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Archive for the ‘Kasparov’ Category

Kasparov and Zuma. Photo: GCIS/Maroelamedia

Kasparov is currently in South Africa, setting up his Africa’s branch in South Africa, called KCFA – Kasparov’s Chess Foundation Africa. Whilst in South Africa, he played some chess too. Very proudly, a South African boy draws vs Kasparov. Read about this young lad. This is fantastic for such a young boy – that shows the potential amongst the South African chess players. I see another Chess Grandmaster-in-the-making for South Africa! Well done to Daniel! You made us proud! Kasparov was the one who offered Daniel the draw. Here’s the game.

[Date “2012.03.22”]
[White “Kasparov, Garryq”]
[Black “Barrish, Daniël”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B52”]
[WhiteElo “2812”]
[BlackElo “1862”]
[PlyCount “92”]
[EventDate “2012.03.22”]
[SourceDate “2012.03.22”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Qxd7 5. O-O Nf6 6. Qe2 g6 7. c3 Bg7 8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 O-O 10. Nc3 Nc6 11. Rd1 d5 12. e5 Ne8 13. Qb5 Nc7 14. Qb3 b6 15. Be3 Na5 16. Qc2 Nc4 17. Rac1 Nxe3 18. fxe3 Bh6 19. Qe2 Rfc8 20. Rc2 Nb5 21. Rdc1 Nxc3 22. Rxc3 Rxc3 23. Rxc3 Rc8 24. Kf2 Rxc3 25. bxc3 Qc6 26. g4 e6 27. Qc2 Bf8 28. Nd2 Qb7 29. Qb3 b5 30. Kf3 a5 31. e4 Bh6 32. exd5 Qxd5+ 33. Qxd5 exd5 34. Nb3 a4 35. Nc5 Bd2 36. Ke2 Bxc3 37. Kd3 Ba5 38. Nd7 b4 39. Nf6+ Kf8 40. Nxd5 b3 41. axb3 axb3 42. h3 h5 43. gxh5 gxh5 44. Nf4 h4 45. Ng2 b2 46. Kc2
Bc3 1/2-1/2

SACS pupil, holds chess great Kasparov to a draw
ONE of the greatest chess players of all time, former world champion Garry Kasparov, met his match yesterday in Khayelitsha where he was held to a draw by an 11-year-old Cape Town pupil, Daniel Barrish.

Kasparov was in Cape Town to promote a joint venture between his foundation and a local NGO providing local chess-based mathematics and science programmes aimed at under-privileged children.

Yesterday the Russian played simultaneous chess matches against 25 young people in Khayelitsha.

After going toe-to-toe with Barrish for three hours, the international chess grandmaster surrendered to the Grade 6 SACS pupil. Speaking to the Cape Times from his Constantia home, Barrish said it had been an honour for him to play Kasparov. “I was very happy that I was going to play him, even more that I drew with him. I was nervous and thought I was going to lose. He made a couple of mistakes, he was moving too fast and I capitalised. He had to fight for a draw,” the 11-year-old said.

Barrish, a three-time under- 10 national chess champion, has never conceded a defeat in his age group. He also won the African chess under-10 championship and is the youngest in the Springbok chess team.

His father Jean-Claude Barrish said he was proud of him: “He is good, he has lots of talent. He has put a lot of work into it. He is doing very well academically and what I like is that he balances everything out because he also plays cricket, rugby and tennis.”

While in SA, Kasparov’s foundation, Kasparov Chess Foundation Africa (KCFA), will work with Moves for Life (MfL), a local chess-based mathematics and science programme aimed at under-privileged children.

Last night Kasparov played head to head with 16-year-old South African chess champion Marcel Roberts at Table Mountain’s lower cablecar boardroom, when strong winds stopped them from playing on top of the mountain. Kasparov and Roberts played two short five-minute games.

President Jacob Zuma, patron of MfL, will today meet Kasparov to celebrate the opening of Kasparov’s Africa branch of his foundation.

Marcel Roberts photo: Reint Dykema
Please click HERE for an Afrikaans news article and HERE for iol’s article – both about Kasparov’s visit.

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World Chess Champion, Gary Kasparov is visiting South Africa!! Kasparov was the top rated player for 21 years.  He will be playing some chess on the 12th November. Pres Zuma has recently launched the MOVES FOR LIFE Chess development programme. From the link:

Kasparov comes from Moscow to South Africa on 12 November to form a joint venture with Tshwane/Pretoria based chess educational project Moves for Life (MFL).

13th Chess World Champion, Garry Kasparov, has announced that he wishes to link his Kasparov Chess Foundation to MFL to take the successful MFL formula to other African countries.

He has added that he plans to work with MFL to make Johannesburg the chess capital of Africa

Kasparov stated:. “I was greatly inspired by the words of President Zuma last October, when he spoke so movingly on the many benefits of chess for children – and of his remarkable connection to my beloved game. I am happy to join him and the South African Moves for Life programme in a commitment to bringing chess to schools across the country and for turning Johannesburg into the continental capital for chess.”

Kasparov will be visiting South Africa as the guest of MFL from the 12th – 15th November to promote the Kasparov Chess Foundation link up with the Moves for Life programme.

The Moves for Life programme was launched by President Zuma last year and has since expanded to over 50 schools around the country, resulting in measurable improvement in maths and science performance amongst children

Watu Kobese, Moves for Life trustee and one of South Afriva’s top chess players Operations says: “The game of chess impacts positively on Maths, Science and comprehension abilities while also imparting valuable life skills to children. In learning to play chess, children are mastering a wide range of skills such as pattern recognition, classifying information, reasoning by analogy, following principles, calculating possible sequences of events and critical thinking — which in fact helps with all their academic subjects,”

President Jacob Zuma, is clear that there is a place for chess in South Africa’s education system. When President Zuma launched the MFL initiative in 2010, he highlighted the benefits of chess saying, “We want to convince parents and teachers that chess is one of the most powerful tools available to strengthen and enhance a child’s mind.”

Moves for Life is now training over 6000 children per week and has trained more than 200 educators in 2011 both to teach chess in schools and also as an extra-curricular activity.. According to Kasparov, “The Moves for Life programme is already doing a wonderful job and we expect to cooperate and aid them in developing both their chess and sponsorship efforts. To promote our activities, chess in the media, and to inspire the grassroots, I will personally donate my time, to train South Africa’s most promising young players as well as the country’s elite teams, as I have done in the United States with great success.

The mission of the Kasparov Chess Foundation: Africa will be to bring the many educational benefits of chess to children throughout Africa by providing a complete chess curriculum with associated enrichment programs. The foundation promotes the playing of chess as a cognitive learning tool in classes and in after-school programmes for primary and high schools. The Moves for Life programme has both the South African experience as well as the material developed uniquely for the African situation. Through collaboration both KCF and MFL will be able to optimise all available resources and reach their respective goals.

“Chess is an individual sport, but promoting chess is not. With your support, Johannesburg will take a prominent place alongside New York, Brussels and Sao Paulo,” says Kasparov.

In June this year the Kasparov Chess Foundation launched its European leg, based in Brussels. The Foundation has ambitious plans to develop a programme for the entire European Union. On September 20th, the Kasparov Chess Foundation Europe presented its proposal at the Headquarters of the European Union.

Update: Saturday 12/11/2011
 Was really disappointed when reading on CHESSA’s site about MFL, Kasparov, etc. I agree, MFL is a PRIVATE company and HERE is Dr Kemm,  one of the 5 trustees of MFL and hopefully he will do something to get CHESSA also involved in this important visit – a visit our Chess players look forward to.  This is a visit that happens only ONCE in a life time and Chess South Africa is not even fully involved! MFL: You CAN do something about it.

Update [again] – Saturday 19/11/2011

If you are interested to read Mickey’s reaction as a MFL-trustee – you can read his comments in the comments box. It’s sad to know that MFL actually contacted CHESSA and that CHESSA asked MFL to cancel Kasparov’s visit. I think CHESSA needs to ‘grow up’ and show that they are there for the Chess community in South Africa and that they are serious about developing Chess in South Africa. CHESSA’s article is misleading the general public about their role in Kasparov’s visit. CHESSA is obviously not thinking about their international image.

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In the Chess World the Russian Chess Federation was under sieged…it seemed. Read on this link what happened. Kasparov and Karpov are both involved in this FIDE-matter. [The link will open in a new window.] There are some little green mendressed in yellow – involved too. I hope you enjoy my edited image. [click on the image for a larger view] See original images
HERE and also here. You can see Mr Spock playing chess in Star Trek here.
See two more edited images of  ‘Flash’ Karpov here on my blogger-blog.

Image: chessgames

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Valencia Karpov Kasparov 
valencia

Image: Chessbase


Image: wikimedia –
The  World Chess Championship 1984 was a match between challenger Garry Kasparov and defending champion Anatoly Karpov. After 5 months and 48 games, the match was eventually abandoned in controversial circumstances with Karpov leading five wins to three (with 40 draws), and replayed in the World Chess Championship 1985.


Image: wikimedia – The Word CC 1985
The 1985 World Chess Championship was played between Anatoly Karpov and Garry Kasparov in Moscow from September 3 to November 9, 1985. Kasparov won. The match was played as the best of 24 games. If it ended 12-12, Karpov would retain his title.

Kasparov Karpov 2009

2009 – September – and the word biggest Chess Engines meet again…25 years on. Follow their games live on the top link on my blog’s side bar or click HERE to follow their games live. [the best link to follow their games live is the next link at the bottom of this entry…the site is chessok.com]

Click on this link to play through their blitz-games. The link will open in a new window.

 http://www.chessok.com/broadcast/?key=KKblitz.pgn&game=0

Image: Chessbase

Game 1

Results round 1 – Kasparov vs Karpov — 1-0

round 1 move 16

Game 1 – move 16 = please click on images for a clear view

Game 2

Game 2 – Kasparov vs Karpov 1-0 [site:chessok.com]
Please click here to play through the games interactively on chessok.

Game 2 Kasparov vs Karpov

Game 2  Kasparov, Garry  —  Karpov, Anatoly  1-0  Défense Semi-Slave

Game 3 Karpov vs Kasparov

Game 3  Karpov, Anatoly  —  Kasparov, Garry  1-0  -Gruenfeld 3.g3

Game 4 Kasparov vs karpov

Game 4  Kasparov, Garry  —  Karpov, Anatoly 1-0  Défense Semi-Slave

Karpov vs Kasparov

KK

chess men

Game 1

[White “Karpov”]
[Black “Kasparov”]
[WhiteElo “2644”]
[BlackElo “2812”]
[Result “0-1”]
[GameID “479”]
[UniqID “446210”]
[WhiteClock “0:00:00”]
[BlackClock “0:08:33”]
[Stamp “509”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nb6 7. Ne2 c5 8.
d5 O-O 9. O-O e6 10. Nbc3 Na6 11. h3 exd5 12. exd5 Nc4 13. b3 Nd6 14. Bf4
b6 15. Qd2 Bb7 16. Rad1 Nc7 17. g4 Qd7 18. a4 f5 19. g5 Rad8 20. Bg3 f4 21.Nxf4 Nf5 22. Nb5 Nxb5 23. axb5 Nd4 24. Ne6 0-1

KasparovKarpov

Chess is a game that rarely draws a massive amount of attention from the global public, but a rematch between Kasparov and Karpov reminds us that it throws up the occasional great rivalry.

When Garry Kasparov challenged Anatoly Karpov in 1984 for the chess world championship, it was the beginning of a titanic struggle.

The contest lasted five months and featured a series of successive draws of 17 and 15 games. It was controversially ended by the chess authorities over fears for the health of the players, both of whom had lost weight during the struggle. Kasparov had been resurgent at the end, although Karpov still held a lead.

In 1985, Kasparov beat Karpov for the title. They played for it again in 1986 and again Kasparov won. In 1987, Kasparov was one down going into the final game, but recovered to tie the series and therefore retain his crown.

It was a great chess rivalry, but it was more than that to the watching public and pundits.

“It was very symbolic of what was happening to the Soviet Union,” says grandmaster Raymond Keene, chess correspondent for the Times. “It was obvious the USSR was going through a period of great turmoil.”

And the rivalry was perfect in pitching a brilliant, brooding outsider against the Soviet establishment’s main man.

“Kasparov was a southerner, half-Jewish, half-Armenian, much younger, in the vanguard of a change, taking on the golden boy of the old Soviet Union,” says Keene.

Keene organised the London matches of the third series between the players in 1985, which took place both in the UK and Leningrad. He was surprised by the stark disparity between the Soviet and the Western ways of organising things.

In London, after the matches, a list of moves with annotation was faxed all over the world within 15 minutes of the conclusion. In Leningrad, a sheet bearing only the moves was typed up, a press officer with a minder was taken to the local party HQ where the only photocopier was to be found, the sheet was copied and then manually handed only to the journalists present at the event.

“They were still mired in Soviet bureaucracy and fear of publicity. I thought ‘this place is doomed’.

“It was a gigantic metaphor for the collapse of a creaking, unviable, introspective, conglomerate empire.”

There had been other rivalries that never succeeded in sparking the imagination. Mikhail Tal against Mikhail Botvinnik in the early 1960s had the same hallmarks of the non-Russian outsider against the Soviet stalwart, but failed to develop into a sustained struggle. And the earlier battle between Vasily Smyslov and Botvinnik is probably one for chess aficionados only.

The other rivalry that spread outside the world of chess was between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky. Their famous 1972 world championship match became another symbol of the struggle between civilisations.

Fischer was the Western maverick up against Spassky, the emblem of the powerful Soviet machine. And Fischer won.

“It was about Western individualism, depth of analysis, use of the technology available,” says Keene.

And the notion that ideas of a greater struggle would be imposed on chess was an invention of the Stalinist era.

The Communist official Nikolai Krylenko took his board games seriously. He was reported to have said: “We must organise shock brigades of chess players, and begin immediate realisation of a five-year plan for chess.”

He might have approved of the great rivalries with an ideological flavour that grew up in the 1970s and 80s. He would have been less delighted that on both occasions the Soviet establishment’s representative was bested.

Other sports have individual rivalries. Tennis has had some great ones.

But perhaps only boxing, with its system of champion and challengers, comes close to replicating the way that the protagonists have to study each other’s play and personality, even live in each other’s skin, during the mind-bogglingly detailed preparations for a world championship series.

KarpovKasparov

Spassky Fischer

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Enjoy the video of the “history” behind Kasparov and Deep Blue  of IBM.
 

I like the idea of the music supporting this game of Kasparov!

Please Click HERE for a game between Kasparov and Kramnik 1994, Munich.

Please click HERE to play through a game of Karpov and Kasparov played in 1985 at the World Chess Championships.

Chess players’ quotes:

Even a poor plan is better than no plan at all. – Mikhail ChigorinUnknown:

If chess is a science, it’s a most inexact one. If chess is an art, it’s too exacting to be seen as one. If chess is a sport, it’s too esoteric. If chess is a game, it’s too demanding to be “just” a game. If chess is a mistress, she’s a demanding one. If chess is a passion, it’s a rewarding one. If chess is life, it’s a sad one. Vladimir Kramnik- Interview- 22/12/2005– “For us chess players the language of artist is something natural,” in his interview with German artist Ugo Dossi. “For me art and chess are closely related, both are forms in which the self finds beauty and expression …” Kramnik: “The development of beauty in chess never depends on you alone. No matter how much imagination and creativity you invest, you still do not create beauty. Your opponent must react at the same …. To a certain extent it is like a dance. Both dancers must be creative, in order to keep the creativity flowing. Tartakower:1.Chess game is divided into three stages: the first, when you hope you have the advantage, the second when you believe you have an advantage, and the third… when you know you’re going to lose! – Tarrasch .. 2. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy. – Alexander Alekhine: 3. ..”Chess is a beautiful mistress.”-Garry Kasparov… 4. ..”Chess is mental torture”…. Wilhelm Steinitz… 5. ….”Chess is not for timid souls. “…Kasparov.. 6. …”Chess is an art.”

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Former Russian world chess champion Kasparov freed from jail

MOSCOW, Nov. 29 (Xinhua) — Russia’s former world chess champion and the opposition United Civil Front leader, Garry Kasparov, was freed from jail Thursday after being held for five days for organizing an illegal rally.    “He was released slightly earlier than we expected,” a member of his movement was quoted by the RIA Novosti news agency as saying.

    Kasparov was arrested in central Moscow on Saturday while leading a march of opposition group The Other Russia, which comprises the People’s Patriotic Union, led by former premier Mikhail Kasyanov, the banned National Bolshevik Party, headed by writer Eduard Limonov, and Kasparov’s United Civil Front.

Kasparov

Source here

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