Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Afrikaans stories’ Category

chess-mates

chess lord of the rings

Lord of the Rings chess set

chess winnie the pooh

Winnie the Pooh-chess set.

Sometimes you can get kids into chess if they play with themes-based chess sets. Little ones find it funny.  I’ve found a few. These are chess sets with themes based on story book tales and other fictional literature. Please click here to view more or to order one of these sets. On the left bar – of this link – you can click on ‘themed chess sets’ to view even more.

I’ve done an entry about chess in the movies before. On this link you can read my entry about chess in the movies. More than 1700 movies have used chess and it seems to me the movies do love chess! On this link you can read about the chess game in “Alice through the looking glass” and also read about Alice in Wonderland..the real Alice too. On my Chess Humour-page, you can see Steve McQueen and Faye Danaway in the famous chess scene from the movie: The Thomas Crown affair, 1968.

Martie Preller is an Afrikaans writer. I don’t have to say too much about her as you can only look at all her awards and know that she’s one of South Africa’s brilliant writers of fiction in Afrikaans as well as in English. She has published more than 50 books – the titles are on her website too. She also has written the Balkie-series, a very popular series in South Africa available in English too. She has sent me some scanned images from her books where chess is featured. Her own son is also a chess player. I have for you some extracts from her books and in particular from an English story too. This story hasn’t been published as yet and she’s hoping to find an overseas publisher willing to publish her book. The title of the story is: “The face of Ilev”. Near to the end in this story you read about chess.

Please click here for Martie Preller’s website.

Awards
1994: Silver Sanlam Award for Youth Literature for Anderkantland
1996: ATKV Children’s Book Award for Daar’s ‘n spook in my kas
1996: ATKV Children’s Book Award for Jy en Toetenkat
1996: C.P. Hoogenhout Medal for Anderkantland
1996: Sanlam Award for Youth Literature for In die tyd van die Esob
1998: In die tyd van die Esob is added to the Honours Role of IBBY (International Board on  Books for Young People)
1999: Runner-up in competition for short fiction (De Kat & Human & Rousseau)
2001: Alba Bouwer Award for Children’s Books for Die Balkieboek
2002: ATKV Children’s Book Award for Die Balkieboek
2003: Tienie Holloway Medal for Babalela and Lisa het ‘n plan
2004: M.E.R Award for Children’s Literature for Ek is Simon
2006: Tienie Holloway Medal for Diep, diep in ‘n donker bos 

Die hart van Zeebak

Die hart van Zeebak

I have copied Martie’s quotes as  sent to me. Some in Afrikaans, some in English. Please visit her website for more information and her CV in both languages.

Hart van Zeebak:
Ferdinand en Ben is ‘n tweeling en na ‘n ongeluk is Ben verstandelik gestrem. Ben was die uitblinker en Ferdinand die stiller ou. Na Ben se ongeluk, ignoreer al die maats ens hom natuurlik en skielik is Ferdinand baie belangrik vir almal ens ens. NOU is hy cool.  En hy voel ook hy moet “opmaak” vir Ben wat nou niks meer kan doen nie ens. Ferdinand probeer deal deur met sy fiets in die bosveld te gaan ry ipv om soos sy maats na matriek see toe te gaan. Toe beland hy in die dorpie – waar hy skaak speel en leandra hom kom weglok na ‘n ander planeet. Later kom hy weer terug. Praat weer met die ou man ens. Dus gaan dit eintlik oor skaak en die manier van speel en keuses ens. As ‘n beeld van die lewe ens.

Bladsy 19 – Die hart van Zeebak

“Hy kyk om hom. ‘n Paar tafeltjies met verbleikte rooi-en-wit geruite tafeldoeke. By ‘n tafeltjie in ‘n hoek sit ‘n ou man met ‘n skaakstel klaar uitgepak op ‘n skaakbord voor hom. Die ou man kyk na hom, glimlag en beduie met sy kop na die skaakstel. Hoekom lyk hy so bekend? wonder Ferdinand.

-nog skaakverwysings kan op bladsye 96-101 gevind word.

Zeebak 18,19

Zeebak 20,21

 Zeebak 95

These 3 images are scanned images from her Afrikaans story: Die hart van Zeebak. [The heart of Zeebak]- click on the images for a larger view.

Summary of Esob in IBBY’s catalogus:

“In die tyd van die Esob (In the Time of the Evil) is a science-fiction novel set somewhere in the future after the collapse of civilization.
Against the backdrop of a technocratic regime ma¬nipulated by an evil, coldblooded man and his android minions, each of four young people strives to be the win-ner in a competition that tests their physical, mental and survival skills. The main protagonist, Nina, takes the reader with her on an odyssey of shifting realities and transmuting landscapes that test her belief in reality, the meaning of existence and herself. It is a harsh and frustrating journey during which she has to learn to discern good from evil. In a time of unnatural colonization and brainwashing she has to learn the meaning and value of human emotions.
The book celebrates the strength and endurance of the human spirit. It is structured in a post modernistic way by means of a multi-layered perspective as three different narrators who may or may not be the same person, narrate the story.”

Extract:

THE FACE OF ILEV

by

Martie Preller

– a free translation of
“In die tyd van die Esob”
(In the time of the Esob)
by the author
* “Bose” is the Afrikaans word for “evil” – I spelled it backwards in the original text. The “Esob” is a character in the story. As I could not use “evil” spelled backwards in English, I used the word “Ilev” as the name of this character.
© Martie Preller 2005

We all knew that we were the chosen ones. What we did not know was that that year would be different. Completely different from all previous years.

I knew Daniel, Leonard and Matilda well. I knew their weak points. We had lived together for three years. We had lived and learnt.

