Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Afrikaans songs’ Category

This entry is more about a new Afrikaans song by Steve Hofmeyr – he sings in English too, and if you like the voice of Neil Diamond, then you will surely like his music too. Anyway, this new Afrikaans song is a protest song and I was reading on the link, in this post, about protest songs. Afrikaans is a young language and since the start Afrikaans struggled to survive. The British settled in South Africa in 1820 and then after the South African-British War – Boer War – Afrikaans was also ‘banned’. In primary schools, if you dared to speak your mother tongue [Afrikaans], you got a board around your neck stated ‘Donkey’ on it. At the moment, Afrikaners [not Africans] again, have to fight to survive. Not just to survive as a human race, but also the language as such. Farmers get murdered on a weekly basis [don’t forget the murders in the towns and cities too.] The world is IGNORANT!
Goethe said, “There is nothing more frightening than active ignorance.”
I’ve found the lyrics to the song and also some English words to it [to part of it], but you will get the ‘message’. ‘Apartheid’ was nothing comparing to what happens now in our beautiful country. And if you really think you know everything about Apartheid, then I think you know just a tiny drop in the ocean of what it really was. Being in the UK now for long enough to know what they ‘know’ about ‘Apartheid’, is enough to tell me that they believed anything that was dished up to them as ‘Apartheid’. We all know what the ANC tried to achieve with their ‘campaigns’ and with a world full of narrow-minded people, they achieved what they wanted  including the toi-toi on Trafalgar Square in the 1980’s and their sad sing-songs in America.  Also, I think some of us know WHY things happened as it happened – like the Zimbabwean-ordeal – and it is just a matter of ‘time’ and South Africa will be there  too – then those ‘waiting’ will ‘close in’.[and I’m not referring here to ‘those’ as the Afrikaners]. During the Boer War the British found it hard to win the war… we are a nation made up from different nations. We will fight and stand up again. Ex Unitate Vires= Unity is Strength

Read more about us here:

THE BOER NATIONS

Take a community of Dutchmen of the type of those who defended
themselves for fifty years against all the power of Spain at a time
when Spain was the greatest power in the world. Intermix with them a
strain of those inflexible French Huguenots who gave up home and
fortune and left their country for ever at the time of the revocation
of the Edict of Nantes. The product must obviously be one of the most
rugged, virile, unconquerable races ever seen upon earth.  Take this
formidable people and train them for seven generations in constant
warfare against savage men and ferocious beasts, in circumstances
under which no weakling could survive, place them so that they acquire
exceptional skill with weapons and in horsemanship, give them a
country which is eminently suited to the tactics of the huntsman, the
marksman, and the rider.  Then, finally, put a finer temper upon their
military qualities by a dour fatalistic Old Testament religion and an
ardent and consuming patriotism.  Combine all these qualities and all
these impulses in one individual, and you have the modern Boer — the
most formidable antagonist who ever crossed the path of Imperial
Britain.  Our military history has largely consisted in our conflicts
with France, but Napoleon and all his veterans have never treated us
so roughly as these hard-bitten farmers with their ancient theology
and their inconveniently modern rifles. —Arthur Conan Doyle

Click THIS link to read the entire article by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), Scottish author and creator of the oft-quoted detective-hero Sherlock Holmes wrote The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1891)

On THIS LINK link, – on my blog – I said in 2007 that I hope we as a nation will – again – rise and stand together one day. Eventhough we are scattered all over the planet at the moment, I do look forward to that day when things will ‘come together’ for all of us.

What is protest music? In April 1966, Bob Dylan arrived in Stockholm as part of his controversial “electric” world tour, and a local interviewer asked him why he was no longer writing and performing protest songs. Dylan, irritated and more than a little out of it, objected to the question’s premise and called one of his new rock ’n’ roll compositions the very height of protest music: “Very, very protesty. And, uh, one of the protestiest of all things I ever protested against in my protest years.”

Please click HERE to read the entire article.

Ons Sal Dit Orleef

Ons sal dit oorleef – Steve Hofmeyr
“Daar’s ‘n land en ‘n volk in een taal gedoop
Met gebede en buskruit en bloed gekoop
Wat weer en weer van sy knie af moet streef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Uit die kake van oormag deur die vuur op ons werf
Staan die engele by ons vroue en die kinders wat sterf
Elke grafsteen een standbeeld vir die wat bly leef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

My hart klop toktokkie waar hy breek vir my volk
Voor die kakie kanon of die k****r se dolk
Dit maak nie meer saak nie waar ons ons begeef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Ek lig my oë tot die berge op
Waar sal my hulp tog vandaan kan kom
Ag my God jou woorde lê deur my geweef
Ons sal dit oorleef…

Ek staan vandag op jou plaas ou vriend
Daar hang stof oor die stilte sovêr ek kan sien
Maar die geeste van gister sal more herleef
Ons sal dit oorleef

Some of the words in English.

My heart beats toktokkie where it breaks for my people
against the English (Khaki) canons or the Kaffir’s dagger
It matters none where we now are heading
We will survive this ordeal …

I raise my eyes to the mountains
ask where will my help arrive from?
Oh my Lord your words are woven within me…
We will survive this ordeal…
English lyrics: whatishappeninginsouthafrica.blogspot

Conversation between Theodore A… and Steve on Twitter [you might want to click the image for a clear view]

Read Full Post »

This photo was taken yesterday about 4pm

The first Afrikaans Christmas song written in South Africa – about a Summer Christmas – and I’ve found a youtube video about it. It’s beautiful, the boys singing in this choir reminded me of the Drakensberg Boys Choir of years ago – beautiful singing. The translation of the song was found on the site of: openlanguages.net

Somerkersfees

[1]

Welkom o stille nag van vrede,
Onder die suiderkruis,
Wyl stemme uit die verlede
Oor sterrevelde ruis.

[2]

Hoor jy hoe sag die klokke beier
in eeue-oue taal.
Kyk, selfs die nagtelike swye
vertel die ou verhaal.

[3]

Voel jy ook nou Sy warm liefde
As ons die dag gedenk,
Toe Hy sy Seun aan ons gegee het –
Ons grootste Kersgeskenk.

KOOR

Kersfees kom, Kersfees kom –
Gee aan God die eer.
Skenk ons ‘n helder Somerkersfees
In hierdie land, o Heer.

English-version

[1]

Enter in quiet peace filled night
beneath the Southern Cross
Lend now your ear this starlit night,
to whispers from the past.

[2]

Do you hear how softly the bells
are chiming, in ancient dialect
Even the evening’s starry silence,
on prescious history reflects.

[3]

Can you also feel the warmth of His love,
as we celebrate the day
God loved us so much He sent his son,
no other gift as great.

CHORUS

Christmas nears, Christmas nears
Bow before the King
Grant by Your grace in this great land
A bright summer’s Christmas Lord.

