Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘chess games’ Category

sa

This is one of my own poems. It is a cento. A cento is a poem written using other author’s lines or passages. This ‘cento’ though has been written using my own poems. The poems I used are all from my Afrikaans poems. I do write English too, but as I said before, it’s just playing with words. I don’t try to be professional. I decided a few years ago to do my ‘bit’ for Afrikaans on the 14th August every year. Unfortunately, it didn’t happen last year and I couldn’t let another year go by without having one on this day! This is the history behind the 14th August.

The Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners (Afrikaans for “Society of Real Afrikaners”) was formed on 14 August 1875 in the town of Paarl by a group of Afrikaans speakers from the current Western Cape region. From 15 January 1876 the society published a journal in Afrikaans called Die Afrikaanse Patriot (“The Afrikaans Patriot”) as well as a number of books, including grammars, dictionaries, religious material and histories. Die Afrikaanse Patriot was succeeded in 1905 by today’s Paarl newspaper. You can read more about this Society on this link on the site of Wikipedia.

If you are Afrikaans,  I hope you enjoy these couple of lines.

seagold-

My siel op haelwit wolke

In gietende reën sypel my gedagtes: eindloos!
Ek stuur vir jou die goud
van sondeurdrenkte landskappe
in die galery van my stille gemoed.
My opgevoude gedagtes steek vas
en onderhou my geheue
wat onvermydelik verstrengel is
en soos gister
vind jy my siel op haelwit wolke;
my gedagtes wentel om die aura van my taal
en rol ragfyn ligstraaltjies voor my uit:
wat die tuimelende bergstilte
laat rol oor die dansende blou waters
na die holtes van my gedagtes.

==Nikita 14/08/2015 


Mantovani is one of my real big favourites. On this video you’ll find a whole library of his music to keep you company. I hope you enjoy!

If you are a regular reader of my blog, you would know that I do play chess myself too. I’ve blogged quite a few chess games in the past. This is one of my most recent chess games on chess.com Time is little to play rated chess games and I was tricked into this game, but managed to escape the worst. Rated games involve more concentration and I tend to play friendlies just for fun and I feel I can ‘escape’ or shut down from normal work and enjoy the game. 

chesscom
I like how I managed to checkmate my opponent, though he was very close to checkmate me! I played white in this game – not my favourite colour, as I discovered I play better games when I play black. If you are interested, please click here to play through the game. If you are a chess player yourself, please feel free to leave a comment and Dan, if you read here, you might want to analyse my game…hehe.
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

anand2

FWCM_logo-

Click HERE for the Official site.

Anand_Carlsen_schedule

Scheduleanand_game1
Game 1
anand_game1-

Game 1: Carlsen vs Anand 1/2

Anand_Magnus_round1

Images: Official site: chennai2013.fide.com

Anand_Magnus_round1-

Moves: game 1
1. Nf3 d
2. g3 g6
3. Bg2 Bg7
4. d4 c6
5. O-O Nf6
6. b3 O-O
7. Bb2 Bf5
8. c4 Nbd7
9. Nc3 dxc4
10. bxc4 Nb6
11. c5 Nc4
12. Bc1 Nd5
13. Qb3 Na5
14. Qa3 Nc4
15. Qb3 Na5
16. Qa3 Nc4
#FWCM2013  #AnandCarlsen

anandcarlsen

The King vs The Crown Prince

Game 1 – Live

Anand_Carlsen_game2

Anand vs Carlsen – Game 2 move 1-7

Anand_Carlsen_game2_

Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 8-14

Anand_Carlsen_game2_1Anand vs Carlsen Game 2 move 15-21

Anand_Carlsen_game2_finalAnand vs Carlsen Game 2 Final position 1/2

Game 2 Live

anandcarlsen-3
Game 3 Photo: Official Site
Game 3: DRAW
Carlsen vs Anand 1/2
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. c4 dxc4 4. Qa4+ Nc6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Nc3 e5 7. Qxc4 Nge7 8. O-O O-O 9. d3 h6 10. Bd2 Nd4 11. Nxd4 exd4 12. Ne4 c6 13. Bb4 Be6 14. Qc1 Bd5 15. a4 b6 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. a5 Rab8 18. Re1 Rfc8 19. axb6 axb6 20. Qf4 Rd8 21. h4 Kh7 22. Nd2 Be5 23. Qg4 h5 24. Qh3 Be6 25. Qh1 c5 26. Ne4 Kg7 27. Ng5 b5 28. e3 dxe3 29. Rxe3 Bd4 30. Re2 c4 31. Nxe6+ fxe6 32. Be4 cxd3 33. Rd2 Qb4 34. Rad1 Bxb2 35. Qf3 Bf6 36. Rxd3 Rxd3 37. Rxd3 Rd8 38. Rxd8 Bxd8 39. Bd3 Qd4 40. Bxb5 Qf6 41. Qb7+ Be7 42. Kg2 g5 43. hxg5 Qxg5 44. Bc4 h4 45. Qc7 hxg3 46. Qxg3 e5 47. Kf3 Qxg3+ 48. fxg3 Bc5 49. Ke4 Bd4 50. Kf5 Bf2 51. Kxe5 Bxg3+ ½-½

anandcarlsen_game3_move29
Game 3 move 29
anandcarlsen_game3
Game 3 final position

game4
Game 4: Anand vs Carlsen 1/2 Draw
Moves
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 ½-½
game4_
Game 4 move 33

game4_-
Game 4 – Final position

Game 5 – Magnus 1 Anand 0

game6move28

Game 6 Anand vs Carlsen – move 28

game6-move32
Game 6 move 32 – I feel Anand could have made a better move with his pawn on d, which he ‘gave’ away.
game6-move33
Game 6 move 33 – game looks like a draw to me – Anand not sure what to do? Bet you they are going to draw this one!
game6-move41
Game 6 still going – move 41

game6-finalmove

Game 6 Final Move – Anand 0 – Magnus 1

Read Full Post »

b3218934567321

I’ve been looking at some of my games played a few years ago and just to post a game to go with these two games from chessgames, I’ve decided on this game HERE – for no particular reason. You can play through the game on the link. I played black.

chessendN

End position of my game

chessking-1

One of my very old games, played in 2006- I was black and you can see my rating – not that I was really bothered to improve my rating, time to really think about moves, doesn’t exist in my life of full time teaching. [hehe] I liked how I was chasing my fellow countryman around on the board, whilst he was in a really strong position early on in the game.

chessbishopattack

A game played in 2005 – and I like how I used my bishops here. My opponent resigned on this point.

chessking_1

In this game – where I played black – I was lucky. My comments on this game: a very interesting game I’d played in a long time – well, that was in 2006. I like the checkmate in this game. 

You can click HERE to play through the game.

In these next two chess games, you can see some bizarre chess openings…with a King… play through the first game on this link  on chessgames.

chessking01

Not that I think I’m the best chess player, but look at THIS GAME  game, not sure what he was trying.

chess-kingo

Have you seen The King and I?

Read Full Post »

Indeed the name Prokofiev needs little introduction, as one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. However his connection to chess might be a little less obvious, even to the musically enlightened. As to David Oistrakh, he was one of the very greatest violinists, whose virtuosity ranked alongside Fritz Kreisler and Jasha Heifetz. Both of them were passionate chess players, though Prokofiev more than one would believe.
Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev, born April 23, 1891, died March 5, 1953 was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor who mastered numerous musical genres and is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century, which include Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Among his best-known works are the 3rd Piano Concerto, the third and fifth symphonies, as well as composed family favourites, such as the ballet Romeo and Juliet – from which “Dance of the Knights” is taken – and Peter and the Wolf. Sergei Prokofiev fell in love with chess at an early age, and during his lifetime never lost his passion for the royal game, befriending chess greats such as Capablanca and Alekhine.The composer met Alekhine in his native Russia in 1900 during an international tournament held there. Alekhine was a member of the organizing committee and Prokofiev had volunteered to accommodate the guests and the players. As the years passed, their friendship solidified. He met Capablanca in January 1914 in Petersburg where the Cuban champion was playing a series of simultaneous games. Prokofiev tried his luck and even managed to win a game!

The game:
[Event “1914 Tournament”]
[Site “St. Petersburg, Russia”]
[Date “1914.05.16”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Jose Raul Capablanca”]
[Black “Sergei Prokofiev”]
[ECO “D02”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “86”]

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 Bf5 4.Qb3 Nc6 5.Qxb7 Na5 6.Qa6 Nxc4
7.Nc3 e6 8.e4 dxe4 9.Bxc4 exf3 10.Qc6+ Nd7 11.g4 Bg6 12.Bg5
Be7 13.Bxe7 Kxe7 14.O-O-O Re8 15.h4 h5 16.gxh5 Bxh5 17.Nb5 Kf8
18.d5 Qf6 19.dxe6 Ne5 20.Qc5+ Kg8 21.exf7+ Bxf7 22.Bxf7+ Qxf7
23.Kb1 Rab8 24.Nxc7 Rbc8 25.Rc1 Re7 26.Qd6 Rexc7 27.Rxc7 Qxc7
28.Qe6+ Kh8 29.a3 Qc2+ 30.Ka1 Nd3 31.Rb1 Nxf2 32.h5 Qc6 33.Qf5
Ne4 34.Qxf3 Nd2 35.Qxc6 Rxc6 36.Rd1 Rc2 37.Rg1 Rc5 38.Rg6 Rxh5
39.Ra6 Nb3+ 40.Ka2 Ra5 41.Rxa5 Nxa5 42.b4 g5 43.Kb2 g4 0-1
Another great combination: Chess and music! What’s missing is the poetry! The closest I could get was the poem by Robert Frost.  Please click HERE to read the entire article on Chessbase.

Fire and Ice – Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

You can read my entry on Dance of the knights  on this link. The music is also the theme music to The Apprentice.


A young Sergey Prokofiev with his inseparable board
and chess books. [Image: chessbase]


Prokofiev in his later years remained faithful to his true love [Image: chessbase]

Read Full Post »

Registration is open for the African Youth Chess Championships – the closing date is 31st August 2012.

The tournament will be held in Pretoria, Gauteng, one of the 3 Capital Cities of South Africa from 28 September 2012 (official arrival date) to 08 October 2012 (official departure date) at the Faircity Roodevallei Hotel & Conference Centre (Roodevallei). Players will be accommodated at Roodevallei.

Click HERE for more details about the tournament. You will also find a link to live games and photos.[All links will always open in a new window on my blog]

The Venue of the African Youth Chess Championships – see the link for more details of the Venue.

Update: 13/10/2012

Phew, what a task to get all these results displayed in a format easier than an excel document! Why should it so difficult to publish results in a table easy for anyone to observe. Well, I’ve done it now and I hope you find it useful to look at the results and to see where South Africa’s future in Chess lies?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Photo: Official site

The Braille Chess Olympiad starts tomorrow! Please click HERE to read more about the Chess Braille Olympiad in Chennai [India] . The tournament starts 9th August till 19th August. Chess is the only game visually impaired players can play on an equal footing with sighted players.
Please click HERE to follow some of the games live!

Team South Africa at the Braille Olympiad. Good luck to all players and we wish you a great tournament! Click the image for a larger view.

South Africa at the Olympiad – photo: official site

Read Full Post »

Image: Susan Polgar chess blog – image edited

Anand and Gelfand – image: chessdom

Anand – image: Anastasia Karlovich

It’s again time for the FIDE World Chess Championship – this time Anand vs Gelfand at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Follow the link of the official site to read more.The prize fund is 2.55 million US Dollars. The winner gets $1,530,000 (60%) and the loser $1,020,000 (40%)
Official site: Chess FIDE Moscow

This is the second entry on my blog, on THIS LINK you can follow the first 6 games – with some chess graphics too. Six games have been played. Six draws. Is it Anand’s tactic, is he warming up? What about a prediction: 6 more draws within the next week.

Game 7 – move 8

Game 7 – Anand explained where his ‘mistake’ was – the Bishop on C8!- which he lost

Game 7 moves – [grrr for the Houdine comments in the PGN-file too- I tried to remove it neatly]

Click HERE to play through game 7. The link will open in a new window.

Anand during the interview after Game 7 – explaining his Bishop-mistake +My opinion about move 26: unnecessary lost of his Knight on E4 too.

Game 8 Anand vs Gelfand 1-0

Game 9 – Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2-12

Game 10 Anand vs Gelfand – 1/2-1/2

Game 10 moves

Countdown startinggame 11

Anand – Gelfand – taking their positions

Standings

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – move 16

Anand – game 11

Game 11 – Gelfand

Game 11 – draw agreed

Game 11 Gelfand vs Anand – 1/2 – 1/2

Game 12 – Anand vs Gelfand 1/2-1/2

Standings: Anand 6 – Gelfand 6. Now – for the tie break on Wednesday! Still crossing my fingers for Anand!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »