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Archive for the ‘Literacy’ Category

 

Image: google

Silver

Slowly, silently, now the moon
Walks the night in her silver shoon;
This way, and that, she peers, and sees
Silver fruit upon silver trees;
One by one the casements catch
Her beams beneath the silvery thatch;
Couched in his kennel, like a log,
With paws of silver sleeps the dog;
From their shadowy coat the white breasts peep
Of doves in a silver-feathered sleep;
A harvest mouse goes scampering by,
With silver claws, and silver eye;
And moveless fish in the water gleam,
By silver reeds in a silver stream.

– Walter de la Mare

When i came across this poem – which I did with my y5’s, I couldn’t help to send it to Wipneus as she loves space, planets-stuff and always shows us great pics of outer space taken with her magic camera that zooms to the fine surface of any planet! lol! That’s on her old WP-blog. I couldn’t resist blogging it tonight as it’s such a great poem! written by a great poet! And enjoy this very short film, which I also used with my y5’s during Literacy. We did some drama  too and had a great time doing this unit. Do enjoy this brilliant animation! That was when I was told by the headteacher that I’m a natural “actress”…but I didn’t take that serious…hehe..

The video is not anymore available on youtube, but you can watch it on the following link:

http://nationalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/node/85960?uc=force_uj

It’s an animation of an Old Man whose Life and memories just go past him. He remembers stuff that is sad but the end is really great and happy.

Walter de la Mare…Image and info:poetryarchive.org

Walter de la Mare (1873-1956) was the prolific author of many volumes of poetry, short stories and novels, including one of the most enduringly popular poems in the English language, ‘The Listeners’. Born in Charlton, Kent, he was educated at St. Paul’s Cathedral Choir School in London. At sixteen he started work in the statistics department of Anglo-American Oil. He married in 1899 and had four children and for many years he struggled to balance the life of the writer with the financial demands of family until, in 1908, he received a Civil List pension which enabled him to concentrate on writing.
Read more
HERE about him.

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South Africans like pumpkin soup…and I lo–ove…pumpkin fritters! One blogger-friend….Ray…from “bookstoysgames”… has asked me for a soup recipe…..Ray has also joined the chess site and he’s beating me up in every game! He’s quite a keen chess player! I’ve found this video about pumpkin soup on the site.. : videojug.com This is a fantastic site! But, due to the code that WordPress doesn’t support… I had to download it and so, here’s the video showing step-by-step how to make pumpkin soup! If you click HERE, it takes you straight to the pumpkin soup-link where there are instructions which you can print off too… this is a good site for teachers teaching instructions to children in Literacy. I love pumpkin and pumpkin fritters is of course my favourite! Enjoy the video.

 

Image: decsey.com

Image vegbox recipes: Gem Squash

Image: organicbabystyle…Butternut…

Image: eb-art.com : This is basically all the types of pumpkins you get in SA.

Pumpkin fritters ….Pampoenkoekies. This is not my own recipe…but looking at the recipe…it looks very much like the fritters I would have. Read my comments at the bottom of the post.Scroll down for a recipe in English.

PAMPOENKOEKIES IN STROOP: resep: funkymunky.co.za

KOEKIES:
500ml gaar boerpampoen 250ml gesifte koekmeelblom
10ml bakpoeier 2ml sout
1 eier, geklits kookolie

STROOP:
15ml botter 375ml suiker
200ml melk 15ml mielieblom
175ml koue water

Maak pampoen goed fyn. Voeg meel, bakpoeier, sout en eier by en klop tot gemeng. Skep teelepelsvol in warm kookolie, druk effens plat en bak aan weerskante tot goudbruin en gaar. Dreineer op kombuispapier en skep in opdienskottel. Verhit botter, suiker en melk tot kookpunt. Los mielieblom in water op en roer in ‘n straaltjie by melkmengsel. Verhit tot kookpunt en gooi oor koekies. Dien warm op. Lewer 3 dosyn koekies.

 Ingredients

325 ml flour
20 ml baking powder
salt, to taste
625 ml butternut squash, cooked
2 eggs, separated
oil, for frying
125 ml boiling water
250 ml sugar
60 ml butter
250 ml milk
10 ml cinnamon
15 ml flour
salt, to taste

Directions

1. Sift all dry ingredients.
2. Mash pumpkin finely and beat in egg yolks.
3. Whisk egg whites till light and fluffy – not too stiff.
4. Gently mix egg whites into pumpkin and then fold pumpkin mixture into dry ingredients.
5. Fry tablespoonsful of fritter batter in hot oil until golden brown.
6. Drain on paper towel and place into ovenproof dish.
7. Now preheat the oven to 180°C.

SYRUP:
Bring water, sugar, butter, milk, cinnamon, and salt to the boil, lower heat and thicken with flour.
Pour syrup over fritters and bake for 15 – 30 minutes
recipe..: recipe bazaar .com
My comments… If I make fritters… I don’t add a syrup to it… I would only have a cinnamon/sugar mix to sprinkle on the fritters… this syrup sounds a bit too sweet to me. It doesn’t go into the oven if you don’t have the syrup…

This next video is about…a carrot cake! Another big yummy! Follow THIS LINK to print off the instructions.

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ISBN:0798139021
Herman Charles Bosman
Publisher:Human & Rousseau

 We read this book during secondary school and I loved these stories of “Oom Schalk Lourens”…”oom” means “uncle”… I think I should get myself this book again! I know I have one…packed away…very old copy…my dad used to go around at bookshops…when he was young…think I take after him in that way…lol! 

Herman Charles Bosman was one of South Africa’s best (yeah, I know I always call the story writers and poets the “best”…because I try to focus on the best if not the “very” best! lol)… classical story writers….read on Wiki about him… see you later…

Herman Charles Bosman (February 3, 1905 – October 14, 1951) is the South African writer widely regarded as South Africa’s greatest short story writer. He studied the works of Edgar Alan Poe and Mark Twain, and developed a style emphasizing the use of irony. His English-language works utilize primarily Afrikaner characters and point to the many contradictions of Afrikaner society in the first half of the twentieth century.

Bosman was born at Kuilsrivier, near Cape Town to an Afrikaner family, although he was raised with English as well as Afrikaans. While Bosman was still young, his family moved to Johannesburg where he went to school at Jeppe High School for Boys in Kensington. He was a contributor to the school magazine. When Bosman was sixteen, he started writing short stories for the national Sunday newspaper (the Sunday Times). He attended the University of the Witwatersrand submitting various pieces to student’s literary competitions.

Upon graduating, he accepted a teaching position in the Groot Marico district, in an Afrikaans language school. The area and the people inspired him and provided the background for all his best known short stories; the Oom Schalk Lourens series and the Voorkamer sketches. The Oom Schalk Lourens series features an older character with that name. the Voorkamer series are similarly all set in the Marico region.

During the school holidays in 1926, he returned to visit his family in Johannesburg. During an argument, he fired a rifle at his stepbrother and killed him.

Bosman was sentenced to death and moved to Death row at the Pretoria Central Prison. He was reprieved and sentenced to ten years with hard labour. In 1930, he was released on parole after serving half his sentence. His experiences formed the basis for his semi-autobiographical book, Cold Stone Jug.

He then started his own printing press company and was part of a literary set in Johannesburg, associating with poets, journalists and writers, including Aegidius Jean Blignaut. Needing a break, he then toured overseas for nine years, spending most of his time in London. The short stories that he wrote during this period formed the basis for another of his best-known books, Mafeking Road.

At the start of the Second World War, he returned to South Africa and worked as a journalist. He found the time to translate the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam into Afrikaans.
Read
HERE on Wikipedia…more about him…

Herman Charles Bosman’s best-loved stories about the Marico District are published here for the first time in the form intended by the author. This text of Mafeking Road – edited by Craig MacKenzie – is the first to appear from the original versions, with an introduction and notes on the texts.

Bosman’s storyteller figure Oom Schalk Lourens takes us into the world of the concertina-player who leaves the Marico for fame and glory; the girl who returns from finishing school to dazzle and dupe the Marico yokels; the Boer War soldier with a tragic story to tell about his son; the legendary leopard of Abjaterskop; the man who kills his wife and buries her under the dung floor of his voorkamer …

Jealousies, hatreds, loves and betrayals – the entire range of human emotions are laid bare in a manner at once humorous and satirical, romantic and ironic. Mafeking Road reveals to us a world quaint and distant … and yet powerfully familiar.

Herman Charles Bosman, who died of a heart attack in 1951, is one of South Africa’s most famous story-tellers. This is a classic collection of his short stories. As a person he had a unique way of seeing life, an intense excitement that he managed to convey in his stories. His books are pre-eminent in the field of South-African literature.
Read on THIS SITE more and you can view more books written by him in English as well as in Afrikaans.
You can order the book HERE from Kalahari.net….


Please click HERE to visit the Groot Marico on your next trip…this is HC Bosman-world…and read about Patrick Mynhardt…
Patrick Mynhardt was the Honory Life President of the HC Bosman Literary Society.

If you like this, you’d also like…

(for the witty teller of folk-tales:

-Mark Twain, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (1867) and other sketches and stories.

-Sholom Aleichem, Tevye’s Daughters, and other stories (c.1905-1916).

-O.Henry, Heart of the West (1907).

Click on THIS LINK to read more….

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The Lion and the Snake

The lion and the snake were fighting. The snake escaped the lion’s claws before the lion could kill it, and fled to the man’s house. The snake begged the man to hide it because the lion was pursuing it. The man hid the snake in his cupboard and the lion never found it, although he searched the house.When the lion had gone, the snake took his leave from the man, saying, “How are good deeds rewarded?” The man said, “Normally good deeds are rewarded with money, but since you have no money, you may give me an animal as soon as you have been successful at hunting.” The snake said, “But do you not know that snakes reward good with evil? I am going to devour you, man!” The man said, “No, no, that isn’t fair. We men always reward good with gratitude and useful goods. Let’s ask the bee first.” The bee said, “I never get any gratitude. Man just takes my honey after having smoked me out of my own house.” The man said, “Let’s ask the mango tree.” The mango tree said, “I never receive thanks. Man takes my fruits, and when I bear no more, he cuts me down and throws me into his fire.” The man said, “Let’s ask the coconut palm.” The coconut palm said, “It is true, good is rewarded with evil. Man takes my nuts, taps my sap, and to cap it all off, he cuts off my leaves for his roof.”The snake said to the man, “You see, now I will eat you.” The man said, “Wait until I have said goodbye to my wife.” The snake agreed and they went to the man’s house. The man said, “Dear wife, the snake is going to eat me, goodbye!” The wife said, “Surely, Mr. Snake, you would like some eggs as a hors d’ouevre?” She took a bag of eggs and held it open for the snake. The snake put in his head to take an egg. The woman pulled the string tight and so caught the snake with its head in the bag. Then she took a knife and cut its throat, saving her husband’s life. But the husband divorced her, for men reward the good women do them with evil.


Image: robartgallery.com

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