This next video is for everyone reading here and I do hope your Christmas will be a wonderful Christmas.
I want you also to think about South Africans and pray for my country and its people, you can see photos of how black kids are being trained how to kill/execute whites- and best of all, the WORLD is turning a BLIND eye. If it was whites killing blacks, it would be DIFFERENT story, but who cares, it’s blacks killing whites, even a three year old girl! I won’t go into the detail how she was killed as you won’t believe it. Read the link to know what is REALLY going on in South Africa. The British screwed up big time – with Zimbabwe and they screwed up ONCE again – not just the British, but America too – this time. And …oh please, don’t come to me with your Apartheid excuses, as Apartheid was nothing like this and has nothing to do with this – 1994 is …er…how many years ago? Using Apartheid as an excuse also shows how uninformed you actually are about South Africa and its past – as that’s the only thing most people know about – well, actually those who know something about South Africa – apart from lions and rhinos roaming the streets/cities of our country – like some people think. So, I would suggest to read the link if that was going to be your excuse too.  These people are demon possessed and they do not know about God and the love of God and Jesus. They need your prayers too and they need people to spread the love of God, so they can stop with their killings. If you are interested in more reading, follow the link on my sidebar – with the photo of Anthony LoBaido – to read more.

Read Full Post »

image:woes.co.za

South African sunsets [African sunsets in general] are the most beautiful sunsets I’ve ever seen. This next song’s title is Suncatcher – translated as it is an Afrikaans song – Sonvanger. –one of the most beautiful Afrikaans songs. I translated the song in 2008 – see lyrics at the bottom of this post – and Laurika Rauch [female singer in the video – also a household name in SA] was quite impressed with my translation, therefore I’m happy to post it here for you –

Suncatcher

See if you could catch me the sun
There’s a room in the house where it can be hung
It’s dark by the window in the middle of the day
Do you remember how brightly the room could laugh?

See if you could bring me the sun
There’s a song in the corridors the sun can sing
Coz it’s quiet in the corners, this cold season
Can you see what the wind and rain do to me?

Chorus
S-u-ncatcher!
I ask you, please, let it shine for me again
S-u-ncatcher!
Let me understand
How a summer disappear like that in the nothingness
And let it shine

See if you could get me the sun
There’s a home in my heart where the sun can live
See if you could steal me the sun
There’s a place in the garden where the sun can play

Chorus
S-u-ncatcher!
I ask you please, let it shine for me again
S-u-ncatcher!
Let me understand
How a summer could disappear like that in the nothingness
And let it shine

Bring some light for the meanders on my road
And a handful of rays for the darkness in my heart

~~~ Nikita…2008

This piece of art is called Die Sonvanger by Edward Baird – the picasaweb-link is at the bottom of the image – click for a larger view.

Ansie-Ans from devianart says her dad took this pic of her in Cape Town. A very beautiful picture!

Read Full Post »

 

Tomorrow, 14th August, is an important day in the history of Afrikaans. On the 14th August 1875, an organization was founded to promote Afrikaans as a language. The language Afrikaans has its roots in seventeenth century Dutch but it has been influenced by many languages including: English, Malay, German, Portuguese, French and some African languages. Some of the first written work in Afrikaans was done using the Arabic alphabet in the work Bayaan-ud-djyn written by Abu Bakr. Apart from this development and minor writings in so-called Cape Dutch Afrikaans acted mainly as a spoken language for people living in the Cape and Dutch was used as the formal and written language. Afrikaans is a language spoken by many people of different races and ethnic groups throughout Southern Africa. I have decided to contribute something every year on this day [ or as near as possible to this date] to the celebration of Afrikaans as a beautiful language spoken by beautiful people. This first poem is my contribution and the second a poem from one of our famous poets. Both poems’ titles are Die Beste which means The Best.  Then you can read my 2008-contribution: Afrikaans and the last poem is my 2009-contribution.  The Afrikaans song’s title is Sypaadjie Mense [you can read the translation on the given link at the 3rd poem where you can listen to the song and follow the words in English.] –Sidewalk People. Afrikaans readers: the poem at the bottom is my contribution of last year. When I was at Primary School, we always had to learn poems and from Die Beste I had to know the first two stanzas by heart when I was 11 years of age. I must say I don’t regret it!

You can see photos of the Afrikaans Language Monument – the only language monument in the world! – and an explanation/meaning of the monument.

Die Beste

Afrikaans:

Ek is aan jou verknog
Jy is vir my ‘n sieraad
Jou wingerdstokke groei welig
in my opgeploegde land
Jy is besprinkeld met
onbeskaamde liefde en
jy bring voort troetelkinders
Jou sprekers strek
van die Ooste na die Weste
en jy bly verreweg
Die Beste!
-21:30 Nikita

The Best
Afrikaans
I’m attached to you!
To me you are a trinket
Your grapevines flourish
In my ploughed land
You’ve been irrigated with
Impudent love
You bear cuddly-children
Your speakers stretch
From the East to the West
And by far:
You’re the BEST
-(c) Translated: 16/2/2012 Nikita – 20:00

[Translated for friends to understand the Afrikaans poem!]

Image: farms-for-sale.co.za

Die Beste

Geil lusern in die laagste landjie;
Geil groen blare en blomme blou;
Aalwyn rooi op die voorste randjie,
Rooi soos bloed teen die rotse grou;
Somer en son en saffier daarbowe;
Ruik van die keurbos rondgesprei;
Kort klein skadu’s oor die klowe;
Somer en son en saffier vir my!
Wonder van kleure uitgesprei –
Wat is daar meer deur die dood te rowe?
Somer en son en saffier vir my!

Hoog oor die water skommel die vinkies,
Vol van die vreug van die somerdag;
Bly die gekwetter van bruin tinktinkies;
Blyer die son wat goudgeel lag.
Algar wat lewe, algar tevrede,
Hoog op die heuwel en laag op die vlei;
So was dit gister, en so is dit hede –
Somer en son en saffier vir my!
Heer, wat die hemel oor my sprei,
Dit is my eerste en laaste bede:
“Somer en son en saffier vir my!”

Het jy ’n vrind wat jou hand kan vashou?
Vrinde vergaan en faal in nood!
Het jy ’n vyand, jou grootste las nou?
Vyande, vrinde gaan algar dood!
Wat’s dit vir my as die gras vergrys word?
Somer sal kom met sy groen daarby;
Wat as in winter die water ys word?
Somer en son en saffier sal bly.
Boetie, ek vra jou, wat sê jy?
Wat’s dit vir ons as die gras vergrys word?
Somer en son en saffier sal bly.

Roem van mense, rykdomme, pragte –
Alles vergaan soos die mis op die vlei:
Sterre wat skiet in pikdonker nagte,
Het langer lewe as roem kan kry.
Boetie, as ons nou ’n keus moet wae,
Hier op die wêreld, wat vra jy?
Roemryke lewe en lengte van dae?
Somer en son en saffier vir my!
Boetie, as jy nou jou keus kan kry,
Wat is die wens wat jou hart sal wae? –
Somer en son en saffier vir my!

C. Louis Leipoldt (1880-1947)

 Afrikaans
Die taal wat ek liefhet
Afrikaans
Die taal wat ek praat
Afrikaans
Die taal waarin ek dink
Afrikaans
Die taal waarin ek droom
Afrikaans
Die taal van my hart


Afrikaans

 Die taal wat ek koester
Vir nou en altyd
Afrikaans
Jy is myne
Afrikaans
Jy is nou
Afrikaans
Jy is besonders
Afrikaans
Jy is uniek
Afrikaans
Jy is getrou
Afrikaans:
My denke
My wese
My lewe!

Nikita –

Suid-Afrika: my land

Jy’s indrukwekkend, manjifiek
jou sondeurdrenkte landskappe
weerkaats helder beelde in my siel
jou pragtige wonders flikker oneindig
lank in die stilte van jou nagrus

Mount Aux Sources – so elegant en grasieus
verrys jy vanuit die voetheuwels, soos
‘n fakkel by die Spele ets jy lekkende
beelde teen die muur van my geheue
en voel ek jou hitte gloeiend teen my hart

O Blyde! ek fantaseer oor jou
magiese kragte wat jy sorgloos
en galant in die galery van my
stille gemoed stilletjies uitpak terwyl
my dawerende applous eggo
oor die velde van my gedagtes

Moederstad! hoe inskiklik laat jy my
telkens hakkel wanneer ek my herinneringe
sagkens koester – jou fasades!
waar ek jou gambiet betree
en gewillig my pionne oorgee

En saans voel ek jou fluweelagtige
skoonheid van elke sonsondergang
stadig neerdaal in my gemoed terwyl
ek stadig drink van jou geloofs-fonteine
wat borrellend bruis in oorvloed

Fragmentaries vier ek feeste
ek dans en omhels jou en jy –
jy blus my gees telkens met jou
magiese heildronke: een-vir-een
op ‘n toekoms – wat mag wees!
–Nikita –14/8/09 14:00
https://chessaleeinlondon.wordpress.com/2009/08/14/afrikaans-afrikaans-afrikaans/


The Afrikaans Language Monument (Afrikaans: Afrikaanse Taalmonument) is located on a hill overlooking Paarl. Its outline is visible from a considerable distance.

This is the only language monument in the world and was completed in 1975. The design represents the growth and developement of Afrikaans and recognises its roots which is spread over three continents – Africa, Asia and Europe. The three colums on the left that are close together (A) represents the influences of the three Western languages on Afrikaans – Dutch, French and English. The wall on the steps (B) represents the Malayan language and culture. Architect Jan van Wijk was inspired by words of prominent Afrikaans authors N.P. van Wyk Louw and C.J. Langenhoven. The “roof” (C) refers to Van Wyk Louw’s words: “Afrikaans is the language that connects Western Europe and Africa… It forms a bridge between the large, shining West and the magical Africa…”

The main column (D) which is 57 m high, represents the growth, evolution and achievement of Afrikaans and was inspired by a quote from Langenhoven: “If we plant a row of poles down this hall now, ten poles, to represent the last ten years, and on each pole we make a mark at a height from the floor corresponding to the relative written use of Afrikaans in the respective year, and we draw a line, from the first here near the floor to the last over there against the loft, then the line would describe a rapidly rising arc…”

The last column (E) symbolises the Republic of South Africa which was the birthplace of Afrikaans. On the photo below, the three round shapes symbolises the contribution of the African languages – Xhosa, Zulu and Sotho.

http://www.what-to-do-in-cape-town.com/afrikaans-language-monument.html

This song is a mix of Afrikaans and Netherlands. Stef Bos [from Holland] and Amanda Strydom [South Africa] sing the song: Die Taal van my hartThe language of my heart

Read Full Post »

SA mosaic

Please click on this mosaic to see a clearer view of these beautiful images

English readers: This is sort of a poem, but more thoughts. It is about South Africa. I dedicated 14th Aug. 2008 to Afrikaans, the language I love and my mother tongue. This day in our history used to be an important day as we celebrated Afrikaans as our language – which  was also forbidden to use by Afrikaans speaking people in the Cape when the English occupied the Cape. Sign boards/tags were hung around kids’ necks in schools saying “donkey” if they had dared speaking Afrikaans – their mother tongue.  On 14th August 1875 the GRA was founded, their task was to promote Afrikaans mainly. They also requested – on the 24th August 1878 – for the Bible to be translated into Afrikaans.  I have decided to try writing a poem or even if it is like this one, only a few words/thoughts put together, every year on this day to celebrate my language. In my poem I refer to some places and nature, all you will find in the mosaic.  On the link of my 2008-entry, you can see the Afrikaans Language Monument, very impressive! Good news for Afrikaans too: WordPress and Facebook have gone Afrikaans! If you choose Afrikaans as your language in the settings in WordPress, you will find most terms on your dashboard in Afrikaans. Great, WordPress, well done!  ‘one small step for mankind, but a giant leap for WordPress’

Was dit Hoogenhout wat in ‘n gedig gesê het:

“Engels! Engels! Alles Engels! Engels wat jy sien en hoor;
In ons skole, in ons kerke, word ons moedertaal vermoor.
Ag, hoe word ons volk verbaster, daartoe werk ons leraars saam.
Hollands nog in seek’re skole: is bedrog, ‘n blote naam!
Wie hom nie laat anglisere, word geskolde en gesmaad.
Tot in Vrystaat en Transvaal al, oweral dieselfde kwaad.
‘Dis vooruitgang’, roep die skreeuwers, ‘dis beskawing wat nou kom!
Die wat dit nie wil gelowe, die is ouderwets en dom…’.”
the poet said… “English! English! All is English! What you see and hear

In our schools, in our churches, our Mother tongue is killed”

 I’ve been to a few countries and many places in the UK. I still think South Africa is the most beautiful place in the world. We have such an aboundance of beauty and  diversity in nature. We have the greenest canyon in the world- which is also the 3rd largest in the world, we have the highest waterfall in Africa and the 2nd highest in the world, the 3rd longest Tufa waterfall , the deepest mines, the largest zoo, the smallest butterfly, the largest diamond, the second largest amount of windmills on farms (280 000), the largest impact crater on earth, white lions, the largest ostrich population…wow…I think that’s enough for now…phew, I’m out of breath, but I have to add my favourite place  The Drakensberg Mountains and on this link you can read about my hiking trip in the Mountain when I was 15. I was on top of Mount Aux Sources, the highest peak of the mountain range in South Africa. The actual highest peak of this mountain range is in Lesotho and the peak is called, Thaba Ntlenyana (which means: beautiful little mountain). “Thaba” means “mountain” – the attributive “yana” means “little”. You can see a pic of one of the two chain ladders you have to go on to reach the summit. There is also a movie for you to enjoy. At the bottom of this post I have encluded an Afrikaans song by the Art teacher in my Secondary school.- the first song – He was one of the two teachers on our hiking trip! He sings about “sidewalk people” and I’ve translated it roughly for you to understand. Please take a listen to the melody and follow the words in English.  The second song is by Sonja Herholdt and the third by Herman Haultzhausen. Their songs tie in well with my entry, only if you know Afrikaans you would understand why I say this. Sonja sings about a loved one she’s missing and longing for and Herman’s song is about the Transkaroo Train and he wants the train to bring “her” home, back to him. The Transkaroo train runs between Cape Town and Jo’burg. (Jozi) Lastly, I have some beautiful art by a South African artist..Hanlie Kotze. She likes to combine her art with poetry and I’ve posted  English ones for you too. Her link is at the bottom of this entry.

More interesting facts…

*Pretoria has the second largest number of embassies in the world after Washington, D.C.
*The University of South Africa – UNISA – is a pioneer of tertiary distance education and is the largest international correspondence university in the world with 250,000 students.
*Afrikaans is the youngest official language in the world.
*The Singita Private Game Reserve in the Kruger National Park was voted the best hotel in the world by the readers of travel publication, Conde Nast Traveller.
*Stellenbosch University was the first university in the world to design and launch a microsatellite.
*South Africa houses one of the three largest telescopes in the world at Sutherland in the Karoo.

and…South Africa is the first country to host a Fide rated Chess tournament where players from different countries played their games online! See my entry about the South African Open Chess Championships that took place in Cape Town.
Read
HERE my post dedicated to Afrikaans only- last year 14th August. Beautiful images to see and my Afrikaans poem to read too.

Afrikaanse Patriot

This stamp was issued October 1975. It was issued on the Inauguration of the Afrikaans Language Monument  and features the 1st edition of the Arikaanse Partiot (January 15, 1876), one of the first newspapers in Afrikaans rather than Dutch.
On this link you can see more stamps of South Africa.

Met die stigting van die Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners op 14 Augustus 1875 in die Paarl is ‘n tydvak van georganiseerde stryd om die Afrikaanse taal ingelui. In artikel IX van die Genootskap se bepalings word beoog om ‘n Afrikaanse maandblad uit te gee. Op hierdie dag in 1876 verskyn die eerste uitgawe van die maandblad Die Afrikaanse Patriot, wat die orgaan van die GRA sou wees. C.P. Hoogenhout was die eerste redakteur onder die skuilnaam Oom Lokomotief, wat deur die redakteurs na hom oorgeneem is. In Die Patriot dek die GRA die terreine van hul doelstelling, naamlik die van land, volk en taal. Daarin is leiding gegee ten opsigte van landsake, die Afrikaanse taal, geskiedenis en belangrike nuus. —lees meer op die link!

Suid-Afrika: my land

Jy’s indrukwekkend, manjifiek
jou sondeurdrenkte landskappe
weerkaats helder beelde in my siel
jou pragtige wonders flikker oneindig
lank in die stilte van jou nagrus

Mount Aux Sources – so elegant en grasieus
verrys jy vanuit die voetheuwels, soos
‘n fakkel by die Spele ets jy lekkende
beelde teen die muur van my geheue
en voel ek jou hitte gloeiend teen my hart

O Blyde! ek fantaseer oor jou
magiese kragte wat jy sorgloos
en galant in die galery van my
stille gemoed stilletjies uitpak terwyl
my dawerende applous eggo
oor die velde van my gedagtes

Moederstad! hoe inskiklik laat jy my
telkens hakkel wanneer ek my herinneringe
sagkens koester – jou fasades!
waar ek jou gambiet betree
en gewillig my pionne oorgee

En saans voel ek jou fluweelagtige
skoonheid van elke sonsondergang
stadig neerdaal in my gemoed terwyl
ek stadig drink van jou geloofs-fonteine
wat borrellend bruis in oorvloed

Fragmentaries vier ek feeste
ek dans en omhels jou en jy –
jy blus my gees telkens met jou
magiese heildronke: een-vir-een
op ‘n toekoms – wat mag wees!
–Nikita –14/8/09 14:00

Geniet die liedjie van Johan van der Watt: Sypaadjie Mense – Hy was een van die Onderwysers wat saam met ons groep kinders die Drakensberge gaan klim het! Hy was die kunsonnie op Hoërskool – ‘n fantastiese kunstenaar! Hy het ‘n sanggroep gehad – Lidani – toe ek op skool was. Ek is nou nie iemand met ‘n koor-stem, maar ek is stapelgek  oor kinderkoor-musiek!  Hy het die Laeveld plat getoer met Lidani en ek wil my verstout om te sê dat hulle ‘n keer in Pretoria ook gaan optree het.

sidewalk people

Sidewalk People

Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move like shadows in the street past me
Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move faceless past my heart

Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move like shadows in the street past me
Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move faceless past my heart

I wish I could look at a photo
to see what your world deep inside is like
borrow a piece of your dreams
I wonder who you are

I wish I could understand the language
in which you channelled your thoughts
I wish I could for a moment
share your path of life

Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move like shadows in the street past me
Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move faceless past my heart

perhaps it’s best for sure
‘cos if we know all of all
the sadness maybe
too hard too much
the love too beautiful

walk past one another
I stay I and you stay you
a single road leading somewhere
I wish I could understand

Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move like shadows in the street past me
Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move faceless past my heart

Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move like shadows in the street past me
Sidewalk People Sidewalk People
Move faceless past my heart

—translated–nikita

Sypaadjie Mense

Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg soos skimme in die straat verby
Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg gesigloos voor my hart verby

Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg soos skimme in die straat verby
Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg gesigloos voor my hart verby

ek wens ek kon ‘n kiekie kyk
hoe jou wêreld diep daar binne lyk
‘n stukkie van jou drome leen
ek wonder wie jy is

ek wens ek kon die taal verstaan
waarin jy jou gedagtes baan
ek wens ek kon ‘n oomblikkie
jou lewenspaadjie deel

Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg soos skimme in die straat verby
Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg gesigloos voor my hart verby

miskien is dit dalk beter so
want as ons iets van almal weet
die hartseer dalk te swaar te veel
die liefde dalk te mooi

stap maar bymekaar verby
ek bly ek en jy bly jy
‘n enkelpaadjie iewers heen
ek wens ek kon verstaan

Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg soos skimme in die straat verby
Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg gesigloos voor my hart verby

Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg soos skimme in die straat verby
Sypaadjie mense Sypaadjie mense
Beweeg gesigloos voor my hart verby


Sonja Herholdt, Ek verlang na jou…mmmm…soos ek na my land verlang.

Herman Holtzhausen – Transkaroo

Hanlie Kotze 02

Hanlie Kotze 03

Hanlie Kotze 04

Hanlie Kotze 01
For more art of Hanlie Kotze please follow the link which will open in a new window.
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

De Huisgenoot

Huisgenoot

This entry is like scrambled eggs! ..some English..some Afrikaans… some reading…some listening…some chess, some poetry, make your pick and choose what you want to do…and I hope you find something good here….I’m going to explain in short what the magazine is about. This is a South African family magazine, since the 1900’s and I’ve blogged about it before, but want to blog more and focus more on poetry that was published in these issues and about the fashion of the time and whatever you’ll find here…it’s really a mix! The three issues are in this post as PDF files if you want to download it and my other entry is only in  English, if you want to click on the link to read the English-entry posted in 2007.

You will find a poem by Goethe.. The Fisherman…translated in Afrikaans in 1915/6 – by someone. The poet’s name was unfortunately not published, only initials, at least it said that the poem was translated from the German-poem. The poems in this entry are written in Afrikaans, but Afrikaans was still busy developing and you will spot the similarities to the Dutch Language in the words/phrases. By looking at these images you can get a pretty good idea of what the fashion of the time was like, the captions with the images will also guide you and you’ve thought that my blog is a chess blog only…hehe..actually, my blog says…anything/everything and chess! But as always, I will try and link something in my entry to chess, if possible! So…here it goes…some extracts of sites – links which you can follow too – that tells us that chess was a game that was enjoyed by South Africans too…from early years on….and for those of you who want to listen so some beautiful Afrikaans music…there’s a song for you to listen to…called..”Korreltjie Sand” – (grain of sand), the poem of Ingrid Jonker…as sung by Chris Chameleon.
The following three links are pdf’s which you can download and it’s old Huisgenoot-mags. All the links will open in a new window. These files are quite large, they do take a few seconds to download. Wees geduldig!
huisgenoot-julie-1916

huisgenoot-junie-1916

huisgenoot-mei-1916

This  link is from my blogwhere I’ve previously posted in English about Ingrid Jonker with external links you can enjoy. She comitted suicide by walking into the sea.

 By downloading the pdf-format of the old Huisgenoot issues, you can compare the covers which is interesting to see how much it’s changed. Even the format has changed over the years from a quite larger format to what it is now.

At the bottom of this link, – for people who want to do some “listening” only…there are some music files…some music from the good old “past”…I know the South Africans reading here – especially if you’re not “at home” – will appreciate these songs… and if you want to download the songs in a zip folder, go to this blog and voila! music-a-la-in-a-jiffy…or is it in a “zip”-py! For English “foreigners” reading here…”Rabbit” was one of South Africa’s rock band of the mid 70’s and they had a big hit…”Charlie”…read about Trevor Rabin…one member of the band…and why he’s now in Hollywood! You can listen to Charlie too…and a few other brilliant songs…all by Saffa-artists. Do enjoy! The first song at the bottom of this post, is an Afrikaans love song though..so go on, play it for your girl friend/boy friend…the title of the song…something like..”Are you still thinking of me”?

If you can’t read the following paragraph…it is Afrikaans!  Ek het in Sept 2007 ‘n blog-inskrywing gemaak oor die 1916-Huisgenoot en hier sal jy ook die skakel kry na Tukkies waar ek die Huisgenoot-publikasies gekry het. Dit is in PDF-formaat en die skakels sal in ‘n nuwe bladsy oopmaak. Elkeen van die publikasies is sowat 8 MB en neem ‘n paar sekondes om af te laai en oop te maak. Wees maar bietjie geduldig. Daar is nog ‘n paar gediggies vanuit hierdie toeka-se-dae-uitgawes wat ek sal byvoeg met die tyd. Ek hoop julle geniet die musiek hier ook!

Chess played in South Africa in the early years:
Organised club league chess is over 100 years old in Cape Town. Cape Town chess club, the oldest in South Africa (founded in 1885) together with Woodstock, Tokai and the YMCA club formed a union of clubs in 1907. Each club entered one team in the league at a fee of 1 pound-1-0 per team in the same year.
Teams of five competed in the inaugural competition. Cape Town was expected to win and did so but only by one point. In the double round robin they scored 10 match points, Woodstock 9, YMCA 6 and Tokai 0. Cape Town sensationally lost in the opening round to Woodstock, a club barely a year old, and had to field to their strongest possible team for the replay which they won by a single point. Source: Chess for all. The link will open in a new window.
Some Chess records …about South Africa…
Longest running correspondence chess rivalry. Reinhart Straszacker and Hendrick van Huyssteen, both of South Africa, played their first game of correspondence chess in 1946. They played for over 53 years, until Straszacker died in 1999. They played 112 games, with both men winning 56 games each. Source…
https://www.chess.com/article/view/records-in-chess
The Chessmaster Borislav Kosti toured South Africa in the 1920’s. I’ve lost my original link about him, but  found another link…just after his image…and here’s a wiki-link too..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borislav_Kosti%C4%87

Bora (Borislav) Kosti a Chess Grandmaster of the 1920’s

http://www.chess.vrsac.com/vrsac/BoraKosticE.asp

Bora Kostic was born on 24 February 1887 in Vrsac. His first chess steps he started when he was ten, and as early as he was in grammar school he was one of the best chess-players in Vrsac. His biggest competitor from the grammar school days was five years older, Sava Gerdec, who taught him the chess theory. Their fight for the chess reputation was finished when Kostic went to study to Budapest. He finished Oriental trade academy there, but without neglecting chess.
His first great chess result was achieved in Budapest 1909, when he won at the tournament of the greatest Hungarian chess amateurs. This victory opened the door of the Vienna chess society to young Kostic, and that was the chess metropolis of that time.

In 1911 he achieved sensational victory in the match with the American champion, Frank Marshall. His first real “baptism of fire” Bora Kostic had that same year at the International grand master tournament Karsbad (Karlove Vari). In extraordinarily strong competition he won the title of the international master. Then followed the visit to Nordic countries where he won over the champions of Danmark and Sweden, as well as the very powerful Rudolf Spielmann.

In 1913 he moved to the capital of Argentina, Buenos Aires where he worked as the chess lecturer at the Military academy. He had been cruising on one Argetine warship across many seas. In Argentina he won in the matches with all their best players, and also the champion of this country, Roland Ilja, 6:0.

In 1915 he went to New York and started the chess tour from the east to the west coast. On that famous six-month-long tour, Bora Kostic achieved the world record in the number of played games on simultaneous exhibitions. Out of 3281played games he lost only 112, and made draw in 237. During his stay in America he visited Nikola Tesla, while he was the chess teacher to the famous tenor singer Enrico Caruso.Playing numerous games and tournaments, master tournament of the “Manhattan chess” club being the most famous in 1918, Bora Kostic was ranked immediately after Capablanca on the whole American continent. Especially because their four games played at two tournaments ended draw. That was why their match in 1919 happened, when the genius Capablanca won with the great result.

In the same year he returned to Europe and in Hastings took the second place after Capablanca. The next year in Hastings he took the first place with 100% gained points, which nobody repeated during the long tradition of this tournament. Then came important tournament results: Gothenburg 1920 – IV place, Budapest 1921 – III-IV place, Hague 1921 IV-V place. In England he played simultaneous games and blind productions, animating the chess world with enthusiasm.

In Yugoslavia of that time the rivalry between dr Milan Vidmar and Bora Kostic was evident. Unfortunately, the match, the result of which should have shown who should have been given the title of the Yugoslav champion, was never organized.

Bora Kostic especially liked to travel and see new countries and customs, but also to play at the chess tournaments during those travels. So he organized world chess tour which lasted from 11 November 1923 to 28 May 1926. As he himself said to his friend Kosta Jovanovic immediately before the trip: “I want to see the world, those parts of the world that were only the objects of my imagination. I believe that on that trip there will be a lot of interest for chess. ” That was the mission which brought commercial success of great scale to the world chess. Certain Yugoslav master, demonstrating chess on, so to speak every step, in different countries, talks about his homeland about which many people have never even heard before. First he set off to Australia and New Zealand. Then over South Africa overland to Kenia, where the famous match on the equator was played. Bora Kostic was on the northern hemisphere, and his opponent on the south. His next stop was India, where he was at the end met by maharaja from Patiale (Schandagar), who organized tournaments on the hights of the Himalayas. From there he went to Nepal and on Tibet, and then to the island of Java in Indonesia. From Java he crossed to Sumatra where he played with the chief of the Bataki tribe. From there he moved to the Philipines, and then to Hong Kong and China. From China he moved to the Soviet Union from where his return to Vrsac began. Through Siberia, over Irkutsk, Novosibirsk, Omsk, Sverdlovsk, Moskow, Odessa, Leningrad to Riga. Everywhere he played simultaneous matches, blind games, matches, and as he himself confessed the greatest number of lost games he had, were played just in the Soviet Union. Finally, at the end of May 1926, he arrived to Vrsac and ended the first part of his trip around the world at the chess-board. Tireless chess traveller, he put foundations for the future chess links among the peoples of the whole world. …

First chess Olympics were played in 1927. godine. Bora Kostic played at the first board of the Yugoslav representation and won 8,5 points out of 15 games. The following year he won in Trencanske Toplice, and in 1930 he was IV in Nice. In the same year he continued his trip around the world. He went to Mexico where he stayed eight months. From there he went to Cuba, then to America, and came back from there in the middle of 1931 to arrive to the Olympics which took place in Prague. On that Olympics Yugosalvia was IV, the contribution of Bora Kostic on the third board was very important.Then came extraordinarily strong tournament in Bled , which was marked by the world champion Alekhin.

The first Yugoslav championships took place in 1935 in Belgrade. Bora Kostic shared the first place with Vasja Pirc. Bora Kostic achieved the greatest tournament result in 1938 in Ljubljana at the Yugoslav championships. With 10,5 points out of 15 games he won over the best Yugoslav players, as well as over Szabo, Tartakower and Steiner.

At the beginning of World War II the chess activity stopped for all those who did not want to play in Nazi Germany. Among them was also Bora Kostic who spent some time in the concentration camp in Veliki Beckerek (Zrenjanin) because of his patriotism. After the war he took part at several championships and smaller tournaments, and the last competition at which he won was the tournament of veterans – Zurich 1962.

Bora Kostic died in Belgrade, 3 November 1963. Perhaps, when we take into consideration only the objective power of some players, Uncle Bora would not be ranked in the world top. It may happen that his rich talent has worn out on his road filled with all kinds of events. The circumstances he lived under later did not allow him to fullfill his creative potentials to their full extent. However, as the chess-player he was a unique, extraordinary person. He devoted his life to chess and he was thrilled with it to the end of his life.The magic of the chess game took him to the great life adventure – to the long journey through the exotic, in that time unknown world. Source: See the link  by his photo- it will open in a new window. You can play through his games on the link too.

Beauty products

Vrouens: Skoonheidsorg produkte/Women: Beauty products

Necklines and hairstyles

Mode : Neklyne en haarstyle / Fashion: Necklines and hairstyles

Girl's dress

Girl's dress

Married-couple

Marriage-couple

Mode/Fashion

Mode/Fashion

Modes van 1916/Fashion 1916

Modes van 1916/Fashion 1916

Akteurs/Actors

Akteurs/Actors

Chris Chameleon singing “Korreltjie Sand” – (Grain of Sand)

Korreltjie Sand – lyrics

korreltjie korreltjie sand
klippie gerol in my hand
klippie gesteek in my sak
word korreltjie klein en plat
sonnetjie groot in die blou
ek maak net ‘n ogie van jou
blink in my korreltjie klippie
dit is genoeg vir die rukkie

pyltjie geveer en verskiet
liefde verklein in die niet
timmerman bou aan ‘n kis
ek maak my gereed vir die niks
korreltjie klein is my woord
korreltjie niks is my dood
korreltjie klein
korreltjie sand

kindjie wat skreeu uit die skoot
niks in die wêreld is groot
stilletjies lag nou en praat
stilte in doodloopstraat
wêreldjie rond en aardblou
korreltjie maak ek van jou
huisie met deur en twee skrefies
tuintjie met blou madeliefies

pyltjie geveer en verskiet
liefde verklein in die niet
timmerman bou aan ‘n kis
ek maak my gereed vir die niks
korreltjie klein is my woord
korreltjie niks is my dood
korreltjie klein
korreltjie sand (5x)

You can read about Chris Chameleon on this link which will open in a new link.

The Original poem

Korreltjie niks is my dood
Ingrid Jonker (1933-1965)

Korreltjie korreltjie sand
klippie gerol in my hand
klippie gesteek in my sak
word korreltjie klein en plat

Sonnetjie groot in die blou
korreltjie maak ek van jou
blink in my korreltjie klippie
dit is genoeg vir die rukkie

Kindjie wat skreeu uit die skoot
niks in die wêreld is groot
stilletjies lag nou en praat
stilte in doodloopstraat

Wêreldjie rond en aardblou
ek maak net ‘n ogie van jou
huisie met deur en twee skrefies
tuintjie met blou madeliefies

Pyltjie geveer in verskiet
liefde verklein in die niet
Timmerman bou aan ‘n kis
Ek maak my gereed vir die niks

Korreltjie klein is my woord
Korreltjie niks is my dood



Kontras
Wit is die wêreld,
wit van die sneeuw.
Bokant die water
sweef daar ‘n meeuw;
blouw is die hemel,
nergens ‘n wolk:
oral is daar vrede
rondom die kolk.

Spierwitte wêreld,
diep in jouw siel
sug jij en smag jij
om te verniel;
skijn is jouw vrede,
donker jouw hart:
jij is maar blij oor
ander se smart

A D Keet: Amsterdam, Kersmis 1914

Digter Is Hij

Digter is hij, die digters-taal
Diep uit die grond van sijn hart kan haal;
En hij voel in sijn hart ‘n heerlike drang
Om ‘n vlugtige stemming in woorde te vang.

Digter is hij, die verse maak–
Verse, wat duisende harte kan raak.
Maar hij weet nie, waar hij die mag van haal:
Dis ‘n gawe, wat bo uit die hemel daal.

Digter is hij, die oog en oor
Tref met ‘n pragtige woordekoor;
En hij skep sijn lied soos ‘n vooltjie vrij,
Die sijn hele siel aan die wêreld belij.

Digter is hij, die sing en sing,
Fraai als ‘n vooltjie, wat vreugde bring:
Want hij hef sijn stem op ‘n lieflike maat
Van die môre vroeg tot die awend laat.

Digter is hij, die deur en deur
Voel, wat rondom en in hom gebeur;
Die sijn siel se gevoelens uit kan giet
In ‘n lewende, sprekende, roerende lied.

A D Keet

Wagter op die Toring

I
(Januarie 1913)
Wagter op die toring,
sê, wat sien jij daar?
Ek sien duisend-duisendtalle
voor die gragte, voor die walle,
om die vesting aan te val.
Maar geen grag sal hul oor steek nie,
en geen poort sal hul deur breek nie,
want die burgers op die mure
staan getrouw en pal.

Wagter op die toring,
sê, is daar gevaar?
Is eie strijd dan uitgestrede,
dat die vijandsvlag in vrede
oor ons eie vesting waai?
Ag! die wagter lê in bande,
neergevel in bitt’re skande,
want die burgers op die mure
het die burg verraai.

II
(Junie 1915)
Wagter, die nag is donker,
donker en o, so bang:
vijande buite, wat raas en woed,
vriende gekeerd teen hul eie bloed,
en oor die burgers ‘n doodse slaap–
wagter, die nag was bang.
Trouw was jouw wag op die voorste wal,
helder en luid jouw basuingeskal,
maar oor die burgers ‘n doodse slaap–
wagter, hoe lang, hoe lang?

Wagter, siedaar, die skadewee
versmelt als, ‘n ligte skim
Hoor ‘n geruis in die beendre! die dood
voel nuwe lewe ontkiem in haar skoot.
Strijders, ontwaakte, die swaard ontbloot!
Wagter, ‘n goue môreson
verrijs aan die oosterkim.
—H A FAGAN

Die Visser

(Uit die Duits van Goethe)

Die water ruis, die water rol:
‘n visser sonder smart
sit daar te hengel vredevol,
ja koel tot in sijn hart.
En wijl hij loer en wijl hij sit,
deel sig die vloed in twee:
‘n vogtig meerwijf, haelwit,
stijg uit die siedende see.

Sij sing tot hom, sij spreek tot hom;
“Wat lok jij uit mijn skoot
“met mensekuns en menselis
“mijn kinders tot die dood?
“Wis jij hoe rijk die vissies is
“hier onder in die see,
“dan sou jij afdaal en gewis
“ook vind die ware vree.

“Moet nie die son en maan hul rig
“vir laafnis tot die vloed?
“Toon golwe-aad’mend hul gesig
“nie tweemaal skoner gloed?
“Ag jij die diepe hemel lig,
“die vog-beglansde blouw?
“Lok nie jouw eie aangesig
“jou in die eeuw’ge douw?”

Die water ruis, die water rol;
benat sijn naakte voet;
sijn hart word van verlange vol
als hij ‘n minnegroet.
Sij spreek tot hom, sij sing tot hom:
weerstaan kon hij nie meer;
half trek sij hom, half sink hij in,
en niemand sien hom weer.
J J S

Aan Mijn Vaderland

Trouwe liefde al mijn dae,
sweer ek jou met hand en hart!
Al jouw vreug is mijn behae,
en jouw leed mijn diepste smart!

Want mijn alles, selfs mijn lewe,
dank ek jou, mijn vaderland:
dis van jou mij vrij gegewe,
uitgereik met milde hand.

Daarom sing ek jou mijn sange
en mijn lied’re vir altijd;
daarom is ook mijn verlange
en mijn strewe jou gewijd.

Maar ons is nie net verenig
als jij in die sonskijn baai:
ek wil ook jouw smarte lenig,
als die stormwind anstig waai.

En nie net met woordeklanke
is ek tot jouw diens bereid:
met mijn daad is jij te danke
in jouw nood en angs en strijd.

Ek sal pal staan, tot ek sterwe
teen tiranne, wat jou druk:
tronk, verbanning wil ek erwe,
eer ek voor hul gruwels buk.

Is die nagte soms ook duister,
eind’lik daag dit in die oos,
en die dag vol glans en luister
bring die matte strijder troos.

Trouwe liefde al mijn dae.
sweer ek jou met hand en hart!
Al jouw vreug is mijn behae,
en jouw leed mijn diepste smart!
W.K. van Elssen


WINTER
Die eikebome
staan bleek en kaal,
en die popliere
als as so vaal,
Oor tuin en velde
kom elke nag
‘n kille laken
van spierwit prag.
Die newels drijwe
die vleie oor
en keer die sonskijn
aan al kant voor.
Die awendwindjie
speel langs die hang,
druk ijsig soene
op elke wang.

Dis oral aaklige!
Natuur is dood;
en ook mijn harte
word swaar als lood.

Maar nee, mijn liefste!
ek kan nie treur:
jouw liefde lewe
om op te beur.

Jouw oë melde
in minnegloed
waar wintersweeë
vergeefs teen woed.

Dit wil mijn siele
verwarm, verblij,
en vir die lente
reeds voorberei.

W K van Elssen

THE FISHERMAN.

THE waters rush’d, the waters rose,

A fisherman sat by,
While on his line in calm repose

He cast his patient eye.
And as he sat, and hearken’d there,

The flood was cleft in twain,
And, lo! a dripping mermaid fair

Sprang from the troubled main.

She sang to him, and spake the while:

“Why lurest thou my brood,
With human wit and human guile

From out their native flood?
Oh, couldst thou know how gladly dart

The fish across the sea,
Thou wouldst descend, e’en as thou art,

And truly happy be!

“Do not the sun and moon with grace

Their forms in ocean lave?
Shines not with twofold charms their face,

When rising from the wave?
The deep, deep heavens, then lure thee not,–

The moist yet radiant blue,–
Not thine own form,–to tempt thy lot

‘Midst this eternal dew?”

The waters rush’d, the waters rose,

Wetting his naked feet;
As if his true love’s words were those,

His heart with longing beat.
She sang to him, to him spake she,

His doom was fix’d, I ween;
Half drew she him, and half sank he,

And ne’er again was seen.

Goethe: 1779

An Afrikaans love song…

Luister na “Dink jy darem nog aan my”

Sias Reyneke was member of “Groep Twee” – (Group Two)

groeptwee

Joy: Paradise Road

joy

Joy

Master Jack

It’s a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack.
You taught me all I know and I never look back.
It’s a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack.

You took a coloured ribbon from out of the sky,
and taught me how to use it as the years went by.
To tie up all your problems and make them believe.
And then to sell them to the people in the street.

It’s a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack.
You taught me all I know and I never look back.
It’s a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack.

I saw right thru the way you started teaching me now.
So someday soon you could get to use me somehow.
I thank you very much you know you’ve been very kind.
But, I’d better move along before you change my mind

It’s a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack
No hard feelings if I never come back
It’s a very strange world and I thank you, Master Jack

You taught me all the things the way you’d like ’em to be.
But I’d like to see if other people agree.
It’s all very interesting the way you describe
But I’d like to see the world thru my own eyes.

It’s a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack.
No hard feelings if I never come back
You’re a very strange man and I thank you, Master Jack.
You’re a very strange man and I thank you, Master Jack.
You’re a very strange man, aren’t you, Master Jack?

Four Jacks and a Jill with “Master Jack”

master-jack

http://www.mnet.co.za/Mnet/Shows/carteblanche/story.asp?Id=2876

Rabbit…South Africa’s rock group from the 70’s with Duncan Faure, Trevor Rabin, Dave Matthews…read the next article about Trevor! Read   this article about  Trevor Rabin… now in Hollywood…writing the score for Hollywood movies…-follow the link to Mnet.
He wrote the score for Hollywood movies like Enemy of the State, Armageddon and National Treasure and won more awards than he can count, including several Grammies.
It started off with classical piano lessons as a boy. ? He then embarked on a lifelong love affair with the guitar. The name is Trevor Rabin, South Africa’s celebrated guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer.

You might remember him from Rabbit or Yes, but Trevor Rabin has left the rock stage for the lights of Hollywood. He has written the score for 25 movies.

Here at his Los Angeles home studio, he creates the stuff Hollywood dreams are made of.

A stone’s throw from the houses of the producers and actors he composes for, Trevor is crafting away at the music of yet another feature film – Glory Road, to be released soon

If you would watch or listen to a movie without the music, you would be amazed as to what a difference the score makes. And that is where Trevor has found a new profession – playing with our emotions. Continue reading on the link in the start of this article…and now you can listen to..Charlie!
rabbit1


Rabbit with…Charlie

rabbit

Rabbit

Mango Groove: Special Star

mango-groove

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

Another award for my blog and this time by Little Indian! which I receive with much appreciation, Little Indian! I’ve started recently reading his blog and he’s also  a great cricket fan…and even has a blog with a forum!  I have to nominate 7 other blogs,  but I know Little Indian would be happy with me passing it this time as I’ve just nominated 8 blogs 2 days ago for my other award. Instead, I’m going to let you all listen to an Afrikaans song, it’s beautiful and I love it. I’ve previously blogged a song by Laurika Rauch which I’ve translated for you in English…- called “Suncatcher”…- to understand the words. This time, I want you to listen and follow the English words as it’s such a beautiful song…a little bit of a “blues” song…words of the song by Christopher Torr. With any song you translate (or poem) is not always easy to keep the  rhyming pattern and in this case, it was again a problem, but at least the song makes sense and you can enjoy it! I’ve previously said and I would like to say again…Laurika Rauch is one of our best Afrikaans artists in South Africa. We all love her to bits and she’s just amazing! If you follow the link in this post, you will see the audience’s reaction when she approaches the stage to sing her song with Valliant. Wow! while two other bloggers mentioned stats, I took a look myself this morning and found this number in the total summary…and this is since Nov when I moved my blog from Blogger…thanks to you all as you the visitor, caused this number!


 Image: http://protopopescu.org/dan/Travel/Scotland

DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS

KOOR (1):
SING VIR MY SAGGIES, SING VAN DIE REËN
WAAR KOM DIT VANDAAN, WAAR GAAN DIT HEEN?
MY HART IS AL LANKAL, LANKAL GEBREEK
EK HET JOU BYNA, JOU BYNA VERGEET

1. DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS BESKOU
DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE OGGENDDOU
MY HART IS LANKAL REEDS GEBREEK
EK HET DIT NET-NET WEGGESTEEK

2. DALK IS DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE REËN
DIT SAL DIE AARDE PLEK-PLEK SEËN
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS SÊ JA
VERSPREIDE BUIE HIER EN DAAR

KOOR (1)

3. DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS WIL HOOR
WAAR HET JY EERS JOU HART VERLOOR?
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS SÊ NEE
DAAR’S BAIE VISSE IN DIE SEE

4. MY HART IS AMPER WEER GEBREEK
EK HET DIT NET-NET WEGGESTEEK
DIE MENSE OP DIE BUS BESKOU
DIE LIEFDE SOOS DIE OGGENDDOU

KOOR (2):
SING VIR MY SAGGIES, SING VAN DIE REËN
WAAR KOM DIT VANDAAN, WAAR GAAN DIT HEEN?
MY HART IS AL LANKAL, LANKAL GEBREEK
EK HET JOU BYNAAM, JOU BYNAAM VERGEET

2X KOOR (1)

…EK HET JOU BYNAAM, JOU BYNAAM VERGEET


Sivertson.com/Images/

English :

..”The people on the bus”

Choir (1)
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

1. The people on the bus regard
Love like the early morning dew
My heart’s already been broken long ago
I have hidden it only just

2. Perhaps the love is like the rain
Blessing the earth just here and there
The people on the bus say yeah
Scattered showers here and there

Choir (1)
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

3. The people on the bus want to hear
Where you’d first lost your heart?
The people on the bus say no
There’s plenty of fish in the sea

4. My heart was nearly broken ‘gain
I have only just hidden it
The people on the bus regard
Love like the early morning dew

Choir (2)
Sing to my softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I have forgotten your nickname

Choir 1:
Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I nearly forgot you, so very nearly

Sing to me softly, sing ’bout the rain
Where does it come from, where does it go?
My heart’s been broken long, long ago
I have forgotten your nickname
I have forgotten your nickname


Image: lockhartfineart.com…Rain showers at Monarch Lake

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »