his inspiration from Picasso – some of his art appeals to me and other…well…appeals to other people…The art in this post is what appeals to me. What I really like about him, is his imagination! He created the fook characters and fook island, a fookian passport, fookian banknotes! His fookian drivers license was accepted in the USA , his colourful fookian passport has stamps from Australia, Britain and Germany and he exchanged a fookian banknote at the airport at Rome…hehe..I think it’s so funny. In these credit crunch days, why not trying your luck! You might just be lucky and your fookian banknotes will be accepted too..good luck!! This second piece of art is a self portrait by Battiss and I quite like the “fook gallooper” – done by another artist. He also created a fookian language, I wish I could see what that is like! Read what Wikipedia says about him in this post. Links in this post will open in a new window.

walter-battiss
Image and read more about Battiss here

battiss-1
Image here: A self portrait by Walter Battiss

walter-battis-zwartkrans
Walter Battiss: Zwartkrans
battiss_market

Walter Battiss: Streetmarket

battis


Somerset East is named after Lord Charles Somerset.[ image]
Read
here about Somerset East and things to do and see.


Walter Wahl Battiss (January 6, 1906 – August 20, 1982) was a South African artist, generally considered the foremost South African abstract painter and known as the creator of the quirky “Fook Island” concept.

Born into English Methodist family in the Karoo town of Somerset East, [South Africa], Battiss first became interested in archaeology and primitive art as a young boy after moving to Koffiefontein in 1917. In 1919 the Battiss family settled in Fauresmith where he completed his education, matriculating in 1923. In 1924 he became a clerk in the Magistrates Court in Rustenburg. His formal art studies started in 1929 at the Witwatersrand Technical College (drawing and painting), followed by the Johannesburg Training College (a Teacher’s Diploma) and etching lessons. Battiss continued his studies while working as a magistrate’s clerk, and finally obtained his Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts at University of South Africa at the age of 35.

Battiss was a founding member of the New Group and was unique in that he had not studied overseas. In 1938 he visited Europe for the first time, and in 1939 he published his first book, “The Amazing Bushman”. His interest in primitive rock art had a very profound impact on his ideas and he regarded San painting as an important art form. He was also influenced by Ndebele beadwork, pre-Islamic cultures and calligraphy.

In a 1949 trip to Europe he befriended Picasso who would have an influence on his already quirky style.

He visited Greece in 1966-1968 and the Seychelles in 1972, which inspired his make-believe Fook Island.

Battiss published nine books, wrote many articles and founded the periodical “De Arte”. He taught Pretoria Boys High School students for 30 years at the Pretoria Art Centre, of which was the principal from 1953-58. He also taught at UNISA where he became Professor of Fine Art in 1964 and retired in 1971. In 1973 he was awarded a D. Litt et Phil (honoris causa) from UNISA.[University of South Africa]

In 1981 he donated all his work to the newly opened “Walter Battiss Museum” in his birthplace of Somerset East.

Walter Battiss died in Port Shepstone, KwaZulu-Natal of a heart attack on 20 August 1982.

Walter Battiss’ long career as an artist has been devoted to the study of man in his environment; first in the context of Africa and rock art, then, later, in the interpretation of this concept in its broadest sense. His versatility and influence as in innovator, and the incentive he has provided for many aspiring artists, have secured him a very special place among leading South African artists.

Walter Battiss was a legendary figure – to such an extent that Professor Neville Dubow of the Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town, once remarked that had Battiss not existed, we would have had to invent him!

Battiss’s weird and wonderful appearance, his colourful and eccentric persona, his insatiable curiosity about life, and his remarkable work ethic, continue to challenge intellectual exploration of his work and capture the imagination of art lovers both at home and abroad.

Fook Island
This “island of the imagination” was a materialisation of Battiss’ philosophy for which he created a map, imaginary people, plants, animals, a history as well as a stamps, currency, passports and driver’s licences. He created a Fookian language with a full alphabet as well. This utopian ‘island’ was a composite of the many islands he visited – which included Zanzibar, the Seychelles, Madagascar, Fiji, Hawaii, Samoa, the Greek Isles and the Comores – blended together in his customary imaginative fashion. In Battiss’s words, “It is something that does not exist. I thought that I would take an island – the island that is inside all of us. I would turn this island into a real thing … I would give it a name”.

Fook was a result of his fertile imagination as well as his opposition to the Conceptualist Art movement of the 1960s and 70’s, in Europe and America. The movement espoused that the construction of art was confined to the ‘moment’ in which it was created. He believed on the contrary that all art exists in the now and this he argued to represent with Fook Island, which was always in the now and always an essential part of reality.

South Africans such as actress Janet Suzman, artist (and Battiss protegé) Norman Catherine, writer Esmé Berman and many others embraced the philosophy of Fook Island. The journalist Jani Allan interviewed Battiss in 1982 and also agreed to his request of becoming a ‘resident’ of the imaginary island.[1]

Battiss’ Fookian Driver’s License was accepted in America and the colourful pages of his Fookian Passport has official stamps from Australia, Britain and Germany. A Fookian banknote was also exchanged at a Rome airport for $10!
Source:
Wikipedia

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Another award for my blog and this time by Little Indian! which I receive with much appreciation, Little Indian! I’ve started recently reading his blog and he’s also  a great cricket fan…and even has a blog with a forum!  I have to nominate 7 other blogs,  but I know Little Indian would be happy with me passing it this time as I’ve just nominated 8 blogs 2 days ago for my other award. Instead, I’m going to let you all listen to an Afrikaans song, it’s beautiful and I love it. I’ve previously blogged a song by Laurika Rauch which I’ve translated for you in English…- called “Suncatcher”…- to understand the words. This time, I want you to listen and follow the English words as it’s such a beautiful song…a little bit of a “blues” song…words of the song by Christopher Torr. With any song you translate (or poem) is not always easy to keep the  rhyming pattern and in this case, it was again a problem, but at least the song makes sense and you can enjoy it! I’ve previously said and I would like to say again…Laurika Rauch is one of our best Afrikaans artists in South Africa. We all love her to bits and she’s just amazing! If you follow the link in this post, you will see the audience’s reaction when she approaches the stage to sing her song with Valliant. Wow! while two other bloggers mentioned stats, I took a look myself this morning and found this number in the total summary…and this is since Nov when I moved my blog from Blogger…thanks to you all as you the visitor, caused this number!


 Image: http://protopopescu.org/dan/Travel/Scotland

DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS

KOOR (1):
SING VIR MY SAGGIES, SING VAN DIE REËN
WAAR KOM DIT VANDAAN, WAAR GAAN DIT HEEN?
MY HART IS AL LANKAL, LANKAL GEBREEK
EK HET JOU BYNA, JOU BYNA VERGEET

1. DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS BESKOU
DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE OGGENDDOU
MY HART IS LANKAL REEDS GEBREEK
EK HET DIT NET-NET WEGGESTEEK

2. DALK IS DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE REËN
DIT SAL DIE AARDE PLEK-PLEK SEËN
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS SÊ JA
VERSPREIDE BUIE HIER EN DAAR

KOOR (1)

3. DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS WIL HOOR
WAAR HET JY EERS JOU HART VERLOOR?
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS SÊ NEE
DAAR’S BAIE VISSE IN DIE SEE

4. MY HART IS AMPER WEER GEBREEK
EK HET DIT NET-NET WEGGESTEEK
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS BESKOU
DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE OGGENDDOU

KOOR (2):
SING VIR MY SAGGIES, SING VAN DIE REËN
WAAR KOM DIT VANDAAN, WAAR GAAN DIT HEEN?
MY HART IS AL LANKAL, LANKAL GEBREEK
EK HET JOU BYNAAM, JOU BYNAAM VERGEET

2X KOOR (1)

…EK HET JOU BYNAAM, JOU BYNAAM VERGEET


Sivertson.com/Images/

English :

..”The people on the bus”

Choir (1)
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

1. The people on the bus regard
Love like the early morning dew
My heart’s already been broken long ago
I have hidden it only just

2. Perhaps the love is like the rain
Blessing the earth just here and there
The people on the bus say yeah
Scattered showers here and there

Choir (1)
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

3. The people on the bus want to hear
Where you’d first lost your heart?
The people on the bus say no
There’s plenty of fish in the sea

4. My heart was nearly broken ‘gain
I have only just hidden it
The people on the bus regard
Love like the early morning dew

Choir (2)
Sing to my softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I have forgotten your nickname

Choir 1:
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I have forgotten your nickname
I have forgotten your nickname


Image: lockhartfineart.com…Rain showers at Monarch Lake

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Danie de Wet

Painting celebrating African and European influences –2008
Danie de Wet
The Way (2005)
Oil on board
Roelof Rossouw
Blaauwklippen Estate from Jamestown
The Red Boat, Hout Bay
Roelof Rossouw
Walter Koch
“untitled”
His inspirations come from African Rock and Graffiti
Francois Krige…Blue Cranes (they are South Africa’s national bird)
I was sent this link earlier this week by a relative of mine. Her hubby is an artist and a very talented person when it comes to art and music and I’ve thought to blog a few artists from this site as I think that we have wonderful artists in South Africa and apart from that, we have such a beautiful country and I personally think that SA is a paradise for any artist. I’d wished many times that I was a natural artist. I want to sit down and start a drawing and after five minutes I want a master piece! But, unfortunately, I was at the end of the line when God handed out that gift! By looking at all these masterpieces then I’m really rubbish when it comes to art! although I’ve done some fabric painting, but that’s easy peasy…it’s like  colouring a picture with  paint! and I’ve done some Chinese painting….that’s painting on plates…even easier than fabric painting! ….nothing really difficult about that and you don’t even have to be an artist to do that! In my school in SA I used to do that with my gr3’s…and they did some wonderful paintings on small plates as a Mothers’ day-gift.  One of my gr3’s even taught her mum how to do it and they started a club at home painting plates as Christmas presents…so, you see, you don’t have to be an artist and I want to be one!! lol! The first two piece of art is from her hubby and the others are just some of the beautiful art which I like…the first one in particular reminded me about chess…if you know what I mean…the bottom half….and I do love any beautiful painting with boats…and it’s even better with a South African mountain on the background!! ….I know I will find more pieces of art which I will like by spending more time on the site…so, here’s the link for you to play around! Please click HERE for more South African artists and their art work.

Enjoy this piece of painted fabric… I might scan one more later…if you have your image transferred on your fabric…it’s….dead easy…almost like “colour-by-the-numbers”….
On THIS SITE you can view a gallery of art from many well-known artists of South African e.g. Maggie Laubscher, Walter Battis, W H Coetzer, etc. Francois Krige’s “Blue Cranes” is from this gallery…do enjoy!

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Image:eso-garden.com

This song is one of my favourites, sung by Laurika Rauch, also one of my favourite South African artists. Laurika is a legend in South Africa and many South Africans love her for her music…and I’m definitely one of them. If you click on the page-link that says…”don’t miss this song”, you can listen to her singing another song together with Valiant Swart…and I’ve translated that song for you to understand the song that’s about a sun catcher… This song is about her as a young girl, where she says she used to believe in Santa ….she saw Santa walking through the corn fields one day and her brother asked if Santa was from Clocolan….then one day  she saw Santa’s suit…and she realised that he wasn’t real…all her dreams were scattered… she also sings about girls having dreams about their future partners and she wrote a letter to Santa …describing him her dream partner…


WOW! This image is from THIS SITE where you can see more fantastic breathtaking images! This is the road to Clocolan…the small town Laurika mentions in her song…in her song her little brother asks her if Santa was from Clocolan…
 

EK HET IN MY KINDERJARE VAS GEGLO IN KERSFEESVADER
IN WERKLIKHEID RY HY MOS MET ‘N SLEE
MAAR HIER STAP HY DEUR DIE MIELIES, MET ‘N STREEPSAK
EN ‘N KIERIE
EN MY BOETIE VRA, “BOER HY BY CLOCOLAN?”
KOOR:
WAAR IS JOU RENDIER EN SILWER SPORE?
WAAR IS ONS DROME VAN GISTERAAND?
VLIEG OOR DIE BOME MET MY DROME
KYK HOE GLINSTER DIE MAAN

DIE WINDE VAN DIE WINTER HET MY KINDERHART ONTNUGTER
EK EN BOETIE KRY ‘N ROOI JAS IN DIE LAAI
JONK VAN JARE, OUD VAN DAE, HUIL EK HARTSEER
IN MY KAMER
WANT DIE FANTASIE HET SOOS ‘N DROOM VERDWYN

KOOR

IN ‘N BRIEF VAN LATER JARE, SKRYF EK “LIEWE KERSFEESVADER
ELKE MEISIE HET ‘N SPESIALE WENS
VIR ‘N MAN SO SOET SOOS SUIKER, MET ‘N MOTOR SONDER DUIKE
EN SOEN HY JOU DINK JY DIS NET ‘N DROOM”

KOOR

EK STAP TOE OP ‘N AAND LAAT, MET ‘N KÊREL UIT DIE VRYSTAAT
AL BESTUUR HY ‘N OU BAKKIE, SÊ EK “KERSFEESVADER, DANKIE!”
WANT AL SY SOENE IS SOOS SUIKER, EN IN SY HANDE ‘N DIAMANT
VLIEG OOR DIE BOME MET MY DROME
KYK HOE GLINSTER DIE MAAN

HIER’S ONS KINDERS OM DIE BOOMPIE, HULLE WAG NOU VIR DIE OOMPIE
MY DOGTERTJIE IS NET ‘N BIETJIE BANG
MAAR HY STAP SOMMER UIT DIE BRANDERS, JA DIE TYE HET VERANDER
MY SEUNTJIE VRA, “WOON HY IN JEFFRIESBAAI?”

KOOR
Read what Wipneus says in her post about “dreams” HERE , but it’s an entry in Afrikaans. The link will open in a new window.

Image:Childrenshospital.org

On THIS LINK you can read about dreams….The link will open in a new window.

From the book “Dreams”…by Olive Schreiner…

 And God laughed at me; and I wondered why he laughed.

God said, “Come, and I will show you Heaven.”

And partly I awoke. It was still and dark; the sound of the carriages had
died in the street; the woman who laughed was gone; and the policeman’s
tread was heard no more. In the dark it seemed as if a great hand lay upon
my heart, and crushed it. I tried to breathe and tossed from side to side;
and then again I fell asleep, and dreamed.

God took me to the edge of that world. It ended. I looked down. The
gulf, it seemed to me, was fathomless, and then I saw two bridges crossing
it that both sloped upwards.

I said to God, “Is there no other way by which men cross it?”

God said, “One; it rises far from here and slopes straight upwards.

I asked God what the bridges’ names were.

God said, “What matter for the names? Call them the Good, the True, the
Beautiful, if you will–you will yet not understand them.”

Please click HERE to read the entire book …”Dreams” online written by a South African writer…Olive Schreiner….the link will open in a new window….and on THIS LINK  you can read more about her…the link will open in a new window.

Image:http://zar.co.za/schreiner.htm
other works of Olive include:


The Story of an African Farm as Ralph Iron, 1883
Dreams, 1890
Dream Life and Real Life, 1893
The Political Situation (with S C Cronwright-Schreiner), 1896
Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland, 1897
An English South African’s View of the Situation, 1899
Women and Labour, 1911
Stories, Dreams and Allegories, 1923
From Man To Man, 1926
Undine, 1928

 

Olive Schreiner rose to international fame as the first major South African writer of fiction, as an eloquent advocate of feminism, socialism, pacifism and free thought, as a trenchant critic of British imperialism and racism. Perhaps best known for her novel ‘The Story of an African Farm’, Schreiner wrote political and social treatises as well as allegories and short stories.

She was born into a poor family of a Boer father and English mother, the ninth of 12 children. She lived a life of incredible hardship: her father was a missionary of implacable religious zeal and her mother aggressively attempted to maintain a European sensibility as the family nomadically wandered from mission to mission throughout the Transvaal. Schreiner was self-educated; her early influences included the philosophers Herbert Spencer and John Stuart Mill, and the naturalist Charles Darwin.”..read on the link I’ve given about her…more…

On THIS LINK you can visit the site of the movie based on her book…”The Story of an African farm”…
The link will open in a new window.

by Gustavus Hindman Miller.
Fireside; 1st Fireside Ed edition, 1985 | 592 pages | PDF | 1.4MB 
Click on the link to download the dictionary of dreams…the link will open in a new window.
the_dictionary_of_dreams_10_000_dreams_interpreted


 
What do you believe about dreams….read this interesting article if you want to dream like an Egyptian! I’ve got a Dutch dream book…more like a dictionary, but quite old…unfortunately packed away in SA…would love to have it so I could blog it..it was always interesting to read what they say if you dream about something, what it means… it has happened to me twice that I dream about people and funerals..then it was when there was really going to be a funeral in the family! The first time it happened was when I was a student…and a couple of days later, my beloved grandma died! After the second time, I really believe that there is some meaning we can attach to dreams!

 

Image: eso-garden.com

DREAMING LIKE AN EGYPTIAN

by Robert Moss

The ancient Egyptians understood that in dreams, our eyes are opened. Their word for dream, rswt, is etymologically connected to the root meaning “to be awake”. It was written with a symbol representing an open eye.

The Egyptians believed that the gods speak to us in dreams. As the Bible story of Joseph and Pharaoh reminds us, they paid close attention to dream messages about the possible future. They practiced dream incubation for guidance and healing at temples and sacred sites. They understood that by recalling and working with dreams, we develop the art of memory, tapping into knowledge that belonged to us before we entered this life journey, and awakening to our connection with other life experiences.

The Egyptians also developed an advanced practice of conscious dream travel.

Trained dreamers operated as seers, remote viewers and telepaths, advising on affairs of state and military strategy and providing a mental communications network between far-flung temples and administrative centers.

They practiced shapeshifting, crossing time and space in the dreambodies of birds and animals.

Through conscious dream travel, ancient Egypt’s “frequent flyers” explored the roads of the afterlife and the multidimensional universe. It was understood that true initiation and transformation takes place in a deeper reality accessible through the dream journey beyond the body.
Please click on
THIS LINK to read the entire article. The link will open in a new window.

 DO BABIES DREAM?

Babies dream, says Dr. Charles P. Pollak, director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital in the New York Times.

In what seems like a rather gutless attempt to explain why he thinks babies dream, Dr. Pollack says, babies sleep because babies experience REM sleep (I have experienced REM sleep, too, any time you put in one of their last five albums). Because infants have REM sleep, Dr. Pollack says, “It is a well-based inference that babies are dreaming in REM sleep.”
Click HERE to read about babies’ dreams…The link will open in a new window.

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I’ve blogged before…ages ago…about Steve Hofmeyr…but now I have one of my favourite videos for you to watch… Beautiful Noise. I do enjoy Neil Diamond’s music and have a few ND CD’s. This song by Steve…was sung during his tour in the USA…in 2007. On this video the word “Afrikaans” is mispronounced and you can see Steve’s reaction…(apart from the other “word” that was used…) Well, no one expect you…if you’re English…or from any other country…to pronounce the word “Afrikaans” correctly…if you do want to know how to pronounce it correctly…it’s easy…just say…Imran Khan…and then you can say..”Afrikhans”…lol! easy as like when you eat a pancake…that’s what I always tell children…hehehe…if you are a South African…you do know too that all is not well with Steve’s marriage…which is very sad for us all ..click on THIS LINK  where you can read about him and his South African actress-wife…Natasha Sutherland’s marriage. I prefer to stick to his music and not to read about him and Natasha..in fact…I haven’t read any news articles about them..not even this one!  The reason why South Africans are so upset about him, is the fact that he is such a fantastic person, he’s got a great personality…he’s a fighter for Afrikaans…and he’s got my support 100% behind him. He’s a fighter for crime…again he’s got my support… he’s a poet/writer and I love poems…and he’s also an actor! I saw him performed in London in the Palladium and his show was just fantastic. Dana Winner is a Belgian artist who performed in South Africa with him .. the Flemish Language is almost like Afrikaans! On one CD she sings Flemish and you wouldn’t notice the difference between the two languages. These albums of Steve are the albums I’ve got…the third album is a Christmas album where Dana sings “Silent Night” in Flemish. Many of Steve’s songs are in English too…

Dana Winner

Dana Winner….Stille Nag-Afrikaans/Flemish–…(Silent Night)
In this video… you see Steve singing Neil Diamond’s song.
 
This next video is a song by Dana Winner… “Ik hou van jou”…in Afrikaans translated…”Ek hou van jou”.

 


Image: on THIS LINK where you can read about her tour in South Africa during March 2008.

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