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janvanriebeeck
Image: Wikipedia – Painting  of Jan van Riebeeck by: Charles Davidson Bell
Jan_van_Riebeeck
Jan van Riebeeck – image: wikipedia

This is my entry of 6 years ago. I would like to update it with a few images from twitter. As South Africa has so many ‘issues’ over the past few years, some people are looking to put the blame on something or somebody. It’s always first ‘Apartheid’ who’s at fault and next it’s poor Jan van Riebeeck. Well, it’s so much easier if you can blame other people for your mistakes or when you are at fault. I always tell the children I’m teaching: Be a strong, brave person. Don’t blame somebody else. My view: you are a weak person if you blame somebody else. You should take the punch, get over it and move on. Make a difference next time. At least Jan van Riebeeck brought civilization to South Africa. That is making a difference! I love the British take on Jan van Riebeeck in this entry. It’s worth reading it. 

JanvanRiebeeck6

I thought to share this image from twitter too. Very clever and I imagine Jan van Riebeeck would have loved it.

JanvanRiebeeck_NeilvanVuuren

A cartoon from twitter.

JanvanRiebeeck7

Van Riebeeck’s statue overlooking Table Mountain.

JanvanRiebeeck3

This image is interesting. This clearly shows – from the diary of Jan van Riebeeck – that he actually did pay for the land he obtained in the Cape. 

Jan van Riebeeck played a significant role in our history in South Africa. Until 1994, 6th April used to be a Public holiday as it is Founders day. For many Saffas this day will still be ‘Founders day’ and we will commemorate the day, even if it is only in our thoughts. The music video in this entry is Carika Keuzenkamp singing about South Africa. Even though you might not understand the language, you will enjoy the beautiful scenes in SA.
Van Riebeeck was born in Culemborg in the Netherlands as the son of a surgeon. He grew up in Schiedam, where he married 19-year old Maria de la Quellerie on 28 March 1649. (She died in Malacca, now part of Malaysia, on 2 November 1664, at the age of 35). The couple had eight children, most of whom did not survive infancy. Their son Abraham van Riebeeck, born at the Cape, later became Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies.

Joining the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1639, he served in a number of posts, including that of an assistant surgeon in the Batavia in the East Indies. He subsequently visited Japan. His most important position was that of head of the VOC trading post in Tonkin, Vietnam. However, he was called back from this post as it was discovered that he was conducting trade for his own account.

In 1651 he was requested to undertake the command of the initial Dutch settlement in the future South Africa. He landed three ships Drommedaris, Reijger and Goede Hoop at the future Cape Town on 6 April 1652 and fortified the site as a halfway-station for the VOC trade route between the Netherlands and the East Indies. The Walvisch and the Oliphant arrived later, having had 130 burials at sea.
Please click on
THIS LINK to read more on Wikipedia.

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If you don’t know about it, you can view plenty of videos on youtube about the Bush War – South Africa vs Angola – a war fought more than 20 years… This is a beautiful Afrikaans song. Visuals are great in the video.
Found this link: warinangola.com


I like this video clip more, as it’s not just still images – like the above video. South African troops can be proud of what they have achieved during the Bush War – they were real heroes.

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‘Life is not a matter of milestones, but of moments’: Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy

I was more interested in the chess scene in this clip, but then inquisitively read about Joan and her story, which I knew about, though it was ‘refreshing‘ to read about it again, truly a very sad story. I guess, as things were at the time, it was ‘normal‘ for what had happened, but surely not in our modern days. I think Joan is an inspiration to us and must have been a brave woman to do what she did and believed in, especially at the very young age of only eighteen.

Joan of Arc
The story and biography of Joan of Arc which contains interesting information, facts and the history about the life of this Medieval person of historical importance.

The Childhood of Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc Lived from 1412-1431.  In the long wars between the French and English not even the Black Prince or King Henry V gained such fame as did a young French peasant girl, Joan of Arc. She was born in the little village of Domrémy . Her father had often told her of the sad condition of France, how the country was largely in the possession of England, and how the French king did not dare to be crowned. And so the thought came to be ever in her mind, “How I pity my country!” She brooded over the matter so much that she began to have visions of angels and heard strange voices, which said to her, “Joan, you can deliver the land from the English. go to the relief of King Charles.” At last these strange visions and voices made the young girl believe that she had a mission from God, and she determined to try to save France. When she told her father and mother of her purpose, they tried to persuade her that the visions of angels and the voices telling her of the divine mission were but dreams. The village priest, her young companions, even the governor of the town, all tried to stop her, but it was in vain.

1429 – Joan of Arc meets King Charles VII, the King of France, at Chinon.
Little by little people began to believe in her mission. At last all stopped trying to discourage her and some who were wealthy helped her to make the journey to the town of Chinon , where the French king, Charles the Seventh, was living. When Joan arrived at Chinon, a force of French soldiers was preparing to go to the south of France to relieve the city of Orleans which the English were besieging. King Charles received Joan kindly and listened to what she had to say with deep attention. The girl spoke modestly, but with a calm belief that she was right. “Gracious King,” she said, “my name is Joan. God has sent me to deliver France from her enemies. You shall shortly be crowned in the cathedral of Rheims. I am to lead the soldiers you are about to send for the relief of Orleans. So God has directed and under my guidance victory will be theirs.” The king and his nobles talked the matter over and finally it was decided to allow Joan to lead an army of about five thousand men against the English at Orleans.

Joan of Arc marches to Orleans
When she left Chinon at the head of her soldiers, in April, 1429, she was in her eighteenth year. Mounted on a fine war-horse and clad in white armor from head to foot, she rode along past the cheering multitude. In one hand she carried an ancient sword that she had found near the tomb of a saint, and in the other a white banner embroidered with lilies. The rough soldiers who were near her left off their oaths and coarse manners, and carefully guarded her. She inspired the whole army with courage and faith as she talked about her visions. When she arrived at the besieged city of Orleans she fearlessly rode round its walls, while the English soldiers looked on in astonishment.

Joan of Arc wins victory over the English and ends the siege at Orleans.
She was able to enter Orleans, despite the efforts of the besiegers to prevent her. She aroused the city by her cheerful, confident words and then led her soldiers forth to give battle to the English. Their success was amazing. One after another the English forts were taken. When only the strongest remained and Joan was leading the attacking force, she received a slight wound and was carried out of the battle to be attended by a surgeon. Her soldiers began to retreat. “Wait,” she commanded, “eat and drink and rest; for as soon as I recover I will touch the walls with my banner and you shall enter the fort.” In a few minutes she mounted her horse again and riding rapidly up to the fort, touched it with her banner. Her soldier almost instantly carried it. The very next day the enemy’s troops were forced to withdraw from before the city and the siege was at end. The French soldiers were jubilant at the victory and called Joan the “Maid of Orleans.” By this name she is known in history.

Joan of Arc sees the King crowned at Rheims
Her fame spread everywhere, and the English as well as the French thought she had more than human power. She led the French in several other battles, and again and again her troops were victorious. At last the English were driven far to the north of France. Then Charles, urged by Joan, went to Rheims with twelve thousand soldiers, and there, with splendid ceremonies, was crowned king. Joan holding her white banner, stood near Charles during the coronation. When the ceremony was finished, she knelt at his feet and said, “O King, the will of God is done and my mission is over! Let me now go home to my parents.” But the king urged her to stay a while longer, as France was not entirely freed from the English. Joan consented, but she said, “I hear the heavenly voices no more and I am afraid.”

Joan of Arc is captured
However she took part in an attack upon the army of the Duke of Burgundy, but was taken prisoner by him. For a large sum of money the duke delivered her into the hands of the English, who put her in prison in Rouen.

Joan of Arc is charged with Sorcery and brought to trial
She lay in prison for a year, and finally was charged with sorcery and brought to trial. It was said that she was under the influence of the Evil One. She declared to her judges her innocence of the charge and said, “God has always been my guide in all that I have done. The devil has never had power over me.” Her trial was long and tiresome. At its close she was doomed to be burned at the stake.

Joan of Arc is burnt at the Stake
In the market-place at Rouen the English soldiers fastened her to a stake surrounded by a great pile of fagots. A soldier put into her hands a rough cross, which he had made from a stick that he held. She thanked him and pressed it to her bosom. Then a priest, standing near the stake, read to her the prayers for the dying, and another mounted the fagots and held towards her a crucifix, which she clasped with both hands and kissed. When the cruel flames burst out around her, the noble girl uttered the word “Jesus,” and expired.

Source: Click here to read the original article.

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hitler and lenin

An etching of a young Hitler playing chess against Lenin 100 years ago

Image:thetelegraph.co.uk

The image is said to have been created in Vienna by Hitler’s art teacher, Emma Lowenstramm, and is signed on the reverse by the two dictators.

Hitler was a jobbing artist in the city in 1909 and Lenin was in exile and the house where they allegedly played the game belonged to a prominent Jewish family.
In the run-up to the Second World War the Jewish family fled and gave many of their possessions, including the etching and chess set, to their housekeeper.

Now their housekeeper’s great-great grandson is selling the image and the chess set at auction. Both items have a pre-sale estimate of £40,000.

The unnamed vendor is confident the items are genuine after his father spent a lifetime attempting to prove their authenticity.

He compiled a 300-page forensic document that included tests on the paper, the signatures and research on those involved.

Experts, however, have questioned its authenticity especially the identification of Lenin who they say might have been confused with one of his associates.

When the etching was made, Hitler was 20 and Lenin was twice his age and the house was where politicos went to discuss things.

The etching is thought to be one of five and shows Hitler – playing with the white pieces – sitting by a window, with Lenin opposite him in half shadow.

It is titled “A Chess Game: Lenin with Hitler – Vienna 1909”.

It raises tantalising questions about what the two men who helped shape the world in the 20th century might have spoken of.

Lenin was already a highly influential Russian figure who in 1907 went into exile once more after the revolution was crushed by Tsarist authorities.

Richard Westwood-Brookes, who is selling the items, said: “This just sounds too good to be true, but the vendor’s father spent a lifetime proving it.

“He compiled a 300 page document and spent a great deal of money engaging experts to examine the etching.

“The signatures in pencil on the reverse are said to have an 80 per cent chance of being genuine, and there is proof that Emma Lowenstramm did exist.

“The circumstantial evidence is very good on top of the paper having been tested.

“Hitler was a painter in 1909 and his Jewish teacher Emma Lowenstramm was the person who made the etching.

“There is some suggestion that when he came to power Hitler protected her and she died from natural causes in 1941.

“At the time, Vienna was a hotbed of political intrigue and the house where this game took place belonged to a prominent Jewish family.

“Lenin at the time was moving around Europe in exile and writing “Materialism and Empirio-criticism”.

“His movements are hazy and it is known that he did play chess and later he certainly wore wigs as a disguise.

“It is also known that Lenin was a German agent and the house was where people went to exchange political views.

“The chess set is clearly the same chess set as that in the etching. It is a box chess set that folds out and the pieces are identifiable – particularly the kings and bishops.

“To my knowledge there are five etchings of this image, but this has the signatures of both men and the artist.

“The provenance is that it has come through the family of the housekeeper who was given it when the Jewish family fled in the late 1930s.

“The family is based in Hanover and it is the great great grandson of the housekeeper who is selling it.

“On all sorts of levels it is an extremely valuable artefact. Even as just an allegorical picture it shows the men playing chess possibly for the world.”

Historian Helen Rappaport, who has just written a book called “Conspirator: Lenin in Exile”, said the etching was probably a “glorious piece of fantasy”.

She said: “In 1909 Lenin was in France and there is no evidence that he was in Vienna.

“In October he went to Liege in Belgium and in November he went to Brussels. He would have visited Vienna before and after that year.

“He liked the place and went there because he travelled around Europe on trains, but he wouldn’t have been there long enough to meet a young Hitler.

“He was also as bald as a bat by 1894 with just hair on the sides of his head.

“And when in exile he was not known as Lenin and instead used a number of aliases.

“The person believed to be Lenin in the etching may well have been one of his revolutionary or Bolshevik associates who was misidentified.

“It may even have been an Austrian socialist with whom he associated in the Second International.

“The Germans did fund the Bolsheviks and gave them millions of marks for the revolutionary effort, but Lenin was not a German sympathiser.

“Although this is totally spurious it is wonderful to bring these two great megalomaniacs together.

“It makes sense retrospectively and the history of art is full of retrospective meetings between people.”

The items are to be sold at Mullock’s auction house in Ludlow, Shropshire, on October 1.

See the News article here

chess8

When you see a good move, look for a better one
–Emanuel Lasker

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abrahamwessels
Image: bornagainredneck.blogspot.com

Since I have started teaching in  Secondary schools in the UK, it has been interesting to know what is being taught in schools and to compare to what we teach in South Africa. Curriculum-wise, the contents is of course exactly the same when it comes to all subjects, apart from history, as all countries teach the history of their country more intensively for obvious reasons. Colleagues are always interested to know about the country you’re from  and you do enjoy the diversity in students/teachers – all from different countries and to get to know the different cultures too. I’ve met teachers from Spain, France, Canada, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Greece, Poland, New Zealand, Australia, Portugal, Nigeria, too many to name! One thing is for sure, teachers are teachers, it doesn’t matter from which country you are, your background, we all share some personal traits. Yesterday, I had the opportunity to chat with a history teacher and I was given a text book and when paging through the book, my eye caught the topic on South Africa – and it was interesting to read through the text, but then when I read the section about slavery, I couldn’t believe the distorted account of the events/history during the 1700’s-1800’s, e.g. one “fact” was that the British abolished slavery (which is the truth), but then the distorted view:  it was the cause of the Great Trek.  As if the “boers” had wanted to have slaves and decided to trek due to the abolishment of slavery. Ee….e.r… that’s not the cause of the Great Trek in 1838… I would suggest that you read Patrick’s blog if you were taught that distorted fact at school. Also, if you are/were under the impression that we had slaves in SA –  after slavery was abolished – then you really do have a distorted view of SA and what really happened there. I would then urge you to make sure you have the facts.

 I’ve found Patrick’s blog with a clear explanation of our history. He explains it clearly, in an interesting way. I have really enjoyed reading his entry and I would like you to make an effort and visit his blog-entry. You will find the link at the bottom of this entry. I also have a link to one of my early-entries, which you might want to follow too. I’ve found tons of information and many links which you will enjoy. I think history-textbooks need to be rewritten for Secondary schools in the UK… but, we all know why history always got written the way it is written, don’t we?

C.D. Jewell, author of Liberalstein, says about Born Again Redneck:
“This blog interested me first because of the title. But the quality of Patrick Joubert Conlon’s writing has kept me coming back. His style is not presumptuous or pompous or condescending; it’s plain and simple. Good old American English. Which is funny because Mr. Conlon was born and lived in South Africa for his first twenty one years and after that spent eight years in England before finding his home here in the U. S. His blog provides a rare outsider/insider perspective on the U. S. of A. He’s been linked to by CNN on a couple of occasions and one of his posts was cited by the official Fred08 website. He does a lot of politics but also some lighter fare as well. He frequently posts spectacular photos taken on his Oregon farm.”

A quote from Patrick’s blog… and I do hope that you will follow the link and read the complete entry. All links will open in a new window.

They first introduced a law to force the Khoi and other so-called “free” blacks to work for as little as possible. The Hottentot Code of 1809 required that all Khoi and other free blacks carry passes stating where they lived and who their employers were. Persons without such passes could be forced into employment by white masters.

Parliament in London then established a circuit court to monitor conditions in the western Cape. This court offended many Afrikaner sensibilities by giving equal weight to the evidence of “servants” and “masters,” black and white alike. The British also raised a force of colonial police, including Khoi, to enforce the court’s authority. The British also forbade the use of “Cape Dutch” (which patois eventually developed into the Afrikaans language) in court.

In 1815 a Dutch-speaking Afrikaner farmer who refused to answer a court summons for mistreating a Khoikhoi employee was shot dead while resisting arrest. Relatives and neighbors rose in what became known as the Slachter’s Nek Rebellion, but their resistance was soon crushed, and the British hanged five of the rebels.