The competition in die Training School was fierce. Only the best came out on top. In the first year, there were forty candidates, the next year only twenty and the final year, there were only ten and of those ten, it was undisputed that Daniel, Leonard, Matilda and I would be chosen. We were the best by far.

But the formal announcement had not been made yet. Perhaps I should start my story there: on the day that Zufar and Zandra did the announcement: the day of the fiery red sun.

*****

The amphitheatre glowed in the rays of the red sun. Our two pale round moons hung just above the two dark brown pillars of Odgo, one moon on each side of the entrance to the amphitheatre. The invited guests filled all the seats. The uninvited had to watch the ceremony on their screens.

The Winners of the previous years sat in the front row. They were wearing their red cloaks over their grey tunic suits This was the day, the long-awaited day.

Everyone was quiet. Our people never spoke unless it was necessary. We, the ten of our final year, stood behind the stage waiting for Zufar and Zandra to start the ceremony. We did not speak either, because there was nothing to say.

Daniel kept on throwing his cloak back over his shoulder. Leonard looked as if he was listening to a silent voice, his head slightly turned, with a frown on his face. Matilda was fiddling with her cloak’s tassels. The other six were just standing there. They would not exchange their grey cloaks for white ones. And they knew it.

The drums started rolling. It started as a soft murmur that grew and grew until it filled the amphitheatre with a sound so loud that it filled your head completely and then the drums waned until everything was quiet again. Zufar’s deep voice boomed through the amphitheatre. He talked in his usual staccato way. He irritated me today. When I was young, he was so impressive. Now he was just Zufar.

Then it was Zandra’s turn to speak. Her drawl would not let go of the words as if she wanted to keep them to herself. Her face was half hidden behind a turban that she wore low over her forehead. Zufar and Zandra were reciting the opening words. They too were Winners, long ago and were wearing their red cloaks.

The single shrill note of a trumpet called us to the stage. Everybody’s eyes were fixed on us. It was like that every year. Every year everybody already knew who would be chosen, but still they had to hear it officially from Zufar and Zandra.

We took up our seats in the front row. The trumpets tore the sky with the song of our people. But it was a song without words.

Zufar and Zandra announced our names one by one. Nina. Daniel. Matilda. Leonard. We stepped forward to receive our white cloaks. The silence in the amphitheatre was neutral. I never knew whether they cared or not.

Back in our seats, we dropped the grey cloaks and slung our white cloaks around our shoulders.

The drums rolled again and then the ceremony was over. Tomorrow would be our final preparation day.
———-end of extract of the story from the start.

—-near to the end.
“But now I have a problem.” He suddenly sat upright. “ Do you know the game of chess? No, of course you won’t. It dates from our pre-history. But in the game, you have a white queen and a black queen. But the problem is, although I have really enjoyed talking to you, I am now stuck with two blond queens, and the one will have to go, unfortunately. You have no chance against the other Nina. She is the better of you in all aspects, so I choose her. And I decided that Nina and Daniel would take over the city. A new ruler would be introduced. Nina, with Daniel at her side. But of course not, this Daniel.” He smiled. “And Nina would go down in the annals as the Queen who ruled with an iron fist.” He smiled again. “Now isn’t that a fitting description of Android-Nina?” he asked.

He was right. I stood no chance against Android-Nina. But I can put my hands around Ilev’s throat and squeeze the life out of him.

“And just in case you think you can do something to me, Nina,” he read my thoughts again. “I took precaution. There is a special code that only I know, that must be fed to the Master-Computer every thirty minutes. If that doesn’t happen, the Master-Computer is programmed to destroy the city and all its inhabitants immediately.”
Balkie

Balkie, a character that features in the Balkie-series written by Martie. This series is available in English and Afrikaans – you can view it on her website.

Babalela

Babalela Kensington

When you click on “Op die Internet” [on the internet] -on Martie’s webpage,  you will find an Afrikaans newspaper article about Babalela’s travels in London.

babalela andries maritz

Babalela in one of the books as illustrated by andriesmaritz.blogspot.com

anim13

If you click on this image, (it is an animated image), you will see the covers of about 7 more books written by Martie. It does take a second or two for the animation to change, so please have patience.

Die storie agter die storie van Vandag is nie gister nie

Ek het jare gelede begin wonder wat het van die karakters geword wat reeds hulle stories met my gedeel het in bestaande publikasies. Ek was seker hulle is daar êrens (in ’n storie-dimensie?) waar hullle voortgaan met hulle lewens. Ek was reg! Hulle het my weer gekry en het weer ’n stuk van hulle lewens met my gedeel. Hulle het natuurlik net ouer geword, soos ons almal, daarom is hierdie ’n roman vir volwassenes.
Die volgende karakters kom weer in Vandag is nie gister nie voor. Al die publikasies is huidig (Augustus, 2009) nog in druk.

Nina, Daniël, Matilda en Leonard

Nina, Daniël, Matilda en Leonard is die hoofkarakters in In die tyd van die Esob (Tafelberg, 1996).

“Die uitsonderlike Afrikaanse jeugboek kan kompeteer met sy Europese en Amerikaanse eweknieë.”
Uca Eiselen

Dit het in 1996 die Sanlamprys vir Jeuglektuur gewen en is in 1997 opgeneem in die IBBY Ererol (International Board on Books for Young People).

