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Archive for the ‘South Africa’ Category

apartheid_britains_bastard_child

We know apartheid was instilled by the British – the introducing of pass laws, before it was an actual law written in the law books of South Africa. This case study seems to be very interesting. For so many years many countries were shouting ‘apartheid’ – but did they know what was really going on in the country? Did America or Britain look at themselves to see what was actually going on in their own countries, the same time? What is happening in America at the moment? Why is there still so much ‘hate’ between black and white – after all these years? I rest my case. We all know the rules of the (chess) games people and politicians play. They change the rules to suit them only. They instigate events to suit them as and when necessary to avoid checkmate. Just look around the world and you will (probably) notice what they (still) do. This was just one more, but one more too many.

Please click HERE for the first resource link.

Abstracts from the ‘Introduction’ of the book:

“Afrikaners, my people, have long been accused of being the originators and engineers of apartheid, one of the most disreputable institutions in modern history. Yet the accusers have, on the whole, not taken the trouble to understand the historical genesis of apartheid. That is the purpose of this book.

My aim is not to justify apartheid, but to shed light on the historical events and psychological factors which informed its origination. It is not a history, but rather a case study steeped in history.”

————–

“What compelled the Afrikaners, a people traumatised by British barbarism, to inflict the legalised racism of apartheid on their black countrymen? In other words, what does trauma do to a people?

This question constantly ringing in my head would eventually lead me on the most unexpected of paths, and keep me busy for nearly 15 years, something I couldn’t foresee even in my wildest dreams. It led me to the discovery of the abusive relationship between Englishman and Afrikaner, one of unrelenting humiliation of the Afrikaner by the English, since the British arrival in Southern Africa in 1795, and the tragic consequences this relationship had for South Africa, including, inter alia apartheid.”

——

“Fifteen years of research for this book has yielded evidence of at least 200 years of prejudice against Afrikaners. My psychotherapy practice in Cape Town and Swellendam continues to uncover many stories of humiliation. It is important that Afrikaners understand their own history. Otherwise how do you live with the guilt? How do you explain the past to your children – without creating new ghosts and falsehoods? How do you mourn and heal without knowing about the past which has shaped who you are today?

Although this analysis focuses on one group, the Afrikaners, the fact is that trans-generational re-enactment of trauma and humiliation is a universal theme, playing itself out all over the world. A lack of understanding of trans-generational trauma and the impact of humiliation on nations is one reason why ‘people never learn from history’. This book is an attempt to learn from ours.”

Another link:

The myth that there has never been democracy in South Africa is linked to a second myth. Most people think they know that apartheid was an invention of the Afrikaners and their belief that South Africa should be ruled exclusively by whites. Conversely, it is usually thought that the English tradition in South Africa was non-racial and democratic. In fact, the British tradition, as purveyed by both English-speaking South Africans and the parliament at Westminster, has played a less than glorious role in establishing democracy.
Read more on the link of the Independent.

One more…
Link here to read. If you do some in depth research, you will find many more…

An actual fact many of these were a formalisation and extension of existing British pass laws and land acts that kept blacks from travelling freely, obtaining employment, and owning land.

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For English readers: This is a poem by someone who is totally frustrated – and fed-up –  by what is going on in South Africa. Watch this video and you will understand. For us who know why these things are happening, we feel the same and we all know who actually to blame for what is going on in this beautiful country we all love to bits! For those who are disrespectful towards other people and their native language, we do excuse you for being uneducated – as we guess it’s again Apartheid that gets the blame, even after more than 20 years, but we have a clear message: #Afrikaanswilnotfall

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janvanriebeeck
Image: Wikipedia – Painting  of Jan van Riebeeck by: Charles Davidson Bell
Jan_van_Riebeeck
Jan van Riebeeck – image: wikipedia

This is my entry of 6 years ago. I would like to update it with a few images from twitter. As South Africa has so many ‘issues’ over the past few years, some people are looking to put the blame on something or somebody. It’s always first ‘Apartheid’ who’s at fault and next it’s poor Jan van Riebeeck. Well, it’s so much easier if you can blame other people for your mistakes or when you are at fault. I always tell the children I’m teaching: Be a strong, brave person. Don’t blame somebody else. My view: you are a weak person if you blame somebody else. You should take the punch, get over it and move on. Make a difference next time. At least Jan van Riebeeck brought civilization to South Africa. That is making a difference! I love the British take on Jan van Riebeeck in this entry. It’s worth reading it. 

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I thought to share this image from twitter too. Very clever and I imagine Jan van Riebeeck would have loved it.

JanvanRiebeeck_NeilvanVuuren

A cartoon from twitter.

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Van Riebeeck’s statue overlooking Table Mountain.

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This image is interesting. This clearly shows – from the diary of Jan van Riebeeck – that he actually did pay for the land he obtained in the Cape. 

Jan van Riebeeck played a significant role in our history in South Africa. Until 1994, 6th April used to be a Public holiday as it is Founders day. For many Saffas this day will still be ‘Founders day’ and we will commemorate the day, even if it is only in our thoughts. The music video in this entry is Carika Keuzenkamp singing about South Africa. Even though you might not understand the language, you will enjoy the beautiful scenes in SA.
Van Riebeeck was born in Culemborg in the Netherlands as the son of a surgeon. He grew up in Schiedam, where he married 19-year old Maria de la Quellerie on 28 March 1649. (She died in Malacca, now part of Malaysia, on 2 November 1664, at the age of 35). The couple had eight children, most of whom did not survive infancy. Their son Abraham van Riebeeck, born at the Cape, later became Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies.

Joining the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1639, he served in a number of posts, including that of an assistant surgeon in the Batavia in the East Indies. He subsequently visited Japan. His most important position was that of head of the VOC trading post in Tonkin, Vietnam. However, he was called back from this post as it was discovered that he was conducting trade for his own account.

In 1651 he was requested to undertake the command of the initial Dutch settlement in the future South Africa. He landed three ships Drommedaris, Reijger and Goede Hoop at the future Cape Town on 6 April 1652 and fortified the site as a halfway-station for the VOC trade route between the Netherlands and the East Indies. The Walvisch and the Oliphant arrived later, having had 130 burials at sea.
Please click on
THIS LINK to read more on Wikipedia.

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A video to enjoy on a Sunday evening. Have you been to this place? 

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South Africa_Cities
 At random times, I get asked by friends what cities in South Africa are like. They usually want to know if they are ‘big and busy‘ – similar to London. On Instagram, I saw these lovely photos and thought to put together this collage to share on the blog. These pictures are from two accounts: ‘SouthAfrica‘ and ‘CityofPretoria‘. From the Pretoria account, I’ve chosen six pictures as they are all amazing pictures and I couldn’t resist them. If you look at the ‘SouthAfrica‘ account, you will agree with me that there’s only one beautiful country in the world and not just a country with random beautiful places. #SouthAfrica

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Die Beiteltjie
Ek kry ’n klein klein beiteltjie,
ek tik hom en hy klink;
toe slyp ek en ek slyp hom
totdat hy klink en blink.
Ek sit ’n klippie op ’n rots:
– mens moet jou vergewis:
’n beitel moet kan klip breek
as hy ’n beitel is –
ek slaat hom met my beiteltjie
en dié was sterk genoeg:
daar spring die klippie stukkend
so skoon soos langs ’n voeg:
toe, onder my tien vingers bars
die grys rots middeldeur
en langs my voete voel ek
die sagte aarde skeur,
die donker naat loop deur my land
en kloof hom wortel toe –
só moet ’n beitel slaan
wat beitel is, of hoé?
Dan, met twee goue afgronde
val die planeet aan twee
en oor die kranse, kokend,
verdwyn die vlak groen see
…from the day I see the night
far beyond opening up
within a crack that from my chisel
runs through to the stars
en op die dag sien ek die nag
daar anderkant gaan oop
met ’n bars wat van my beitel af
dwarsdeur die sterre loop
Klik die link vir NP van Wyk Louw huldeblyk-dokument.

Van Wyk Louw – one of the most distinguised Afrikaans poets I agree with Breyten Breytenbach. ‘The chisel, a metaphor for the poetic word – splits a stone, then the rock under the stone, then the earth beneath the rock, then the poet’s country, then the planet, until… 

…from the day I see the night
far beyond opening up
within a crack that from my chisel
runs through to the stars [Breytenbach]

Lees HIER ‘n breedvoerige verduidelik oor Die Beiteltjie op Oulitnet.

‘n Pragtige gedig – In die dokument verskyn heelwat feite en inligting oor van Wyk Louw. Ek het ook Cecile Cilliers se artikel raakgelees op die internet en kan met haar  en van Wyk Louw saamstem met: ‘n Donker naat loop deur my land. 

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Verward deur die donker naat van ons geweld

2013-02-18 22:52

Cecile Cilliers

Die donker naat loop deur my land / en kloof hom wortel toe – Dít is die eerste twee versreëls van die vierde strofe van N.P. van Wyk Louw se “Die Beiteltjie”, waarskynlik een van die bekendste gedigte in die Afrikaanse letterkunde. Dit word vertel, of miskien het hy dit self in Rondom eie werk vertel, dat die gedig volledig een Kaapse oggend na hom gekom het. Hy was te voet op pad universiteit toe, toe die woorde plotseling in sy kop verskyn. Agter sy lessenaar het hy dit heel en in sy geheel neergeskryf.

Die eenvoud van die gedig ten spyt, laat hy hom nie maklik verklaar nie. Die beiteltjie dui glo op die woord en die mag van taal – meer as wat dit vir die swaard moontlik is, kan dit wêrelde verander. Maar die gevare wat taal inhou, bly nie uit nie.

Daardie versreël, die eerste reël van die rubriek, bly die hele week in my kop dreun: die donker naat loop deur my land…

Ek raak stram om te lag, staan verward, verneder en gedeprimeer deur die donker naat van geweld wat deur my land loop, en wat besig is om gesinne, families, gemeenskappe, uit mekaar te ruk. Is dít wat van ons geword het?

Amalie bel uit Amerika: Mamma, wat gaan aan? Op elke voorblad, The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, USA TODAY, word die gewelddadigheid van Suid-Afrika uitgebasuin.

In 1994 nog die liefling van die wêreld, 20 jaar later opnuut die muishond. Natuurlik is daar ’n yslike hap leedvermaak. Net soos ons leedvermakerig vertel het van die bloeddorstige skietery in die VSA, van die verskrikking van die busverkragting in Indië.

Maar met of sonder die veroordelende woorde van die buitelandse verslaggewers – tot van Fidji het hulle glo gekom – het dit tyd geword dat ons lank en eerlik en ondersoekend na onsself en na ons gemeenskappe kyk. Sonder die gewone skindernuus. Want elkeen het ’n eiertjie te lê, ’n stuiwer in die armbeurs te gooi, of dit nou die dood  an Anene of van Reeva is, ons práát daaroor. Ons praat ja, blý praat, maar wat dóén ons?

Hoeveel sulke berigte, hoeveel sulke stories kan ’n volk se psige verduur voordat dit gewoon aan die werklikheid onttrek? Of erger nog, mettertyd alles gewoond word, hoe grusaam ook al? Is ons dan nie bereid om verantwoordelikheid vir ons land te aanvaar nie?

Tydens die apartheidsjare is daar groepe gevorm – Vroue vir Vrede, Kontak, Black Sash, Vroue vir Geregtigheid – wat daadwerklik vir ’n nuwe, beter Suid-Afrika gewerk het. Moet dit nie maar weer gebeur nie? Kán dit weer gebeur?

Soms vrees ek geweld het in ons bloed kom sit, eie geword aan ons mense en ons land. En dit kloof hom wortel toe.

In die wit nag bid ek saam met Dawid: Laat my weer blydskap en vreugde belewe…

beeld.com/Rubrieke/CecileCilliers/Verward-deur-die-donker-naat-van-ons-geweld-20130218

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If you don’t know about it, you can view plenty of videos on youtube about the Bush War – South Africa vs Angola – a war fought more than 20 years… This is a beautiful Afrikaans song. Visuals are great in the video.
Found this link: warinangola.com


I like this video clip more, as it’s not just still images – like the above video. South African troops can be proud of what they have achieved during the Bush War – they were real heroes.

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