Some Afrikaners migrated eastward. These Afrikaners were known as Trekboers (itinerant farmers – “trek” is Afrikaans for “travel” and “boer” means “farmer.”) Then the British stopped the Boers eastward trek by annexing all of the Eastern Cape and establishing their own colony there in 1820. That is when my father’s ancestors, the 1820 Settlers, arrived in South Africa.
Read a clear explanation by Patrick
HERE

You can read my blog-entry on the following link:

https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2007/09/23/boer-war-art-poetry-and-history/

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sarie_mare1868
Sarie Marais (Mare) 1868


This audio file is Sarie Marais played by the Royal Marines
Any South African knows this song very well. If someone from South Africa doesn’t know this song, then he pretends his a South African- hehe. Sarie Marais is a song which runs in your blood if you’re a Saffa. Interesting to know that the British Royal Marines have adopted it…even the French! Near to the bottom of this post you can find the link to the Royal Marines’ site and I’ve found the translation of this song in English/French too. I grew up in the Transvaal, but the Eastern Transvaal, which is now called Mpumalanga and I will always sing…”bring me back to my dear Transvaal”! I have the history of Sarie Marais in Afrikaans and if you want it translated, give me a shout and I’ll do it in a week’s time. At the bottom of this post, you will find a link to an entry about Die Huisgenoot…uit Toeka se dae!
Sarie Marais
http://www.geocities.ws/paulmare69/stories/sarie_marais.htm
sariemaraisroos
Sarie Marais Rose – image: sariemarais.com

Sarie magazine
Sarie magazine, first published in 1949 under the title, Sarie Marais

Sarie July 1949

Image: sarie.com…the first Sarie published 6th July 1949! volg die link na Sarie-webadres. The link to Sarie’s site will open in a new window.
http://www.sarie.com/lees/artikels/waar-het-sarie-haar-naam-vandaan-gekry

Sarie 60 jaar

Sarie is 60! Image: sarie.com

Sarie-web

Sarie on the web! at sarie.com

Susara Margaretha (Sarie) Maré
Die eerste dogter van Jacob Philippus Maré en Cornelia Susanna Jacoba Erasmus was Susara Margaretha. Sy is op die plaas Eendraght, Suikerbosrand, distrik Heidelberg, gebore op 15 April 1869. Haar pa was Jacob Maré, wat later ‘n lid van die uitvoerende raad van die Transvaal geword en na wie ‘n straat in Pretoria genoem is.

Hierdie is dié Sarie Marais (eintlik Maré) wat in die wyk van die Mooirivier gewoon het, ook bekend as Tant Mossie, volgens die SA biblioteek se katalogus-inskrywing AP.1998-227.

Haar ouers was Voortrekkers, en het hulle in die omgewing van die Suikerbosrand gevestig. Die dorpie Heidelberg het toe nog nie bestaan nie. Die grootste konsentrasie Voortrekkers het hulle in die wyk Mooirivier bevind, waar die dorp Potchefstroom aangelê is.

In hierdie tyd was daar vyf wyke in Transvaal:

Mooirivier (Potchefstroom)
Magaliesburg (Rustenburg)
Marico (Zeerust)
Ohrigstad
Zoutpansberg (Pietersburg).
Suikerbosrand was in die wyk van Mooirivier geleë, wat gestrek het vanaf Potchefstroom tot die huidige Wolmaransstad en Makwassie.

Toe sy 16 jaar oud was, het sy vir Jacobus Petrus Toerien, ‘n verslaggewer van Di Patriot van die Paarl, ontmoet. (Hy was toe in Pretoria om ‘n onderhoud met haar pa te voer). Hy het onder die skuilnaam Jepete in “Ons Kleintje” geskrywe in sy hoedanigheid as subredakteur van “Di Patriot”. Hulle is getroud en het 16 kinders gehad, van wie net 8 grootgeword het.

Hy het by Amerikaners wat in Transvaalse myne gewerk het die liedjie Sweet Ellie Rhee gehoor, wat sy oorsprong in die Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog gehad het en deur Septimus Winner (Alice Hawthorne) geskryf is. In die tydperk tussen die Eerste en Tweede Vryheidsoorloë het Jepete die woorde vertaal en só sy vrou, Sarie Maré, verewig. Die lied het ook nie aanvanklik al die versies en presies dieselfde woorde gehad het as wat ons vandag ken nie. Maré het later weens ‘n drukfout Marais geword.

 

Teen 1899 was Sarie Marais reeds ‘n treffer in Pretoria. In die Anglo-Boereoorlog het dit nie net gewild by die Boeremag geword nie, maar ook by ander soldate. Dit het later wêreldbekend geword omdat duisende Suid-Afrikaanse soldate dit in die Eerste en Tweede Wêreldoorlog gesing het.
Die gewildheid het het só gegroei dat die Britse Royal Marines dit as regimentsmars aangeneem het. Hul opleidingskip heet ook Sarie Marais. Dit is ook die regimentsmars van Paraguay se seinerskorps. Die eerste Suid-Afrikaanse seiljag se naam was ook Sarie Marais en duisende besoekers het al in die Durban-hawe op die Sarie Marais-plesierboot gevaar. Die eerste Suid-Afrikaanse rolprent se naam was Sarie Marais. Sarie, sustertydskrif van Die Volksblad, heet ook na haar. Tot hotels en woonstelblokke is na haar genoem.


Op die eerste internasionale radio-uitsending tussen Suid-Afrika, Brittanje en Amerika op die verjaardag van mev. Isie Smuts, vrou van die destydse premier, generaal Jan Smuts, het die sangeres Gracie Fields Sarie Marais gesing.
In die Tweede Wêreldoorlog het ‘n buitestasie van soldate in Noord-Afrika die naam “Sarie Marais Calling” gehad. Die Suid-Afrikaanse weermag is steeds lief om die mars op parades te speel, terwyl die Franse Vreemdelinge-legioen dit ook gebruik. Dit is ook die amptelike lied van die Girl Guides in Sri Lanka (Ceylon) wat dit aan die begin van die vorige eeu by die Boerekrygsgevangenes daar gehoor het. In die jare dertig van die vorige eeu is dit verkeerdelik op die Olimpiese Spele in Amerika as Suid-Afrika se amptelike volkslied gespeel. Duitsers het ‘n pienk roos met die naam Sarie Marais gekweek, waarvan voor die Pantserskool in Tempe, Bloemfontein, geplant is.

Inligting: sien die geocities-link soos hierbo aangedui.Daar word beweer dat “My Sarie Marais” se “oorsprong” is van die Amerikaanse liedjie:

Sweet Ellie Rhee

Sweet Ellie Rhee, so dear to me
Is lost forever more
Our home was down in Tennessee
Before this cruel war
Then carry me back to Tennessee
Back where I long to be
Amid the fields of yellow corn
To my darling Ellie Rhee.

My Sarie Marais

My Sarie Marais is so ver van my hart,
Maar ‘k hoop om haar weer te sien.
Sy het in die wyk van die Mooirivier gewoon,
Nog voor die oorlog het begin.

Koor:

O bring my trug na die ou Transvaal,
Daar waar my Sarie woon:
Daar onder in die mielies by die groen doringboom
Daar woon my Sarie Marais,
Daar onder in die mielies by die groen doringboom
Daar woon my Sarie Marais.

Ek was so bang, dat die kakies my sou vang,
En ver oor die see wegstuur;
Toe vlug ek na die kant van die Upington se sand
Daar onder langs die Grootrivier.

Koor

Die kakies is mos net soos ‘n krokodillepes
Hul sleep hou altyd watertoe.
Hulle gooi jou op ‘n skip vir ‘n lange lange trip
Die josie weet waarna toe.
Koor

Verlossing het gekom, en die huistoe gaan was daar,
Trug na die ou Transvaal,
My liewelingspersoon sal seker ook daar wees
Om my met ‘n kus te beloon.

Koor
English translation:

Sarie Marais

My Sarie Marais is so far away from my heart,
But I hope to see her again.
She lives in the district of Mooiriver,
Since before the war began.

Refrain:

Oh, take me back to my dear Transvaal,
To where my Sarie lives:
There down by the maïsfields near the green thorn tree,
That’s where my Sarie lives.
There down by the maïsfields near the grren thorn tree,
That’s where my Sarie lives.

Refrain:

I was so scared that the English would catch me,
And send me away accross the sea;
That’s when I fled in the direction of the sandflats near Upington,
There down by the Orange River (formerly Great River)

Refrain:

The English are just like crocodiles,
They always drag you down to the water.
They trow you on a ship for a very long trip,
Only the Lord knows where to.

Refrain:

Liberation came, and it was time to return home,
Back to my dear Transvaal.
The person I love will certainly be there,
To reward me with a kiss.

SARIE MARAIS was also adopted by the French Army

Sarie Mares

Chant d’amour Sud-Africain du XVIII° siècle, il est chanté dès 1946 au peloton d’Extrême-Orient. A partir des années 1970, il s’impose comme chant de marche à l’EMIA.

O Sarie Mares, belle amie d’autrefois
En moi tu demeures vive.
L’amour est plus fort que la pluie et que le vent.
Qui peut arrêter son élan ?

Oui, je veux revoir, dans mon vieux Transvaal,
Ma ferme au toit de chaume.
Où le parfum du miel, et des conifères embaument.
L’air pur est clair comme un cristal. (bis pour les deux derniers)

O Sarie Mares est bien loin de mon coeur
Mais je crois en son amour.
Car c’est entre ses bras que j’ai connu le bonheur.
J’irai la revoir un jour. (bis pour les deux derniers)

Quand j’étais petit, je croyais qu’un démon
Venait me ravir ma maison.
Mais lorsque je fus grand, ce fut une horrible guerre
Qui m’emmena loin de mes terres. (bis pour les deux derniers)
http://www.nationalanthems.us/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1136108511

Sarie Marais
Arranged Sir Vivian Dunn
This march was adopted by the Royal Marines in 1953 as the offical march of the Royal Marines Commandos and is played after the Regimental March on ceremonial occassions. This recording is taken from the CD ‘The King’s Squad’ by the Band of HM Royal Marines Commando Training Centre and features the Adjudant giving that famous order “Royal Marines, to you duties… quick march”

http://www.royalmarinesbands.co.uk/audio/Index_audiomp3.htm

Helmut Lotti – Sarie Marais – with a perfect Afrikaans accent!

 Royal Marines Commandos – Sarie Marais

On youtube you can watch the French version too.

And Sarie Marais in the movies!


Op hierdie volgende link kan jy lees oor die Huisgenoot uit Toeka se dae! Die link sal in ‘n nuwe bladsy oopmaak.
https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2009/01/17/from-ye-olde-and-not-so-old/

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Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc

This song by OMD is one of my favourite songs. Coincidentally, it was also today Joan of Arc’s info which I’ve found on “this day in history”. Enjoy this song on this Saturday night!

Joan's birthplace is now a museum
Joan’s birthplace is now a museum

Joan of Arc, or Jeanne d’Arc in French,(c. 1412 – May 30, 1431)was a 15th century national heroine of France. She was tried and executed for heresy when she was only 19 years old. The judgment was broken by the Pope and she was declared innocent and a martyr 24 years later. She was beatified in 1909 and canonized as a saint in 1920.

Joan of Arc was born to Jacques d’Arc and Isabelle Romée in Domrémy, a village which was then in the duchy of Bar (and later annexed to the province of Lorraine and renamed Domrémy-la-Pucelle). Her parents owned about 50 acres (0.2 square kilometers) of land and her father supplemented his farming work with a minor position as a village official, collecting taxes and heading the local watch. They lived in an isolated patch of northeastern territory that remained loyal to the French crown despite being surrounded by Burgundian lands. Several local raids occurred during her childhood and on one occasion her village was burned.

Joan said she was about 19 at her trial, so she was born about 1412; she later testified that she experienced her first vision around 1424 at the age of 7 years, or other sources say at the later age of 12 when she was out alone in a field when the voices appeared. She had said she cried when they left as they were so beautiful. She would report that St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret told her to drive out the English and bring the Dauphin to Reims for his coronation.

At the age of 16 she asked a kinsman, Durand Lassois, to bring her to nearby Vaucouleurs where she petitioned the garrison commander, Count Robert de Baudricourt, for permission to visit the royal French court at Chinon. Baudricourt’s sarcastic response did not deter her.She returned the following January and gained support from two men of standing: Jean de Metz and Bertrand de Poulengy. Under their auspices she gained a second interview where she made a remarkable prediction about a military reversal near Orléans.

She has remained an important figure in Western culture and many other nations. From Napoleon to the present, French politicians of all leanings have invoked her memory. Major writers and composers who have created works about her include Shakespeare, Voltaire, Schiller, Verdi, Tchaikovsky, Twain, Shaw, Brecht, Anderson, Honegger, Cohen and Anouilh. Depictions of her continue in film, television, song, and even video games.

Read more about Joan here.

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