Sanlam-prysaanbeveling- op Martie se webbladsy

Die woorde in die tweede paragraaf van die gedeelte wat ek aanhaal uit Petra Grütter se Sanlam-prysaanbeveling vir In die tyd van die Esob het soms by my bly spook:

“’n Mens wil nie te veel van die boek self verklap nie, want dis ’n werklik uitdagende teks, wat ook van die keurders vereis het om hulle dinkmasjientjies in te stel vir nuutlees. ’n Boek soos die verstel die verwagtinge binne die hele jeugboekletterkunde – dit is baken leeswerk.
Wat ’n mens wel kan sê, is dat onvolkomenheid en voorlopigheid ook hier ’n rol speel – want die sentrale karakter, wat ook die wenner word, is ’n onvolkome persoonlikheid, en die getekende skryfster van die boek, wat uiteindelik ook in die teks manifesteer, laat ’n duidelike aanwysing na dat die teks ook nog nie klaar is nie. Dis ’n voorlopige verslag oor ’n buitengewone gebeurtenis, dinamies onvoltooid.”       
Ek het in 2000 vir ’n groep leerders by Linden Hoërskool in Johannesburg storiemaakklasse gegee. Hulle het ’n jaar of wat vantevore In die tyd van die Esob in die skool behandel en wou by my antwoorde hê, soos byvoorbeeld: Watter Nina het regtig die boek geskryf? Ek het natuurlik nie antwoorde gehad nie. Hoe moet ek weet? Nou het ek vir hulle ’n antwoord, waar hulle ookal nou mag wees – Nina in Vandag is nie gister nie móét nog In die tyd van die Esob skryf . . .

Ek weet nog steeds nie presies wat Petra bedoel het daarmee nie, maar dit het gevoel asof daar dalk nog iets moes kom – maar wat? In die tyd van die Esob was definitief “voltooid.”


Aanhalings uit In die tyd van die Esob

Bladsy 9

Dit het alles gebeur in die tyd van die Esob. Ons het almal geweet wie gekies sou word, maar wat ons nie geweet het nie, was dat daardie jaar anders sou wees, anders as al die vorige jare. Ek het Daniël en Leonard en Matilda geken. Ek het ge¬weet wat hulle swak punte was. Op slot van sake het ons drie jaar lank saam gebly en geleer.
Die kompetisie in die leerskool was straf. Net die bestes het bo uitgekom. Na die eerste jaar is die aanvanklike veertig kandidate uitgedun tot twintig, en die laaste jaar was ons net tien. En almal het geweet dat ek, Daniël, Leonard en Matilda die bestes sou wees. Miskien sal dit goed wees om ons storie daar te begin, by die dag toe Zufar en Zandra die aankondiging gedoen het, die dag van die rooison.

Bladsy 96

Die skrywer sit haar woordverwerker af en staan stram op. Sy kyk deur die venster. Dis laatmiddag; die reën is verby. “Kom, Leonard. Matilda!” roep sy haar twee steekhaarbrakkies. Hulle kom aangehuppel. Sy sit hulle halsbandjies aan. Sy sluit die voordeur oop. Die hondjies storm uit en trek haar agter hulle aan. Sy lei hulle veilig oor die straat. Die promenade is verlate. Die reën het seker die gebruiklike stappers weggehou
Sy stap af totdat sy die branders kan sien breek op die blinkswart rotse. Dan loop sy aan met die breë sement- paadjie. Daar sien sy horn sit. Op hulle bankie. Sy gaan sit langs hom. Hy glimlag. Twee middeljarige mense op ’n bankie langs die see.
“Is jou boek klaar?” vra hy.
“Amper.”
Sy dink aan toe sy jonk was en hoe deurmekaar alles gevoel net. En sy dink aan hoe deurmekaar alles nou nog is. Wysheid en ouderdom loop nie noodwendig hand aan hand nie.
“’n Mens sien nie met jou oë nie, maar met jou hart,” sê sy.
“Is dit waaroor jou boek gaan?”
“Ek wens ek het geweet . . . Miskien,” sê sy na ’n rukkie. “’n Mens sien nie met jou oë nie, maar met jou hart,” herhaal sy. “Ek dink ek het dit êrens gelees.”
Sy kyk na die grys wolke wat swaar oor die see hang en wonder of iemand haar ook uitgedink het.

Ferdinand Daniël en Ben

Ferdinand Daniël en Ben kom albei voor in Die hart van Zeebak (Tafelberg, 2004). Ferdinand is die hoofkarakter wat probeer vrede maak met wat die ongeluk aan Ben gedoen het.
Die boek was in 2005 op beide die M-Net-boekprys (kort formaat) en die MER-prys vir kinder- en jeuglektuur se kortlyste.
Toe die storie van Vandag is nie gister nie begin bymekaar kom, het ek skielik besef dat Ferdinand se Leandra, op wie hy so verlief was in Die Hart van Zeebak besonder baie soos Nina in In die tyd van die Esob lyk, dus, natuurlik was Daniël se name Ferdinand Daniël en ná sy ervaring op Zeebak, het hy verkies om Daniël genoem te word . . .

Resensie van Die Hart van Zeebak in Die Burger: 8 Januarie 2005 deur Mariana Loots

Stel jou voor jou stoutste droom word waar. Die een droom wat jy geweet het nie ’n kans het om waar te word nie. Dit is presies wat met Ferdinand Basson gebeur. Bergaf met sy fiets bevind hy hom een laatmiddag skielik op ’n misterieuse dorp, misterieus en stil.
Hier daag ’n eksentrieke inwoner hom tot ’n potjie skaak, maar iets trek sy aandag: Wie is die pragtige blonde meisie wat hom bly ontglip?
Die Hart van Zeebak is ’n boeiende wetenskap- fiksie-verhaal vir tieners rondom 17 jaar. Die hoofkarakter, Ferdinand, was pas klaar met sy matriek eksamen toe hy deur Leandra, ’n inwoner van Zeebak, na ’n ander dimensie ontvoer word. Maar nie alles is pluis nie. Hoekom is daar so baie dinge wat hom aan sy tweelingbroer, Ben, herinner, voor en ná die ongeluk? En waarheen verdwyn die ou oom en tante by wie hy loseer bedags?
Benewens die nagmerries wat Ferdinand teister, bly volg ’n robot hom en ten spyte van al sy vrae, steek Leandra steeds iets vir hom weg. Daar is egter nie tyd om behoorlik oor hierdie dinge te tob nie: iemand moet Nimron en Supremus se bose planne stuit.
Die skrywer, Martie Preller, bied hierdie bildungsroman op kenmerkende wyse aan: ’n jong held moet verskeie (werklik en nie-so-werklike) hindernisse oorkom om dit waarvoor hy bestem is te bereik. Die roman staan veral uit vanweë die keurige taalgebruik. Preller skram nie weg van die moderne woordeskat nie, maar boet geensins die ryke tradisie van die Afrikaanse taaljuwele in nie. Die aanbod en verloop van die verhaal herinner aan een van Preller se vorige romans, In die tyd van die Esob (1996) Laasgenoemde speel ook in ’n surrealistiese werklikheid af en soos dit hoort, oorwin die goeie uiteindelik die slegte.
Die Hart van Zeebak is ’n opwindende, aksiebelaaide jeugroman wat te midde van alles wat gebeur ook onder die oppervlak kyk.
Deur Ferdinand se ervaringe sien lesers hoe om ook dieper dinge te hanteer, selfs al voel dit deel van ’n ander wêreld. Weer eens ’n roman met die Preller-gehaltemerk.

Aanhaling uit Die Hart van Zeebak

Bladsy 43

“Meneer,” begin hy, “het ons nie vanmiddag skaak gespeel nie?”
Die ou man kyk hom uitdrukkingloos aan. “Jong man,” sê hy. “Daar is baie werklikhede. Hierdie is maar een van hulle. Hy glimlag byna onmerkbaar, steek sy hand uit en streel oor die houtmasker. Wat bedoel hy? Baie werklikhede? Ferdinand wil ’n halfmiljoen vrae vra, en tog kan hy nie aan een dink nie. Wat is dit met hom? Dis sy. Dis die flippen alien wat hom so deurmekaar het. Hy is meteens doodmoeg, asof hy van baie, baie ver gekom het.
“Ek is nou net op pad bed toe,” sê die ou man. “Kom, laat ek jou wys waar jy kan slaap.” Hy stap na die kombuisdeel van die vertrek en haal ’n dik wit kers uit ’n kas en druk dit in ’n diep erdeblaker op die kas. Hy loop met die kers na die brandende fakkel en kantel die kers in die vlamme om dit aan te steek. Dit voel vir Ferdinand asof die ou man die een of ander ritueel uitvoer. Hy doen alles so stadig en presies. Dan flikker die dik wit kers onafhanklik van die fakkel. Met ’n kopknik na Ferdinand beduie die ou man hy moet hom volg.
Ferdinand loop soos ’n slaapwandelaar agter hom aan. Hulle klim op met die wenteltrap, die ou man effens moeisaam – sy een hand sleep oor die reling terwyl die ander die kers dra. Die vlammetjie speel heen en weer soos hulle loop. Dalk is hy soos ’n mot wat homself gaan verskroei in die lig?

Read Full Post »

 


ISBN:0798139021
Herman Charles Bosman
Publisher:Human & Rousseau

 We read this book during secondary school and I loved these stories of “Oom Schalk Lourens”…”oom” means “uncle”… I think I should get myself this book again! I know I have one…packed away…very old copy…my dad used to go around at bookshops…when he was young…think I take after him in that way…lol! 

Herman Charles Bosman was one of South Africa’s best (yeah, I know I always call the story writers and poets the “best”…because I try to focus on the best if not the “very” best! lol)… classical story writers….read on Wiki about him… see you later…

Herman Charles Bosman (February 3, 1905 – October 14, 1951) is the South African writer widely regarded as South Africa’s greatest short story writer. He studied the works of Edgar Alan Poe and Mark Twain, and developed a style emphasizing the use of irony. His English-language works utilize primarily Afrikaner characters and point to the many contradictions of Afrikaner society in the first half of the twentieth century.

Bosman was born at Kuilsrivier, near Cape Town to an Afrikaner family, although he was raised with English as well as Afrikaans. While Bosman was still young, his family moved to Johannesburg where he went to school at Jeppe High School for Boys in Kensington. He was a contributor to the school magazine. When Bosman was sixteen, he started writing short stories for the national Sunday newspaper (the Sunday Times). He attended the University of the Witwatersrand submitting various pieces to student’s literary competitions.

Upon graduating, he accepted a teaching position in the Groot Marico district, in an Afrikaans language school. The area and the people inspired him and provided the background for all his best known short stories; the Oom Schalk Lourens series and the Voorkamer sketches. The Oom Schalk Lourens series features an older character with that name. the Voorkamer series are similarly all set in the Marico region.

During the school holidays in 1926, he returned to visit his family in Johannesburg. During an argument, he fired a rifle at his stepbrother and killed him.

Bosman was sentenced to death and moved to Death row at the Pretoria Central Prison. He was reprieved and sentenced to ten years with hard labour. In 1930, he was released on parole after serving half his sentence. His experiences formed the basis for his semi-autobiographical book, Cold Stone Jug.

He then started his own printing press company and was part of a literary set in Johannesburg, associating with poets, journalists and writers, including Aegidius Jean Blignaut. Needing a break, he then toured overseas for nine years, spending most of his time in London. The short stories that he wrote during this period formed the basis for another of his best-known books, Mafeking Road.

At the start of the Second World War, he returned to South Africa and worked as a journalist. He found the time to translate the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam into Afrikaans.
Read
HERE on Wikipedia…more about him…

Herman Charles Bosman’s best-loved stories about the Marico District are published here for the first time in the form intended by the author. This text of Mafeking Road – edited by Craig MacKenzie – is the first to appear from the original versions, with an introduction and notes on the texts.

Bosman’s storyteller figure Oom Schalk Lourens takes us into the world of the concertina-player who leaves the Marico for fame and glory; the girl who returns from finishing school to dazzle and dupe the Marico yokels; the Boer War soldier with a tragic story to tell about his son; the legendary leopard of Abjaterskop; the man who kills his wife and buries her under the dung floor of his voorkamer …

Jealousies, hatreds, loves and betrayals – the entire range of human emotions are laid bare in a manner at once humorous and satirical, romantic and ironic. Mafeking Road reveals to us a world quaint and distant … and yet powerfully familiar.

Herman Charles Bosman, who died of a heart attack in 1951, is one of South Africa’s most famous story-tellers. This is a classic collection of his short stories. As a person he had a unique way of seeing life, an intense excitement that he managed to convey in his stories. His books are pre-eminent in the field of South-African literature.
Read on THIS SITE more and you can view more books written by him in English as well as in Afrikaans.
You can order the book HERE from Kalahari.net….


Please click HERE to visit the Groot Marico on your next trip…this is HC Bosman-world…and read about Patrick Mynhardt…
Patrick Mynhardt was the Honory Life President of the HC Bosman Literary Society.

If you like this, you’d also like…

(for the witty teller of folk-tales:

-Mark Twain, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (1867) and other sketches and stories.

-Sholom Aleichem, Tevye’s Daughters, and other stories (c.1905-1916).

-O.Henry, Heart of the West (1907).

Click on THIS LINK to read more….

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

afrikaans-2

Meer Afrikaanse stories op hierdie volgende link asook boeke wat aanbeveel kan word. Die link sal in ‘n nuwe venster oopmaak.
https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/storietyd-storytime/

Hierdie stories het ek in ‘n “Zip”-lêer eendag iewers van ‘n webbladsy afgelaai, ek kan nie eers meer onthou waar nie. In elk geval, ek blog dit omdat dit kosbare stories is van een van ons fantastiese skrywers, Pieter W Grobbelaar. Geniet dit!

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

ANTJIE SOMERS

As paaiboelie het Antjie Somers geen gelyke in Afrikaans nie. “Oppas vir Antjie Somers. Hy sal jou in sy groot sak stop!” is ‘n dreigement wat baie geslagte kinders soet gehou het. “Hy”, ja, want Antjie Somers was natuurlik eintlik ‘n man. Hier volg een van die talle maniere waarop die verhaal vertel word.

Andries Somers was ‘n voorman onder die Strand se vissers. Wie kon soos hy ‘n treknet vasvat? Wie ‘n spaan met hom laat sak? Nee, niemand nie. En dapper! Waar iemand in gevaar gekom het, was Andries Somers eerste by. Nes ’n see-eend kon hy swem, en talle drenkelinge het hy land toe gebring as die ander al lankal moedverlore was.

Maar afguns is daar altyd, en skoorsoek is g’n kuns nie. Eendag op die strand pak ‘n klomp vissers hom. Andries laat nie met hom speel nie. Hulle kantel voor sy vuiste. Maar een bly te stil lê waar sy kop ‘n klip gevang het. Andries moet vlug, anders hang die mense hom dalk op. Hy kry ‘n sisrok van sy suster. Hy bind ‘n kopdoek om. Hy haak ‘n mandjie oor sy arm. Toe kies hy koers, diep na die binneland.

Op ‘n plaas agter die berge gaan verhuur hy hom. En hy werk weer soos net hy kan. Van die voordag staan hy bak tot dit laat word in die aand. Wingerd spit of pars of mis ry maak nie saak wat hulle doen nie. Andries Somers word die voorman op die plaas.

Maar die afguns het ore en ‘n storie baie tonge, en voor lank skinder die mense kliphard onder mekaar.

“Vertel ons,Andries, van die sisrok wat jy in jou huis wegbêre,” por die ene.

“En die kopdoek, Andries Somers ? Of is jou naam dalk eintlik Antjie?” pla ‘n ander.

“Antjie Somers! Antjie Somers!” koggel hulle.

Andries Somers laat sy kop sak, en hy maak of hy nie hoor nie, want naderhand kom daar weer nuwe rusie. Maar die derde dag toe kan hy hul geterg nie meer verduur nie. Daardie aand pak hy sy bondel, en hy maak dat hy daar wegkom.

Nooit weer keer Andries terug nie. Nêrens slaan sy spoor weer uit nie. Hy het soos ‘n gees verdwyn.

Maar al meer vertel die kinders wat saans teen die berg gaan hout soek van ‘n ou vrou wat hulle verjaag.

“Sy het ‘n rooi kopdoek,” sê een kind.

“Sy het ‘n sisrok met groot strepe.”

“Sy het ‘n lang mes.”

“En ‘n mandjie.”

“En ‘n streepsak oor haar skouer.”

“Sy wil ons vang en in haar sak prop!” kerm hulle.

En die grootmense skud kop. “Dit is daardie Antjie Somers,” sê hulle onder mekaar.

Andries Somers raak vergete: dapper Andries, flukse Andries, Andries wat altyd kon voorvat. Maar een storie word al luider en geslagte lank herhaal: “Antjie Somers! Antjie Somers, Antjie Somers gaan jou vang!”

————-

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

DIE HEKS VAN HEXRIVIER

Hierdie mooi, eg Afrikaanse sprokie is ‘n goeie voorbeeld van ‘n verhaal wat waarskynlik rondom die naam van ‘n bepaalde plek ontstaan het.

Elise was ‘n mooi meisie. In die hele vallei het geeneen soos sy gewoon nie. Maar ongelukkig het sy aan hoogmoed gely. As die jong mans by haar kom kuier, het sy net haar neus opgetrek en gesê: “Eendag sal die mooiste en beste en fluksste jong man my kry.”

Op ‘n dag kom Flip met sy sweetvos by die plaas aangery. Dit is goed om hom te hoor lag. Hy is mooi om na te kyk. Vir werk is hy nie bang nie. Toe weet Elise: dis die jong man vir wie sy gewag het. Maar sy is nog hoogmoedig. “Gaan pluk vir my die bloedrooi disa wat op die hoogste krans groei,” sê sy. “Dan sal ek weet dat jy my liefde werd is.”

“Ek gaan,” sê Filip.

Flip klim en klim, en soos hy klim, sing hy.

Flip klim en klim met ‘n lag.

Flip klim tot hy tussen die kranse kom. Daar ver op ‘n rotspunt wat oor die diepste afgrond hang, blom die rooi disa.

“Nou gaan ek jou pluk,” sê Flip. “My bruid wag vir my.”

Maar toe hy vooroor buk, krummel die klippe onder sy voet. Hy gryp, maar dis net die disa wat hy beetkry. Hy stort met die blom in sy hand na benede.

Toe Elise van Flip se dood hoor, breek haar hart. “Filip! Filip!” snik sy, maar dit is te laat. Filip! Filip!” huil sy, maar dit help nie meer nie. “Filip! Filip!” roep sy, en sy klim die berg in na die plek toe waar die bloedrooi disa gestaan het.

Toe sy die geknakte blomsteel sien en die spore van Filip se val, kan sy nie meer nie. Filip! Filip!” sug sy en sak inmekaar. En die afgrond gryp haar soos hy Flip gegryp het, en sy val haar te pletter.

En nou nog, vertel die mense, kan jy haar daar sien dwaal. Dis net ‘n skim wat van haar oor is. Haar geroep is ‘n suggie wind. Maar sy kan nie rus vind nie. Elke maanlignag kom sy weer om na haar Filip te soek, al sal sy hom nooit kry nie.

“Dis haar verdiende loon, sê die mense. “Haar hoogmoed het ‘n jong man se lewe gekos. Sy is ‘n heks!”

So het die mooiste jong meisie van die vallei die Heks van Hexrivier geword.

—–

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

WOLF LEER VLIEG

Wolf is moedeloos honger. Elke keer as hy by ‘n dooie dier kom, het Aasvoël lankal die lekkerste vleis afgeëet sodat net die kaal bene vir hom oorbly.

“Ai, Aasvoël,” kla Wolf, “kan jy dan nie vir my sê hoe jy so gou weet as daar iets te ete is nie?”

“Dis maklik, antwoord Aasvoël. “Ek vlieg hoog in die lug en kyk ver oor die aarde uit. Jy kan net tot by die bossies hier voor jou neus sien.”

“Leer my dan ook vlieg,” soebat Wolf.

“Goed,” sê Aasvoël. “Kom klim op my rug, dan kyk jy mooi wat ek doen.”

Aasvoël sprei sy kragtige vlerke, en Wolf meet net vasklou.

“Sien jy, Wolf?” roep Aasvoël toe hulle hoog oor ‘n lap doringbosse sweef. “Dis maklik. Spring nou af en klap met jou bene soos ek met my vlerke.”

Wolf duik deur die lug, maar hoe hy ook al skop en spartel, hy val soos ‘n klip, reg in die doringbosse.

“Eina!” tjank Wolf terwyl hy tussen die klouende takke uitsukkel.

“Laat dit vir jou ‘n les wees!” roep Aasvoël van bo af. “‘n Dier is gemaak om te loop, en ‘n voël om te vlieg. En as diere probeer vlieg, kom daar moeilikheid.”

———-

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

VAT HOM, JAKKALS!

Deur hul aanraking met mekaar, het die sprokies van die verskillende rasse so vermeng dat ‘n mens soms nie weet waar die Boesman storie ophou en die Hottentot invloed begin nie om van die invloed van wit en swart mense nie eens te praat nie. Maar die belangrikste bly die verhaal self.

i. Ryperd

Jakkals is kwaad vir Hasie, want hy het stories by vrou Jakkals gaan aandra, en nou het sy haar man die huis belet. Maar Hasie het baie planne. Op ‘n dag hoor hy Jakkals suutjies in die paadjie draf. Toe gaan lê hy in die bossies en kreun.

“Ha! nou het ek jou, Haas,” sê Jakkals, en hy wil net spring, maar Hasie antwoord met ‘n swak stem: “Vat my maar, Jakkals. Ek is te siek om te vlug. Tel my op jou rug, dan dra jy my huis toe.”

En Jakkals dink dis glad nie so ‘n slegte plan nie. Nou sal sy vrou sommer weer vir hom goed word as hy met ‘n lekker stuk haasvleis daar aankom. Jakkals laat loop in die paadjie af, en Hasie moet net klou.

Jakkals, Jakkals!” roep hy later, “Die vlieë pla baie. Pluk tog vir my ‘n taaibostakkie dat ek hulle kan wegjaag.”

“Ai, jy is lastig,” sê Jakkals, en hy gaan pluk maar.

Toe hulle nog van ver af na Jakkals se huis toe aankom, staan sy vrou al op die stoep om te kyk wat haar man hier kom soek. “Vrou, vrou!” roep Jakkals. “Ek het vir jou ‘n lekker vet haas gebring.”

Maar kyk, nou sit Hasie regop, en die pyne is skielik uit sy lyf, en die taaibostak is ‘n lat. “Vrou, vrou!” koggel hy Jakkals. “Ek het vir jou ‘n lekker vet jakkals gebring!” En die lat gesels oor Jakkals se blaaie, en Jakkals bokspring en galop. Toe wip Hasie van sy rug af en verdwyn lag lag in die bossies.

“Nee, so ‘n treurige man wil ek nie hê nie,” sê vrou Jakkals. “Waar het jy al van ‘n jakkals gehoor wat hom deur ‘n haas laat ry? Maak dat jy wegkom hier voor my oë!”

ii. Die Byekerk

Hasie hardloop na die berg se kant toe, en daar sien hy ’n bynes diep in ‘n klipskeur. “Ai!” sê Hasie:

“Lekker is lekker,

en goed is goed –

en die beste lekker

is heuningsoet!”

En Hasie druk sy kop diep in die skeur om die nes by te kom, maar hy het nie geweet dat Jakkals al weer spoorsny nie. Hy sit nog so, toe Jakkals hom aan die hakskeen gryp. “Ha! nou het ek jou, Haas,” sê Jakkals, en hy wil hom sommer sy tande laat proe.

Maar Hasie het klaar geskrik en ver gedink. “Sjuut, Jakkals,” sê hy. “Kan jy nie hoor my vriende hou kerk nie?”

“Waar?” vra Jakkals nuuskierig.

“Hier in die klipskeur,” sê Hasie. “Ai, hulle sing tog te pragtig!”

“Laat ek hoor, sê Jakkals, en hy druk sommer in. Dan trek hy sy kop weer uit en sê: “Nee wat, hulle kan nie sing nie. Dis net brom brom brom, al op dieselfde wysie.”

“Hulle is seker moeg,” sê Hasie. “Steek ‘n bietjie ‘n stok daar by die voordeur in dat hulle weet ons is hier. Dan moet jy hoor.”

En Jakkals gryp ‘n stok, en hy werskaf in die klipskeur rond, en toe druk hy sy kop in om goed te luister.

Nee kyk, dit was ‘n sonde. Die bye mors met Jakkals; hulle verniel hom; hulle steek hom byna dood. Hy spring om en hardloop, maar die bye het nie tyd nie. Dis net zoem tjiek! “Eina!” Zoem tjiek! Zoem tjiek! Zoem tjiek! “Eina! Eina! Eina!”

Hasie lê soos hy lag. Hy rol soos hy lag. Hy maak hom eintlik seer. Nee, Jakkals sal hom nie gou weer pla nie.

iii. Vat Hom, Jakkals!

Maar Hasie is glad te gerus. Sing sing in die paadjie. Wirts warts om die bossies. Kyk nie waar hy loop nie; trap nie waar hy kyk nie. Woep! daar sit hy. Jakkals het voëlent aan ‘n stomp gesmeer en dit in die paadjie neergesit. Hasie spook, maar hy sit al hoe vaster. Hy ruk en pluk en skree.

Jakkals kom tussen die bossies uit. “Ha! nou het ek jou, Haas!” sê hy. Sy lippe is nog altyd skeef geswel van die bysteke sodat dit lyk asof hy nie kan ophou lag nie.

Hasie word stil. Ja, jy het my, Jakkals,” sê hy. “Nou kan jy my maar opeet. Dis net jammer om so dorstig te sterwe. Ek was juis op pad rivier toe.”

“Nee, ons kan ‘n bietjie gaan drink,” sê Jakkals, wat hom heeltemal droëtong gehardloop het om die strik vir Hasie reg te kry. Hy pluk Hasie los van die voëllym af, gooi hom oor sy skouer en stap af na die drinkplek toe.

Ai, hoe stil en blink is die water nie. Jakkals laat sy kop sak om te drink. Maar kyk die ongeskik! Hierdie ander jakkals druk sommer sy snoet tussenin. “Gee pad!” brom Jakkals.

“Wat is dit nou, Jakkals?” vra Hasie agter sy skouer.

“Kyk self,” sê Jakkals, en hy sit hom neer. En: “Staan soontoe!” sê hy vir die ander jakkals wat hom al weer beskou.

Hasie sien dadelik dat Jakkals met sy eie weerkaatsing baklei, maar hy sê niks nie.

“Loop weg hier!” sê Jakkals vir die derde maal, en hy wys tande, maar die waterjakkals wys terug.

“Moenie so met jou laat speel nie!” roep Hasie. “Kyk hoe staan daardie ander dier se mond soos hy jou uitlag. Vat hom, Jakkals!”

Toe Jakkals gryp, gryp die ander jakkals ook. Toe Jakkals duik, is hulle doems! al twee binne in die water. Toe Jakkals verdwyn, is alles weg.

“Ha ha ha!” lag Hasie:

“Kwaai is kwaai,

en kwaai se voet:

ou Jakkals soek

sy eie bloed!”

En toe Jakkals hangstert uit die water klim, sing Hasie al ver in die paadjie af.

———

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

SOP MET ‘N SKOP

Die Boesmans het die dierewêreld fyn deurgekyk. Daarom is Leeu vir hulle die sterke, Wolf soos Hiëna dikwels genoem word ‘n wreedaard, en Jakkals ‘n lafhartige bedelaar.

Wolf het ‘n ver pad geloop om by sy broer te gaan kuier. Nou is hy honger en dors. In die veld kry hy Leeu wat aan ‘n sebra lê en eet. ‘n Entjie weg sit Jakkals vir ‘n bietjie oorskiet en wag.

“Naand, Leeu,” sê Wolf vriendelik.

“Mmm,” sê Leeu, en hy kraak ‘n murgbeen oop.

Wolf gaan op sy hurke sit. “Hoe lyk dit, nooi jy my dan nie om ‘n stukkie saam te eet nie?”

“Ja, ja!” sê Jakkals gretig.

“Bly stil!” sê Wolf, en Jakkals gee ‘n paar tree pad.

“Nee,” sê Leeu, en hy skeur aan die boud se sagte vleis.

“Net so ‘n bietjie soppies om op te lek,” vra Wolf. “Ek is baie dors.”

“Ek lek my eie sop,” sê Leeu.

“Net ‘n ou murgbeentjie om af te eet,” soebat Wolf.

“Dè, vat dan!” sê Leeu, en hy gooi vir Wolf die been wat hy nou net self droog gesuig het.

“En wat van my, Leeu ? ” vra Jakkals met ‘n huilstem.

“Trap!” sê Leeu, en hy mik met sy voorvoet.

Jakkals verskuif nog ‘n entjie verder weg.

Wolf vat die been, en hy kou daaraan asof hy tog te lekker kou, en hy suig daaraan asof daar baie te suig is. Toe staan hy op. “Baie dankie, Leeu,” sê hy. “Ek sal sulke vriendelikheid nie vergeet nie. Kom eet gerus môreaand ‘n bietjie sop by my.

“Dankie, ja,” sê Leeu, en hy lek al klaar sy lippe af, want hy weet Wolf se maats is dood as dit by sop kook kom.

“Dankie, ja!” sê Jakkals asof Wolf hom ook genooi het, en hy gaan lek die droë been af wat Wolf laat agterbly het.

Agter die bultjie kom Wolf op ‘n volstruis af. Dis net vere en voete, en toe begin Wolf weglê. Die stuk wat oorbly, sleep hy saam huis toe. “Eet julle maar die vleis, ” sê hy vir sy vrou en kinders. “Laat bly net die bene vir my.”

Die volgende dag sit Wolf twee potte op die vuur vir die volstruissop. Die een pot haal hy betyds af om koud te word, maar die ander pot hou hy kookwarm.

Dis ook nie te lank nie, of hier kom Leeu aan met Jakkals op sy spoor. “Hoe lyk dit met daardie sop waarvan jy gepraat het, Wolf?” vra Leeu.

“Ja, hoe lyk dit met die sop?” vra Jakkals.

“Kom sit maar hier in die ry,” sê Wolf, en hy beduie waar sy vrou en kinders al wag.

Vrou Wolf hou haar mond oop, en Wolf gooi in, maar dis van die koue pot s’n. So gaan hy van kind tot kind, en hulle drink tog te lekker. Maar toe hy by Leeu en Jakkals kom, skep hy twee bekers van die vuurwarm sop uit. “Maak wyd oop!” sê hy, en hulle maak so.

Toe gooi hy.

Leeu wil nog sluk, toe spu hy al dat die sop met so ‘n wye boog staan. “Sjoe, vriend Wolf,” sê hy kortasem, “maar jou sop is vandag darem kwaai.”

“Dis van ‘n volstruis se bene,” sê Wolf. “Dié voël kan mos so kwaai skop. Wil jy nog ‘n bietjie hê?”

“Nee, dankie,” sê Leeu, “ek dink ek loop maar weer.”

En Jakkals? Hy kan nie insluk nie, want dis te warm. En hy kan nie uitspu nie, want hy is te bang vir Wolf. Daarom sit hy so met die trane wat oor sy wange loop. Maar toe Leeu wegdraf, draf hy saam, en hy maak sy mond agter ‘n bossie leeg. En nou nog as Jakkals so in die maanskyn wag dat Leeu klaar moet eet, en hy dink aan daardie sop, dan begin hy sommer van nuuts af huil.

Luister maar mooi.

“Kwaai sop!” tjank Jakkals. “Volstruissop! Volstruissop met ‘n skop!”

———-

Die Mooiste Afrikaanse Sprokies

uitgesoek en oorvertel deur

PIETER W. GROBBELAAR

JAKKALS VERTROU SY EIE VREDE NIE

Op ‘n oggend snuffel Jakkals tussen ‘n klompie bome rond, toe hy Hoenderhaan op ‘n hoë tak gewaar.

“Môre, my liewe Haan,” groet hy vriendelik.

“Môre, Jakkals,” groet Haan. “En waar stap jy dié tyd van die oggend nog rond?”

“Ek soek ‘n bietjie ordentlike geselskap,” sê Jakkals vinnig. “Maar dis nie lekker om so kop in die lug te staan en praat nie. Kom sit liewers hier by my.”

“O nee,” antwoord Hoenderhaan. “Ek ken jou streke. As ek naby jou kom, eet jy my op.”

“Nog nooit nie!” roep Jakkals uit. “Het jy dan nie gehoor nie? Daar is vrede in Afrika onder al die nasies.”

“Koe-ke-le-koe!” lag Haan.

“Hoekom lag jy?” vra Jakkals.

“Nee, ek lag sommer vir al jou stories,” antwoord Haan. “En dan lag ek vir my eie storie ook.”

“Wat se storie is dit?” vra Jakkals.

“Gisteraand het Wildehond my bekruip,” vertel Haan. Toe moes ek die bome in vlug. Nou is Boer met sy honde op pad om my te soek. Ek kan hulle al sien aankom.”

“Nou ja, dan groet ek maar eers,” sê Jakkals skielik haastig.

“Hoekom wil jy al loop Jakkals?” vra Haan. “Ons gesels nou eers lekker. Jy is tog seker nie bang vir die honde nie. Daar is mos vrede in Afrika.”

“O ja,”‘ antwoord Jakkals, “maar die vraag is of die onnosele honde daarvan weet.” En hy draf vinnig weg.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »